Author - John Coyne

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Don Dirnberger –Noah’s Ark The Event (Antigua)
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The latest on developments about the U.S. Peace Corps and COVID-19 global evacuation 
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Pelosi appoints Rep. Donna Shalala (Iran) to coronavirus oversight panel
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Review — ENCOUNTERS WITH RONGELAP by Richard Sundt (Marshall Islands)
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Peace Corps faces uncertain future with no Volunteers in field
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EPCVs–The Government Wants You: Hiring Returned Peace Corps Volunteers
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After COVID-19 evacuations, volunteers fear for future of Peace Corps
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Paul Courtright (South Korea) tells the world about the Gwangju Democratization Moment, 40 Years Later
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RPCV & Nobel Peace Prize Nominee Writes His Peace Corps Memoir (Costa Rica)
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A Plan to Defeat Coronavirus Finally Emerges

Don Dirnberger –Noah’s Ark The Event (Antigua)

  Noah’s Ark The Event by Don Dirnberger (Antiqua 1977-79) Self-published/Amazon 88 pages April 2020 $0 (kindle); $29.99 (paperback)   Noah’s Ark The Event is about The Wobble and the aftermath upon the marble we call Earth. This book is sci-fi with a basis in reality. The events which have been occurring around us gave me a pause to consider the possibility of life on the planet after the predicted happened. It has long been stated in many civilizations and with scientific evidence that The Wobble is a real event. We are past due for it to occur. The book is a simple explanation of what might happen given the likelihood of history repeating itself. That repeat may have caused the extinction during the eons of the life cycle of the planet. Read with the open mind that should it occur we will either perish or survive based on our . . .

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The latest on developments about the U.S. Peace Corps and COVID-19 global evacuation 

Thanks for the ‘heads up’ from Dale Gilles (Liberia 1964-67)       Click for  The latest on developments about the U.S. Peace Corps and COVID-19 global evacuation  By Robert Nolan with Greg Emerson, and Maricarmen Smith-Martinez at Flipboard.com.  

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Pelosi appoints Rep. Donna Shalala (Iran) to coronavirus oversight panel

Thanks for the ‘heads up’ from Dale Gilles (Liberia 1964-67)     Pelosi appoints Rep. Donna Shalala to coronavirus oversight panel BY TAL AXELROD – 04/18/20    Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) tapped Florida Rep. Donna Shalala (D) (Iran 1962-64) to serve on the five-member congressional commission overseeing the Trump administration’s implementation of the latest $2.2 trillion coronavirus relief package. Shalala was elected to her seat in the Democratic wave in 2018, but before that served as Health and Human Services (HHS) secretary under President Clinton, experience Pelosi said made her well-suited to serve on the commission. “Congresswoman Donna Shalala is a deeply respected and highly accomplished leader in the Congress and country, who has for decades led the fight to defend the health and economic security of the American people at the highest levels of government,” Pelosi said in a statement Friday night. “Her leadership as Secretary of Health and Human Services will serve . . .

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Review — ENCOUNTERS WITH RONGELAP by Richard Sundt (Marshall Islands)

  Encounters with Rongelap: 1968-1969 Fourteen Years After the Nuclear Fallout — Life & Environment Around a Great Lagoon by Richard Sundt (Marshall Island 1968-69) Self-published 132 pages October 2019 $30.00 (print); $1.99 (Ebook) [Buy from: blurb.com.] Reviewed By Bob Arias (Colombia 1964-66) • “Rongelap was my home away from home!” Author Richard Sundt brings us “three books” in one that is an exciting look at his Peace Corps experience on the Marshall Islands in the Pacific. Encounters with Rongelap takes us to his Peace Corps site in Rongelap Atoll, home for two years, 1968-1969, which was fourteen years after the nuclear testing on the Bikini Atoll, a distance of 94 miles away,  in 1954 . An awesome cover with a view of the Pacific introduces you to an exciting book filled with lots and lots of photos, and detailed reports home to his parents. Book One consisted of the numerous reports . . .

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Peace Corps faces uncertain future with no Volunteers in field

Thanks for the ‘heads up’ from Marnie Mueller (Ecuador 1963-65)     Peace Corps faces uncertain future with no Volunteers in field BY REBECCA BEITSCH – 04/16/20 06:00 AM EDT 36   The Peace Corps has found itself in uncharted territory after evacuating all 7,300 of its volunteers worldwide due to the coronavirus pandemic. The agency, which places volunteers in more than 60 countries, has never before evacuated its entire volunteer roster, leaving questions about what lies ahead for evacuees and how the Peace Corps plans to rebuild once the outbreak subsides. Volunteers, who typically spend two to three years living and working in impoverished communities, had in some cases just a day’s notice to evacuate aafter Peace Corps made the move official last month. “When someone tells you you have one day to pack up three years of your life into two suitcases, it’s just so overwhelming but also so emotionally draining you . . .

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EPCVs–The Government Wants You: Hiring Returned Peace Corps Volunteers

  ERPCVs! — USAID opportunities US Agency for International Development (USAID) Human Capital and Talent Management (HCTM) has released a batch announcement for positions specifically for RPCVs to use their non-competitive eligibility. Please share far and wide among your networks! Exclusive Advertisement for Peace Corps Eligibles Great opportunities for those evacuated Volunteers to consider. International Cooperation Specialist (GS-0136-13) As an International Cooperation Specialist, you are the key communication link and liaison between the headquarters Bureaus and the Mission(s) in areas such as strategic planning and budget preparation, and program reviews. You will represent your selected Bureau’s interests to senior-level and other host-government officials, as well as representatives of local private sector and non-government organization (NGO) entities. Democracy Specialist (GS-0301-13) As a Democracy Specialist, you will serve as a technical expert on democracy, human rights, and governance (DRG); provide technical DRG advice and support to Missions overseas; formulate policy and programming guidance . . .

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After COVID-19 evacuations, volunteers fear for future of Peace Corps

By Amy Lieberman // 14 April 2020 Pedro Razo, one of the thousands of Peace Corps volunteers who were called back to the U.S. due to the coronavirus pandemic. Photo by: Jose M. Osorio / Abaca Press via ReutersNEW YORK — One month after COVID-19 prompted the Peace Corps to temporarily halt operations, former and prospective volunteers are wondering how the organization can regain its footing. Funding challenges could continue to complicate a return to normal, even once international travel and nonessential work resume, they said. “A lot of us, when we saw the news of the worldwide evacuation, we immediately worried about the long-term survival of the Peace Corps. Peace Corps is one of those programs of soft diplomacy, based on partnership and the belief that development rises the tide and that rising tide helps communities empower themselves,” said Greg Emerson, a member of the New York City Peace Corps Association board and a former volunteer . . .

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Paul Courtright (South Korea) tells the world about the Gwangju Democratization Moment, 40 Years Later

Thanks for the ‘heads up’ from Steven Boyd Saum (Ukraine 1994-96)   Telling the world about the Gwangju Democratization Movement, 40 years later Paul Courtright (South Korea 1979-81) witnessed the 1980 movement and wants to set the record straight amid current attempts to distort its history for Hankyoreh  by Kim Yong-hee, Gwangju correspondent From his arrival in South Korea in 1979 with the US Peace Corps until 1981, Paul Courtright, 66, took care of patients with Hansen’s disease (formerly known as leprosy) at a shelter called Hohyewon in Naju, South Jeolla Province. On May 19, 1980, Courtright was at the Gwangju intercity bus terminal on a trip to Seoul when he saw armed soldiers from a special forces brigade beating a young man with clubs. Courtright wanted to step in, but he only watched, paralyzed by fear. Stricken with guilt for failing to help the man being clubbed, he made . . .

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RPCV & Nobel Peace Prize Nominee Writes His Peace Corps Memoir (Costa Rica)

  From Mid Hudson News April 10, 2020 Hudson Valley resident and four-time Nobel Peace Prize nominee David Taylor Ives (Costa Rica 1980-82) has announced that his new memoir, American Dreamer is available for purchase. The book captures memories of Ives’s experiences of a Peace Corps volunteer – the time spent working in schools and community gardens in impoverished parts of the world, and how the opportunity paved the way to Ives becoming a global humanitarian. Since the early days in the Peace Corps, the author has worked with leaders like President Jimmy Carter and the Dalai Lama, served as the senior advisor to the Permanent Secretariat of the Summits of Nobel Peace Prize Laureates, and become well-known for his speeches about humanitarian issues, which he delivers as to generate interest in the world peace initiatives with which he’s involved throughout the world. According to Ives, “American Dreamer gave me . . .

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A Plan to Defeat Coronavirus Finally Emerges

Thanks for the ‘heads up’ from Arnold Zetlin (Ghana 1961-62)     A plan to defeat coronavirus finally emerges, but it’s not from the White House In the absence of federal direction, states and America’s top experts forge the path ahead. by Lena H. Sun, William Wan and Yasmeen Abutaleb April 10, 2020 Washington Post   Experts have proposed transforming the Peace Corps — which suspended global operations last month and recalled 7,000 volunteers to America — into a national response corps that could perform many tasks, including contact tracing. A national plan to fight the coronavirus pandemic in the United States and return Americans to jobs and classrooms is emerging — but not from the White House. Instead, a collection of governors, former government officials, disease specialists and nonprofits are pursuing a strategy that relies on the three pillars of disease control: Ramp up testing to identify people who are infected. Find everyone they interact with by . . .

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