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All In My Family by Rich Wandschneider (Turkey)
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Washington Post obit of Laurence Pope (Tunisia)
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RPCV Drew Days III (Honduras) – first African American to head Justice Department Civil Rights Division dies
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A Writer Writes — “A Season of Survivor Was Filmed on an Island Nicer Than Mine“ by Harry Seitz (Tonga)
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New Harris Wofford Award recognizes AmeriCorps and Peace Corps alumni
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WHAT IS ETHIOPIA? — the coloring book
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She helped South Korea in Its time of need. In the pandemic, it repaid her.
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Review — Relicarios: The Forgotten Jewels of Latin America by Martha J. Egan (Venezuela)
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RPCV Jason McFarland (China) appointed to National Liturgical Council
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Remembering Robert M. Veatch (Nigeria), PhD 1939-2020

All In My Family by Rich Wandschneider (Turkey)

All in My Family By Rich Wandschneider (Turkey 1965-67) Published in Writers on the Range When “All in the Family” hit the TV screens in 1971, the war in Vietnam was raging, cities from Washington, D.C., to Detroit, were charred from riots in the wake of Martin Luther King’s assassination, and many young people like me were leaving those cities, moving West to rural America. Archie Bunker stayed in Queens, where a “bar was a man’s castle,” while daughter Gloria and son-in-law “Meathead” tried to help Archie grasp hippies and anti-war protests. We called ours the “back to the land” movement, and we chuckled with Meathead as Archie Bunker got chuckles from our dads. But we were done watching “Leave it to Beaver” and “Ozzie and Harriet.” Our flexible families were radically changing. Well, the family has changed again, and, I’d argue that my own, occasionally dysfunctional family is closer . . .

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Washington Post obit of Laurence Pope (Tunisia)

By Harrison Smith November 16, 2020 Laurence Pope (Tunisia 1967-69), a veteran diplomat and counterterrorism expert who came out of retirement to serve as the top U.S. envoy to Libya weeks after the 2012 attack that killed Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans in Benghazi, died Oct. 31 at his home in Portland, Maine. He was 75. The cause was pancreatic cancer, said his wife, Elizabeth Pope. In his 31 years as a diplomat, Mr. Pope helped shape Iran and Iraq policy at the State Department, was appointed ambassador to Chad by President Bill Clinton and served as political adviser to Gen. Anthony Zinni, head of Central Command, which manages U.S. forces in the Middle East. He had been retired for more than a decade when Islamist militants launched an assault on the American diplomatic compound in Benghazi on Sept. 11, 2012. The attack marked the first time a U.S. . . .

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RPCV Drew Days III (Honduras) – first African American to head Justice Department Civil Rights Division dies

  Drew S. Days III (Honduras 1967-69), who was the first African American to head the civil rights division of the Justice Department and later became solicitor general under President Bill Clinton, died on Sunday at a long-term care facility in East Haven, Connecticut. He was 79. His wife, Ann Langdon-Days (Honduras 1967-69) said the cause was complications of dementia. Born in the segregated South, Days went to Yale Law School, fought for civil rights through the courts and enjoyed a meteoric career that might have led to a seat on the U.S. Supreme Court if not for his legal opinion in an obscure child pornography case. He knew from an early age that he wanted to work for civil rights. “I rode segregated buses and I was from the era with the segregated lunch counters and water fountains,” he recalled in a 2014 interview with the Touro Law Review. . . .

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A Writer Writes — “A Season of Survivor Was Filmed on an Island Nicer Than Mine“ by Harry Seitz (Tonga)

• I served in the Peace Corps in Tonga from 2014–2016. Some of the volunteers got sent to sites in the capital. They had electricity, running water, supermarkets, the works. A few of the others were sent to ’Eua, a large island close to the capital. Life was a little more difficult there, but they still had all of the basic amenities. The remainder and I were sent to Vava’u, the main island of which is relatively developed, but also much further away from the capital. I alone was sent to Ofu. While technically a part of Vava’u, it is an outer island. No roads, no restaurants, and very limited electricity. Ferries didn’t even run there. I had to hitch boat rides with my neighbors every other weekend to buy food on the main island of Vava’u. Lifuka (Survivor Island) Lifuka is a part of the Ha’apai group of islands. . . .

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New Harris Wofford Award recognizes AmeriCorps and Peace Corps alumni

(WASHINGTON, D.C., Nov 19, 2020) – AmeriCorps today announced the Harris Wofford Joint Service Award, a new award for individuals who have served in both Peace Corps and AmeriCorps. Honoring the legacy of the late Senator Harris Wofford, who helped establish both the Peace Corps and AmeriCorps, the award will recognize more than 10,000 individuals who have already chosen to serve their country at home and abroad through both programs, as well as the thousands more who make that same commitment in the future. The Harris Wofford Joint Service Award will be available to individuals who have successfully completed both a full year of service in AmeriCorps, as well as service in Peace Corps or Peace Corps Response. “Each year, thousands of Americans make the commitment to serve through AmeriCorps and Peace Corps. Our country needs their service now more than ever, and this award is just one way we . . .

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WHAT IS ETHIOPIA? — the coloring book

  Andrew Tadross (Ethiopia 2011-13) has published a coloring book for all ages, entitled What is  Ethiopia? that comes at a disquieting time for Ethiopia, and attempts to show Ethiopia as the sum of its parts. The book takes you on a journey to understand “What is Ethiopia?” There are 24 pages of illustrations of  Ethiopian people, cultures, food, landscapes, wildlife, architecture, and history all to be colored.  The illustrations are complemented by engaging descriptions and narratives about Ethiopian life by Andrew. Additionally, there is a trivia quiz.   The sole artist of all 24 illustrations is Biniyam Alazar, a 19-year-old secondary school student from Bahir Dar. Biniyam aims to continue in the art profession. He has an interest in painting and has become proficient in digital illustration. As he develops his skills, Biniyam would like to get into graphic novels, comic books, and other mediums that are novel for Ethiopians. He would . . .

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She helped South Korea in Its time of need. In the pandemic, it repaid her.

  NYTimes November 20, 2020 SEOUL, South Korea — Sandra Nathan spent 1966 to 1968 in a South Korean town as a young Peace Corps volunteer, teaching English to high school girls. Fifty-two years later, Ms. Nathan, now back in the United States, received a care package from South Korea that nearly brought her to tears. Ms. Nathan, 75, had been feeling increasingly isolated at home in Stephentown, N.Y. Reports about the exploding number of Covid-19 cases in the United States had made her anxious about going outside, where experts warned of second and third waves of infection. Then, early this month, she received a packaged labeled “Covid-19 Survival Box.” It was a gift from the South Korean government that contained ​100 ​masks and other items “as a token of our gratitude for your dedication to Korea.” “It was as if this box had been traveling to me since 1968,” . . .

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Review — Relicarios: The Forgotten Jewels of Latin America by Martha J. Egan (Venezuela)

Relicarios: The Forgotten Jewels of Latin America By Martha J. Egan (Venezuela 1967-69) Papalote Press 175 Pages September 2020 $75.00 Hardcover Reviewed by Marnie Mueller (Ecuador 1963-65) • Soon after I agreed to review Martha J. Egan’s new book, Relicarios, the Forgotten Jewels of Latin America, I had second thoughts about doing it. How could I, who have strong political opinions about the Conquest of Latin America by Spaniards and the consequent oppression of indigenous populations, be open enough to the material to give it an objective consideration? I still vividly recall arriving in the colonial city of Quito, Ecuador in March of 1964, where I witnessed the subjugation of Indians in the streets, soon discovering that they were literally considered untouchables, as they reflexively covered their hands with their ponchos if I reached out to shake theirs. It was caste-mandated that they do so. Still, I went forward with . . .

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RPCV Jason McFarland (China) appointed to National Liturgical Council

November 18, 2020 • Assistant Director of ACU’s Centre for Liturgy, Dr. Jason McFarland (China 2012-14), has been appointed to the National Liturgical Council to advise on matters pertaining to Catholic liturgical worship in the Australian context. Dr. McFarland teaches Liturgical Studies and Sacramental Theology and is Assistant Director of the Australian Catholic University (ACU) Centre for Liturgy. He is the author of the influential book Announcing the Feast: The Entrance Song in the Mass of the Roman Rite, which has informed liturgical practice in many parts of the English-speaking Church. The National Liturgical Council is an advisory body established by the Australian Catholic Bishops Conference, advising the Bishops Commission for Liturgy on matters pertaining to Catholic liturgical worship. In announcing the appointment, the Chairman of the Bishops Commission for Liturgy Archbishop Pat O’Regan cited the appreciation of the Commission for Dr McFarland’s fine work as an editor at the . . .

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Remembering Robert M. Veatch (Nigeria), PhD 1939-2020

  Robert M. Veatch (Nigeria 1962-64), PhD, Senior Research Scholar at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Professor Emeritus of Medical Ethics, and a Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Georgetown University died Monday, November 9, 2020 at age 81 after a short illness. Bob Veatch was a founding figure in the field of bioethics. He spent the majority of his long career at Georgetown University’s Joseph P. and Rose F. Kennedy Institute of Ethics (KIE) spending 40+ years there and serving as a former Director of the Institute from 1989-1996. He began the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal (1991) and served as Senior Editor until 2011. He also cofounded and edited the Ethics and Intellectual Disability Newsletter. Before coming to Georgetown, he began his career at the Hastings Center in 1970. Bob held an MA and PhD in Religion and Society from Harvard University, with a focus on medical ethics that he proposed. . . . .

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