Archive - October 2010

1
JFK's Wordsmith…Ted Sorensen
2
Cheap Wine And Love Peace Corps Style
3
October 2010 Books By Peace Corps Writers
4
Whatever Happened to Gwyn Hyman Rubio (Costa Rica 1971-73)?
5
Village Life: Peace Corps Experience Enriches Me
6
From the Volunteer and RPCV
7
Potluck Peace Corps–Here's A NYC Event To Attend
8
Norm Rush Reviews V.S. Naipaul's Latest
9
How To Write A Novel
10
Peace Corps Director Delivers Keynote Address At American University School of Public Affairs Tonight

JFK's Wordsmith…Ted Sorensen

[On the 35th anniversary of the Peace Corps, in March of 1996, Mark Gearan, then Director of the agency, had the wisdom to stage three days of celebration for the agency in Washington, D.C. One event was at the Mayflower Hotel–where the agency was hatched in a suite of hotel rooms–was a dinner and speeches by key figures in the creation of the agency and in the administration. Coming to that event that evening where many of the ‘cast of characters’ who first brought the Peace Corps into being, including Warren Wiggins. Harris Wofford was there that night and spoke; Sarge Shriver spoke, as did PCV Congressman Sam Farr, former Director Loret Miller Ruppe, and a good friend of Mark Gearan, the Ambassador to the UN, Madeleine K. Albright. Also speaking was Theodore C. Sorensen, speechwriter and special council to President John F. Kennedy. Sorensen wrote most of JFK’s speeches, including the one JFK gave at the Cow Palace in San Francisco . . .

Read More

Cheap Wine And Love Peace Corps Style

“I thought he was a bit of a nerd,” said RPCV Stacey McKeever. That was the line that caught my attention in the detailed profile (written by Rosalie R. Radomsky) in the wedding section of The New York Times this Sunday. (NO, I don’t usually read that section, but a friend of ours was also married this weekend.) So I started to read about Stacey McKeever and Charles Fogelman who were married yesterday in New York by a friend of theirs, a Universal Life minister, at a bar/event space in Brooklyn. (That’s the way we do things in NYC!) Stacey & Charlie met during Training for Lesotho and while Charles from the very first thought that Stacey was “very pretty, and something about her independence and faith in herself is what drew me in.” Stacey thought Charlie was a nerd. Of course, at the same time, during Training, Stacey was keeping her distance from all the . . .

Read More

October 2010 Books By Peace Corps Writers

How to Cook a Crocodile: A Memoir with Recipes (Peace Corps memoir) by Bonnie Lee Black (Gabon 1996–98) Peace Corps Writers $15.99 448 pages October 2010 • Thoreau the Land Surveyor by Patrick Chura (Lithuania 1992–94) University Press of Florida $34.95 212 pages October 2010 • Ruffling The Peacock’s Feathers: Stories From Village India by David Howard Day (Kenya 1965–66; India 1967–68) XLibris $34.99 (hardback); $23.99 (paper); $9.99 (e-book) 402 pages September 2010 • A Longing for Wisdom: One Woman’s Conscience and Her Church by Patricia S. Taylor Edmisten (Peru 1962–64) iUniverse $23.95 (cloth); $13.95 (paper) 117 pages October 2010 www.patriciaedmistenbooks.com • Okanagan Odyssey: Journeys through Terrain, Terroir and Culture (Essays) by Don Gayton (Colombia 1966–68) Rocky Mountain Books $16.95 176 pages May 2010 • Man Facing West (Stories) by Don Gayton (Colombia 1966–68) Thistledown Press $17.95 170 pages September 2010 • A Granddaughter’s Rite of Passage: Tales from the . . .

Read More

Whatever Happened to Gwyn Hyman Rubio (Costa Rica 1971-73)?

In July 1998, Gwyn Hyman Rubio (Costa Rica 1971–73) published her first novel, Icy Sparks, to great critical acclaim. Icy Sparks was selected as one of the New York Times’ Notable Books of 1998, praised by Time Magazine, chosen as part of “The Next Wave of Great Literary Voices” in the Discover New Writers program, and picked as an Oprah Book Club Selection. Not bad as far as first novels go. Her second novel, published in 2005 by Viking was called The Woodsman’s Daughter. That story is set in the longleaf pine country of post-Civil War Georgia, revolves around Dalia, the daughter of Monroe Miller, a prosperous turpentine business owner. Both of these books received great reviews from everyone, including, most of all, Peace Corps Writers. Gwyn Hyman Rubio then disappeared! A couple day ago, however, her name popped up in an article in the Glasgow [Kentucky] Daily Times. It was a . . .

Read More

Village Life: Peace Corps Experience Enriches Me

Jan Worth-Nelson (Tonga 1976-78) published this essay in the East Village Magazine of Flint, Michigan in September.  Jan is the author of Night Blind, a novel published in 2006 and set in Tonga. You can find her essays, fiction and poetry on her web site, www.janworth.com and her blog, http://nightblindblog.blogspot.com/index.htm. She is the interim director of the Thompson Center for Learning and Teaching and teaches writing at UM-Flint. Jan was on a panel discussion at the University Michigan when the university recalled with a series of events and programs, JFK’s visit to the campus on the night of October 14, 1960, and introduced the idea of a ‘peace corps’ to the students at a 2 a.m. rally on the steps of the Student Union. ] I’m not sure what I was doing on Oct. 14, 1960, when John F. Kennedy came to the University of Michigan, stood on the steps of the Michigan Union and . . .

Read More

From the Volunteer and RPCV

  Mother Ship or Death Star, the voice of PC/DC, the Peace Corps Headquarters in Washington DC dominates in public records. It has been difficult for me to get beyond the administrative mode to find the authentic voice of actual Peace Corps Volunteers and others outside of official Washington. The DOS or Description of Service, the new Digital Library, the Information Collection and Exchange or ICE, and information from the Peace Corps Offices in Host Countries all include sources from outside PC/DC.  The late, but still lamented Peace Corps Library should also be included.  Let us start with the DOS and the Digital Library. Description of Service, or DOS. Sometimes referred to as COS, Close of Service document. Early Volunteers received a generic description of their service. It was the same for all members of the group, regardless of individual activities. The purpose for the DOS was to verify Peace . . .

Read More

Potluck Peace Corps–Here's A NYC Event To Attend

Are you interested in what you might eat during your Peace Corps service? Did you already serve in Peace Corps and love a certain dish from your host country? Whether you are considering Peace Corps service, are in the application process, or have already served, this event is for you! Friends and family are welcome. Come to this event to share some food from around the world and hear more about the Peace Corps experience. Peace Corps Potluck Wednesday, December 15, 2010 6:00 pm Special Guest Speaker: Bonnie Lee Black, (Gabon 1996-98) author of How To Cook a Crocodile: A Memoir with Recipes New York Regional Office Varick and Houston Street * RPCVs: Please bring a dish from your host country to share! If you want to attend, email Lisa Reitmeier at: lreitmeier@peacecorps.gov Bonnie Lee Black joined the Peace Corps at the age of fifty, after having been a writer/editor and chef/caterer . . .

Read More

Norm Rush Reviews V.S. Naipaul's Latest

Here’s a match up. Norman Rush (Botswana CD 1978-83) reviewed V.S. Naipaul’s new book: The Masque of Africa: Glimpses of African Belief that Knopf  just published. The book covers Naipaul’s 2008-2009 trip to Uganda, Ghana, Nigeria, the Ivory Coast, Gabon, and South Africa. Rush’s review is in The New York Review of Books (November 11, 2010) issue and opens with this line: It’s hard to be fair to V.S. Naipaul. You know the review is only going to get better. Norm goes onto write, “Hanging over the varying approaches to Naipaul’s work is the bad air released by Patrick French’s biography.” That book, The World Is What It is: The Authorized Biography of V.S. Naipaul came out in 2008.) Rush, and his absolutely charming and beautiful wife, Elsa, were co-directors in Botswana where, from all accounts, Norm handled the paperwork and Elsa handled the PCVs. From all accounts they were great directors and why . . .

Read More

How To Write A Novel

Fifty years ago, when I was going through Training for Peace Corps/Ethiopia at Georgetown University, I heard Katherine Anne Porter was speaking at a creative writing program, also taking place on campus, so I cut my classes and went to hear one of the most famous writers of the South. Katherine Anne was not part of the Agrarian movement, (men like John Crowe Ransom, Robert Penn Warren, etc.) but she was a great short story writer and had that year (1962) published her only novel, Ship of Fools. Talking about her novel, she made two points that I still remember, fifty years after sneaking into the lecture hall. One point was that she had written the last chapter of her novel first, and that was 20 years before she finished writing and publishing the book. She said that she had to write the last chapter first as she needed to know how the novel ended before . . .

Read More

Peace Corps Director Delivers Keynote Address At American University School of Public Affairs Tonight

American University’s School of Public Affairs annually grants the Roger W. Jones Award for Executive Leadership. The Award recognizes two public servants in the federal government whose careers are marked by extraordinary effectiveness in organizational development and a strong commitment to training and education managers and executives. This year’s awardees are: Kenneth E. Baker, Principal Assistant Deputy Administrator, Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, National Nuclear Security Administration Margaret A. Focarino, Deputy Commissioner for Patents, Patent and Trademark Office, U.S. Department of Commerce Aaron S. Williams, Director of the Peace Corps, will deliver the keynote address. In 2011, the Peace Corps will celebrate the 50th anniversary of its founding.

Read More

Copyright © 2019. Peace Corps Worldwide.