Peace Corps writers

1
Nancy S. Bercaw (Kenya) home from United Arab Emirates
2
Peter Hessler (China) — ”How China Controlled the Coronavirus”
3
Colin Rule (Eritrea) — “Separating the People from the Problem”
4
OWL OF THE EASTERN ICE by Jonathan Slaght (Russia) — a review
5
A Writer Writes: “The Even Keel of a Well Told Lie” by Mark Jacobs (Paraguay)
6
IN EVERY HILL A BURIAL PLACE — Publishers Weekly talks with Peter H. Reid (Tanzania)
7
HYPOGRIF IN BUBBAVILLE by Grif Stockley (Colombia)
8
JESSE, A MAN GOOD ENOUGH by Will Michelet aka Richard M. Grimsrud (India)
9
AMERICAN DATU by Ron Edgerton (Philippines)
10
We Called him Sarge — Remembering Sargent Shriver

Nancy S. Bercaw (Kenya) home from United Arab Emirates

  Nancy S. Bercaw New Senior Director of Communications and Marketing at Johnston Community College. August 10, 2020 Nancy Bercaw (Kenya 1988-89) comes to JCC from her prior role as senior advisor for communications and marketing at Ajman University in the United Arab Emirates. During her three-year tenure at Ajman, Bercaw helped the institution attract significant global visibility and earn recognition as having the third most international student body in the world. Previously, she served the University of Vermont in multiple communications capacities over a period of 15 years, which included the initial creation of UVM’s Center on Rural Addiction funded by a $6.6 million federal grant. “I look forward to bringing my experiences from Ajman and Vermont to the work of JCC here in Smithfield,” she said. “Every community deserves to be celebrated and promoted for its own unique and compelling story. What impresses me most about JCC thus . . .

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Peter Hessler (China) — ”How China Controlled the Coronavirus”

The New Yorker  10 Aug 2020 A few days before my return to classroom teaching at Sichuan University, I was biking across a deserted stretch of campus when I encountered a robot. The blocky machine stood about chest-high, on four wheels, not quite as long as a golf cart. In front was a T-shaped device that appeared to be some kind of sensor. The robot rolled past me, its electric motor humming. I turned around and tailed the thing at a distance of fifteen feet. It was May 27th, and it had been more than three months since my last visit to the university’s Jiang’an campus, which is on the outskirts of Chengdu, in southwestern China. In late February, when the spring semester was about to begin, I had hurried to campus to retrieve some materials from my office. We were nearly a month into a nationwide lockdown in response . . .

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Colin Rule (Eritrea) — “Separating the People from the Problem”

This article from Harvard’s “The Practice,” shines a light on ODR and its evolution using Colin Rule’s career as a guide. In building ODR systems for the world’s largest online marketplace and for court systems across the country, Rule’s career offers a window through which to observe and understand the larger ODR movement—a movement that is all the more important as the world grapples with the continued impacts of COVID-19.   Separating the People from the Problem The Rise of Online Dispute Resolution Colin Rule (Eritrea 1995–97) • When the Apple II was released in 1977, it was among the first computers marketed and mass-produced for businesses and individuals alike. Apple would later adopt the slogan “The computer for the rest of us,” hinting at its technology’s broad appeal among a nonexpert consumer base. It is fitting, then, that as a grade school student in 1980, Colin Rule first dabbled . . .

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OWL OF THE EASTERN ICE by Jonathan Slaght (Russia) — a review

Thanks for the ‘heads up’ from Steven Boyd Saum (Ukraine 1994-96)   Owls of the Eastern Ice by Jonathan C Slaght review – an extraordinary quest Drinking ethanol and saving the world … an old-school, tautly strung adventure in pursuit of the largest species of owl review by Helen Macdonald, 22 July,  The Guardian   Jonathan Slaght has the best author photograph I’ve ever seen. Pale, bearded, dressed in black, he gazes at the camera with forbidding intensity. Behind him are snowy woods and running water. Arms crossed, hands deep in a pair of unwieldy leather gauntlets, he holds against his chest a huge owl. Its feathers are shaggy and wet, and from its mouth protrudes the tail end of a silver fish. There’s something puppet-like about this creature, like a living Jim Henson creation, but it also resembles a beast pulled straight from the pages of a medieval bestiary – . . .

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A Writer Writes: “The Even Keel of a Well Told Lie” by Mark Jacobs (Paraguay)

  by Mark Jacobs (Paraguay 1978–80) The Oddville Press Summer 2020   NOBODY HITCHHIKED ANY MORE, not through this America so full of dread and bad history. That did not necessarily mean the thing could not be done. Thumb out. If a person were leaving Broadhope County in south Virginia headed toward a destination he was as yet unable to visualize, it could not hurt to try for a lift. Not on the highway, where police prowled, just a plain old country road. Thumb out. He put the odds at slim to none that somebody would stop and pick him up, this close to a dense wood of loblolly pines, under a gray sky in late October, a quarter mile from a broken-armed scarecrow in a field of corn- stalk stubble. Guilt by association. Slimmer still, those odds, that it would be a woman who stopped, but she did. He did . . .

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IN EVERY HILL A BURIAL PLACE — Publishers Weekly talks with Peter H. Reid (Tanzania)

by Lenny Picker Publishers Weekly Jul 24, 2020   In Every Hill a Burial Place: The Peace Corps Murder Trial in East Africa (Univ. of Kentucky, Sept.), [Peter] Reid revisits a 1966 murder in Tanzania that rocked the program. Both Peace Corps volunteers involved—Bill Kinsey, who was accused of murdering his wife, Peppy—were white. What role did race play in the investigation and trial? There was an interesting dynamic in Tanzania at the time. The country had recently thrown off the chains of European colonialism and was working hard to show its independence and the power of the African leadership. These factors played into the case. There were few African lawyers and even fewer judges. The defense attorneys, expert witnesses, and the judge were almost all white, and all had far more experience than the Africans on the prosecution side. I’m not sure the case demonstrates so much white privilege as the . . .

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HYPOGRIF IN BUBBAVILLE by Grif Stockley (Colombia)

  Explaining Elaine by Rex Nelson Arkansas Democrat-Gazette • Grif Stockley was born into the cotton culture of the Mid-South. His father, Griffin Jasper Stockley Sr., owned a cotton plantation at Lake Cormorant in the Mississippi Delta when the younger Stockley was born in October 1944. The family later moved across the Mississippi River to Marianna, where the father committed suicide during the final stages of cancer. Grif Stockley was 17 when his father died. Stockley excelled in school, serving as president of the student body and enrolling at what’s now Rhodes College at Memphis following high school graduation in 1962. Stockley entered the Peace Corps in 1965 after completing his bachelor’s degree in three years. He worked in Colombia for two years before being drafted into the U.S. Army. After his two-year tour of duty, Stockley began law school at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He went to . . .

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JESSE, A MAN GOOD ENOUGH by Will Michelet aka Richard M. Grimsrud (India)

  Jesse La Follette, an imagined social reformer, advocates for a program of transformative political change for Wisconsin in the mid-twentieth century that is eerily reminiscent of the early Christian Prophets. When he threatens too many of the powers that were then, though, he escapes the fate that Jesus Christ suffered two thousand years before only by the skin of his teeth and flees to a surprising and ironic refuge nearby to quietly continue his teaching. While in India as a Peace Corps Volunteer, Will Michelet learned about language as a means of connection to others and as a result became able to communicate to all of its various castes. This facility affected a commitment to the equal importance of each and every person in him. You will see this thread in his Jesse, a Man Good Enough. www.gloryboundpublishing.com • Richard M. Grimsrud writing as Will Michelet practiced employment and . . .

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AMERICAN DATU by Ron Edgerton (Philippines)

  An interesting look into Gen. John J. Pershing’s time in the Philippines Greeley resident Ron Edgerton recently penned the biography “American Datu” which highlights John J. Pershing’s military campaigns in the Philippines.   By TAMARA MARKARD | tmarkard@greeleytribune.com | Greeley CO Tribune July 16, 2020 Fans of the history of war have the opportunity to learn unique stories about Gen. John J. “Black Jack” Pershing through a new book penned by University of Northern Colorado professor emeritus of history Ron Edgerton. “American Datu,” released May 19, looks at the part Gen. John J. Pershing had on creating counterinsurgency methods used by U.S. officers as well as his time in the Philippines. The U.S. Government Counterinsurgency Guide, publish in January 2009, defines counterinsurgency as “comprehensive civilian and military efforts taken to simultaneously defeat and contain insurgency and address its root causes.” Many times these actions are taken against the activities of guerrillas or revolutionaries . . .

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We Called him Sarge — Remembering Sargent Shriver

  Next year, as we celebrate the 60th anniversary of the Peace Corps, Rosetta Books will publish We Called It a War by Sargent Shriver. This book was an unfinished memoir of Shriver’s about his work with the War on Poverty, and also much about starting and developing the Peace Corps. It had been edited by a partner in his law firm, Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson, LLP. Bill Josephson, Special Assistant to the Director and then General Counsel during the Shriver years, wrote in the Foreword of the book, “The manuscript of We Called It a War came to light, after nearly fifty years, in a box of Sargent Shriver documents that the Sargent Shriver Peace Institute received from Special Olympics International. When We Called It a War is published, Marian Beil and I– through our website that focuses on the Peace Corps and Peace Corps writers– want . . .

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