Archive - April 2012

1
Gene Sarazen's Shot Heard Around the World
2
Peace Corps to host Web-EX for Peace Corps Response Applicants – Open to all
3
New Play"Gruesome Playground Injuries" by Rajiv Joseph (Senegal 1996-98)
4
No Senator's Son A Peace Corps Writers Book
5
Review of Rob Davidson's The Farther Shore
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Review of R. J. Huddy's No Senator's Son
7
Under Blossoming Boughs
8
The Peace Corps is Looking for Someone who can Write!
9
Review of Steven D. Orr's The Perennial Wanderer
10
Word on the Streets of Cartagena

Gene Sarazen's Shot Heard Around the World

The double-eagle that Louis Oosthuizen scored on the second hole of Augusta National Golf Course on Sunday afternoon of this year’s Masters has already faded into history and golf trivia. It was the fourth such feat at Augusta, and remarkable as it was, that shot was not heard around the world, and was quickly over shadowed by Bobba Watson’s brilliant 52-degree wedge played from deep in the pines on the second play-off hole that won the tournament for him. Nevertheless, for a brief moment in the final round, Oosthuizen’s 4-iron on No. 2 brought back to mind the most famous double-eagle in golf’s history. Gene Sarazen’s fairway wood on No. 15 in 1935 catapulted him forever into fame, thanks to sports writer Grantland Rice who coined the phrase, “The Shot Heard Round the World.” Rice’s clever description made Sarazen’s career. It also made the Masters Tournament. Grantland Rice was, for . . .

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Peace Corps to host Web-EX for Peace Corps Response Applicants – Open to all

From the Peace Corps Response website: http://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=response.events May 03, 2012 Peace Corps Response Application Workshop (Web-Ex)
12:00 p.m. (EST) Register Check out our new and easy application process in a virtual information session May 3rd. Learn how to set up search agents, apply for multiple positions and check your application status at any time during the application process. We will also provide insider tips on how to get your application noticed by a Recruiter! Peace Corps Response provides opportunities for Returned Peace Corps Volunteers (RPCVs) and experienced professionals to undertake challenging, short (3-12 month) assignments in various program areas around the world. Attend this webinar to find out more information about our exciting new programs, upcoming assignments, and how to apply.
 Please register at least 24 hours in advance. Peace Corps Response is being expanded to include non-RPCVs.  Historically, Peace Corps has not been able to meet the demand for trained Personnel. This . . .

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New Play"Gruesome Playground Injuries" by Rajiv Joseph (Senegal 1996-98)

The regional premiere of “Gruesome Playground Injuries” by Cleveland Heights native Rajiv Joseph will be April 27 at Ensemble Theatre at 8 p.m. This play opened last January on Second Stage in New York City. In “Gruesome Playground Injuries,” childhood friends Kayleen and Doug find their lives intersecting as they compare the scars and physical calamities that keep drawing them together. Joseph today is a writer on Showtime’s current season of the drama “Nurse Jackie,” has won numerous awards, including being a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 2010. Still, Joseph, who moved to Cleveland Heights when he was four says he is “amazingly excited” to see his work produced where he grew up. “I had works produced all over the world before I was able to do something in Cleveland,” said Joseph.   Joseph says the play is “about a relationship, a friendship. It’s a love story about people who . . .

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No Senator's Son A Peace Corps Writers Book

No Senator’s Son by RJ Huddy has just been published by Peace Corps Writers Books. RJ Huddy is the pen name of  Bob Cochrane who was a PCV in Errachidia, Morocco from 1981-83.  This novel–No Senator’s Son–is about a young historian who decides to pursue his father’s dream for him and run for Congress. To accomplish this he must turn his back on his profession and on the woman he loves. People don’t vote for a man who speaks openly of historical events such as the Palestinian diaspora, and they don’t vote for a man with a Palestinian wife. So for nearly thirty years he hides his views on the Middle East, and his love for the beautiful Aziza Hatoum, choosing instead to lead a deteriorating, toxic life as a Kentucky Congressman. His squandered love has gained him nothing–nothing except the chance to run for president. Nothing except the chance to go for broke, with . . .

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Review of Rob Davidson's The Farther Shore

The Farther Shore by Rob Davidson (Eastern Caribbean 1990–92) Bear Star Press 158 pages $16.00 (paperback) 2012 Reviewed by Mark Brazaitis (Guatemala 1991-93) IF YOU ASK UNDERGRADUATES to name a modern short story writer they like, they might say (if they don’t say “Stephen King” or, forgetting what “modern” means, “Edgar Allan Poe”) “Raymond Carver,” although Carver died in 1988. There’s a good reason why: Carver’s stories about working class men and women in crisis are as elegant as they are spare. To compress so much emotion, so much complex psychology, so much life into such narrow borders is a wonder. So it’s no wonder Carver continues to have devotees — and imitators. If you’re an American short story writer and you haven’t been influenced, at least a little, by Carver, well, poor you. Most of the stories in Rob Davidson’s new collection The Farther Shore share with Carver’s tales . . .

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Review of R. J. Huddy's No Senator's Son

No Senator’s Son by R.J. Huddy (Morocco 1981–82) Peace Corps Writers 380 pages $17.50 (paperback), $2.99 (Kindle) 2011 Reviewed by Lawrence F. Lihosit (Honduras, 1975–77) FANS OF HARD-BOILED CRIME a la James M. Cain (The Postman Always Rings Twice) and political thrillers a la Jeffrey Archer (Kane and Abel) should make room on your bookshelves for R.J. Huddy’s third novel. The book follows an obscure Kentucky Congressman and his sons from 1959 until the 1990s. The author uses family tension to lay out a story about the Palestine problem and in so doing, simultaneously explores our government’s role in the Middle East from the time of FDR. The Congressman longs to create a family political dynasty but his youngest son volunteers for the armed forces rather than submit. He is killed in Vietnam. The older son studies at Georgetown, then in Beirut when it was still considered a Paris of . . .

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Under Blossoming Boughs

John Givens writes about his story: Peace Corps for me was transformative. My wife Gail and I were in Pusan, Korea from 1967 to 1969. We later lived in Kyoto for a few years and separated there. A couple of years later, I was accepted by the Iowa Writers Workshop, as was Dick Wiley, another K-III RPCV, who also lived in Japan. After teaching in San Francisco and publishing three novels, I returned to live in Tokyo for eight years. I have never written directly about my Peace Corps experience (other than a couple of puerile workshop stories). My second novel, A Friend in the Police, is very loosely based on what it might feel like to be thrown in at the deep end of an unfamiliar culture although the narrative is so heavily distorted by use of an unconventional point of view that it would never be classified as . . .

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The Peace Corps is Looking for Someone who can Write!

Job Title:Writer/Editor Agency:Peace Corps Job Announcement Number:DPC12-A0096-KC SALARY RANGE: $65,840.00 to $96,689.00 / Per Year OPEN PERIOD: Tuesday, April 17, 2012 to Tuesday, May 01, 2012 SERIES & GRADE: FP-1082-04 POSITION INFORMATION: Full Time – Term PROMOTION POTENTIAL: 04 DUTY LOCATIONS: 1 vacancy(s) in the following locations: Washington, Dist of Columbia WHO MAY BE CONSIDERED: United States Citizens JOB SUMMARY: Applications for this position are being processed through an on-line applicant assessment system that has been specifically configured for Peace Corps applicants. Even if you have already developed a resume in USAJOBS, you will need to access this on-line system to complete the application process. To obtain information about this position and TO APPLY, please click on https://www.avuecentral.com/casting/aiportal/control/toVacancy?referenceCode=QCRVC. KEY REQUIREMENTS See Other Information. DUTIES: Back to top Provides an initial review of specialized products to ensure that they meet approved editorial standards of objectivity, style, and manner of presentation. Recommends . . .

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Review of Steven D. Orr's The Perennial Wanderer

The Perennial Wanderer: An American in the World by Steven D. Orr (Panama 1964-66) Publish America 438 pages $6.95 (paperback), $6.60 (Kindle) 2010 Reviewed by David H. Day (Kenya 1965–66; India 1967–68) READERS OF STEVEN ORR’S DENSE FARRAGO of his Peace Corps service, global travels, military tours, and work-assignments-both long-term and short-in more than forty countries, should outfit themselves with flak jacket, crash-helmet, insect-repellant and  further shield themselves in an armored personnel carrier as they prepare to read The Perennial Wanderer. Orr has been knocked out, taken hostage, nearly asphyxiated by sulphuric fumes from Costa Rica’s Irazu volcano, narrowly avoided mortar shellings in Iraq, survived a near-fatal motorcycle crash, was wounded in Vietnam, and was rammed off the road by communists in Panama. When I finally made it to the end of this brisk, hefty narrative, I had to mop my brow and apply more anti-perspirant. My own two Peace . . .

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Word on the Streets of Cartagena

More stories from the streets of Cartagena. HCNs are saying that the SS agents refused to pay the young ladies (?) for the ‘services’ they performed when they found that they were transvestites! I doubt that is true. It appears that one lone SS agent ‘overslept’ and when his ‘guest’ wasn’t out of his room at 7 a.m. in accordance to rules of the hotel, the police were called (the agent didn’t answer his door) and then the police, as required, reported the incident to the Embassy and all ‘hell broke loose!.” Much more serious (for the Peace Corps) is the belief within the PCV Community of Colombia that the Ambassador may have played a role in keeping the President away from the Volunteers. The Embassy has never been happy about the Peace Corps being back in Colombia. They, for example, restrict Volunteer travel, keep their thumb down on anything that PCVs . . .

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