Author - John Coyne

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Mark Jacobs New Short Story in Hudson Review (Paraguay)
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News from the NPCA — Trump says “Cut $14 Million from Peace Corps Funding”
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Glenn Blumhorst’s RPCV Vacation (Guatemala)
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The Peace Corps announces 2019 top Volunteer-producing schools
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Review — THE INNOCENCE OF EDUCATION by Earl Carlton Huband (Oman)
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RCPV Wins Six-Word Memoir Writing Contest (El Salvador)
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The 58th Anniversary of the Peace Corps
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A Writer Writes — “Harris Wofford: An Exceptionally Good Man” by Jerry Norris (Colombia)
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Lasting Value of Peace Corps Service (Washington, D.C.)
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A Writer Writes — “The Peace Corps: It Can Get in Your Blood” by Bob Criso (Nigeria)

Mark Jacobs New Short Story in Hudson Review (Paraguay)

Mark Jacobs (Paraguay 1978-80) Mark was the winner of the 1998 Peace Corps Writers Maria Thomas Award for his novel Stone Cowboy. A former Foreign Service officer, he has published more than 100 stories in magazines including The Atlantic, The Southern Humanities Review, The Idaho Review, The Southern Review, and The Kenyon Review. His story “How Birds Communicate” won the Iowa Review Fiction Prize in 1998. His five books include three novels and two collections of short stories. His website can be found at http://www.markjacobsauthor.com. Click here and read: Bear’s Change “The Hudson Review is rare in having remained a forum for intelligent, well-written criticism and cultural commentary on a broad spectrum of topics. In fact it belongs to a tiny handful of magazines where the first criterion of inclusion is literary merit.” — The Wall Street Journal Founded in 1948, The Hudson Review is a quarterly magazine of literature and the arts published in New York City. Frederick Morgan, one of . . .

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News from the NPCA — Trump says “Cut $14 Million from Peace Corps Funding”

    President Trump Recommends $14 Million Funding Cut for Peace Corps For the third consecutive year, President Trump is recommending a reduction in funding for the Peace Corps. The president’s request of $396 million for the agency in Fiscal Year 2020 would represent a slightly more than three percent cut in funding ($14 million). The proposed reduction is part of a much larger 24 percent cut to the nation’s International Affairs Budget.Read more and see Service Year Alliance statement response to the Trump Administration’s proposal to eliminate national service in the FY20 budget.  

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Glenn Blumhorst’s RPCV Vacation (Guatemala)

If you call or email Glenn Blumhorst, NPCA President This is the message you get: “Greetings from El Paso! I’m on a volunteer vacation at Annunciation House March 19-29, with limited internet access. I’ll respond as soon as I can.” Short-Term Volunteers for Emergency Hospitality Posted on March 18, 2019 Beginning in summer 2018, we have seen an increase in the flow of refugees arriving at the El Paso border. As ICE detention facilities filled, the number of refugees being released by ICE increased.  As of the end of February 2019, 400-700+ refugees per day are being sent to Annunciation House. We are urgently seeking additional short-term volunteers to help us provide hospitality to these refugees. For more information, please read this document (PDF). Glenn Blumhorst (Guatemala 1988-91) continues to serve. He’s an example for all of us.  

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The Peace Corps announces 2019 top Volunteer-producing schools

    Peace Corps Press Release The Peace Corps announces 2019 top Volunteer-producing schools 03/20/2019 The University of Wisconsin-Madison boasts the No. 1 spot for large schools on Peace Corps’ Top Volunteer-Producing Colleges and Universities list, with 75 volunteers serving around the world. For the third consecutive year, Wisconsin holds the coveted top spot, but Badgers beware: the University of Virginia Cavaliers are closing the gap, jumping from No. 15 to No. 2 in just two years.With 74 UVA alumni serving as Peace Corps Volunteers, the school slides into a close second place on this year’s rankings. The University of California – Berkeley comes in at No. 11 on the large school list, but has sent over 3,500 alumni to Peace Corps service since 1961, more than any other school. Meanwhile, Arizona State University and The University of Arizona continue to duke it out in the desert. Currently 44 Sun . . .

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Review — THE INNOCENCE OF EDUCATION by Earl Carlton Huband (Oman)

    The Innocence of Education by  Earl Carlton Huband (Oman 1975-78) (Peace Corps poetry) 31 pages Longleaf Press November 2018 $10.00 (paperback) Reviewed by Tony Zurlo (Nigeria 1963-65) • Taking a lazy walk in the park, I stopped and observed a crystal clear pond, the sun reflecting brightly off the smooth surface. When my friend asked me to describe the pond, I paused at each of his questions. What was the shape of the pond? Rectangular, round, oblong, diamond? How about the shore line? Sandy or rocky? White or tan?  Were there fish in the pond? How about the . . . “Alright, already,” I interrupted. I’ll go back for a second reading. This is how I reacted to Earl Carlton Huband’s new chapbook, The Innocence of Education. My academically-trained eyes failed to discover the pure poetry of his book. Deposited in a remote fishing village in the Sultanate of Oman, Huband must shift . . .

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RCPV Wins Six-Word Memoir Writing Contest (El Salvador)

    Legend has it that Ernest Hemingway was once challenged to write a story in only six words. His response? “For sale: baby shoes, never worn.” In November 2006, Larry Smith, founder of SMITH Magazine, gave the six-word novel a personal twist by asking his community to describe their lives in exactly six words. Anticipating the microblogging explosion, SMITH originally launched Six-Word Memoirs in November 2006 as a simple online challenge asking: Can you tell your life story in six words? We have published more than 1 million life stories on sixwordsmemoirs.com — and counting! Most recently Smith Magazine asked about “love” Love Six words on love & heartbreak It was the best of love, it was the worst of love, and this month you shared it all. You wrote about loves that lasted (“Smoothing out wrinkles into old age.” — CanadaGoose) and ones crumbled (“Assumed lover loved me. My bad.” . . .

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The 58th Anniversary of the Peace Corps

    Thanks for the ‘heads up’ from Bill Josephson, Peace Corps General Counsel 1961-66     The Sargent Shriver Peace Institute Quote of the week — “The idea [of the Peace Corps is] that free and committed men and women can cross boundaries of culture and language, or alien tradition and great disparities of wealth, of old hostilities and new nationalisms, to meet with other men and women on the common ground of service to human welfare and human dignity. And if this idea isn’t going to change the world, then this world is beyond redemption!” Sargent Shriver | New York, NY | December 11, 1963 • Our Quote of the Week celebrates the 58th anniversary of the creation of the Peace Corps. On March 1, 1961, President Kennedy signed the executive order to create the Peace Corps. Three weeks later, on March 22, he would name Sargent Shriver as . . .

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A Writer Writes — “Harris Wofford: An Exceptionally Good Man” by Jerry Norris (Colombia)

    A Writer Writes   Harris Wofford: An Exceptionally Good Man By Jerry Norris (Colombia 1963-65)   When reading Harris Wofford’s January 21 obituary in the Washington Post, it brought to mind a simple fact: it was through his office that I entered a glide path which led to my being a Peace Corps Volunteer in Colombia. In January 1962, I had sent in an application but hadn’t heard back. Then, early that spring, having dinner one night with my family in Chicago, the telephone rang. My sister, Therese, rose to respond as she was closest. One minute later she came back into the kitchen, hands on her hips, saying in stark wonderment: it’s the White House that’s calling …and it’s for you! Soon, I was in discussion with a young woman who identified herself as one of Harris Wofford’s staff members. (At that time, he was Special Assistant . . .

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Lasting Value of Peace Corps Service (Washington, D.C.)

    WASHINGTON – Returned Peace Corps Volunteers and members of the diplomatic community March 12 had a forum at the State Department entitled “The Lasting Value of Peace Corps Service.” Hosted by the State Department employee affinity group Returned Peace Corps Volunteers @ State, the event was held in the Dean Acheson Auditorium and livestreamed for staff at U.S. embassies around the world. The roundtable conversation and Q&A focused on how Peace Corps service shapes the personal and professional lives of Returned Volunteers. “Serving in a rural area, being the only American that hundreds of people will ever meet—that is a really powerful thing,” said Emily Armitage, who was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Bulgaria before joining the State Department. Armitage recalled visiting with the people of her village in the months before Bulgaria entered the European Union and how valuable it was to be able to listen to . . .

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A Writer Writes — “The Peace Corps: It Can Get in Your Blood” by Bob Criso (Nigeria)

    THE PEACE CORPS: IT CAN GET IN YOUR BLOOD by Bob Criso (Nigeria 1966-67, Somalia 1967-68)  • The Reverend Nana Yaw Amponsah Antwi is pastor of The Presbyterian Church of Ghana, half a block away from my apartment. Every Sunday the street buzzes with women dressed in those resplendent West African prints and stylishly-sculpted head-wraps. Some of the men walk with obvious pride in their traditional robes, others just wear suits. The kids look like American kids but everyone looks so spiffed up as if they were going to a wedding. I overhear their melodic Twi which sounds similar to the Igbo that I studied for hours every day during Peace Corps training. Sometimes the women set up tables in front of the church after services and sell traditional foods like garri, yams and palm oil. These were the very staples of my diet in Ishiagu, Nigeria. If . . .

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