Archive - January 28, 2010

1
100 Days (Or Less) Part Five: Let Us Begin
2
Another Award Winning RPCV Writer–Ghlee E. Woodworth (Comoros Islands 1991-93)
3
RPCV Writer Has Big Book Coming in February (No, It's Not Theroux!)

100 Days (Or Less) Part Five: Let Us Begin

Sinclair Lewis was invited to talk to some students about the writer’s craft. He stood at the head of the class and asked, “How many of you here are really serious about being writers?” A sea of hands shot up. Lewis then asked, “Well, why aren’t you all home writing?” And with that he walked out of the room. It is time for you to become a writer. What follows is your daily log – each day has words of encouragement, advice, wisdom or a task for you to do to help you get your novel written. For the purpose of organization I am breaking the writing down into “days” but a day for you might be thirty minutes or a week’s time. What is important is that you keep at the task of writing something everyday and employ the ideas, methods, and words of wisdom from many successful writers . . .

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Another Award Winning RPCV Writer–Ghlee E. Woodworth (Comoros Islands 1991-93)

Using the unlikely topic of tombstones, Ghlee Woodworth, who spent some 13 years with the Peace Corps as a PCV in the Comoros Islands, and then as a Peace Corps Trainer for projects in Namibia, Swaziland, Niger, Bulgaria, Moldova, Armenia, Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan, and Bangladesh, traveling to a total of 45 countries before coming home to Newburyport, Massachusetts, where she pieced together a picture of 19th-century Newburyport through the stories of 80 people laid to rest in the Oak Hill Cemetery. And this is only her first volume. Tiptoe Through the Tombstones, which is self published, recently was named runner-up in the Biography/Autobiography category for the 2009 Book of the Year at the New England Book Festival (beating out the late Sen. Ted Kennedy’s book, True Compass). It tells the stories of some of Newburyport’s 19th-century founders: ship captains, entrepreneurs and political leaders. “It takes many citizens to build a community, and some of the people I’ve written about were . . .

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RPCV Writer Has Big Book Coming in February (No, It's Not Theroux!)

Eternal on the Water is “A touching love story immersed in the beautiful simplicity of nature and life lived in the present moment,” says novelist Lisa Genove about the new book by Joseph Monninger (Burkina Faso 1975-77). Monninger has written fiction and non-fiction, YAs, and memoirs. He had written about boxing matches and sled dogs and Africa. Most recently  he has been writing successful, award winning, Young Adult books, the latest Hippie Chick. Back in 1991 he wrote The Viper Tree set in Ouagodougou, Burkina Faso. Now he has written a big romance about two adults who meet while kayaking on Maine’s Allagash River and fall deeply in love. The two approach life with the same sense of adventure they use to conquer the river’s treacherous rapids. This is a warm love story where two “soul mates” meet by chance, fall perfectly and completely in love, but quickly learn their time together is fated . . .

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