Archive - August 29, 2019

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Martin Ganzglass (Somalia) publishes THE PRICE OF FREEDOM — #6 of a series
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A Writer Writes — “Punch” a Short Story by Chris Honore’ (Colombia)

Martin Ganzglass (Somalia) publishes THE PRICE OF FREEDOM — #6 of a series

    About The Price of Freedom  Number 6 in the series of novels about the American Revolution by Martin R. Ganzglass (Somalia 1966–68)   The Price of Freedom is my sixth and final novel in a series on the American Revolution. The first book, Cannons for the Cause, begins in the brutal winter of 1775 when the principal character, fifteen-year-old Will Stoner and his teamster father, are engaged to haul heavy cannons from Lake George, New York to Cambridge, Massachusetts, as part of Colonel Henry Knox’s “Noble Train of Artillery.” This last novel begins after the crucial victory at Yorktown in October 1781, and ends in the summer of 1784 in liberated New York City when Patriots and former Loyalists begin to overcome their wartime differences. The underlying theme throughout the series is the important role ordinary people, including the “invisible minorities” — African Americans, women and Native Americans — played . . .

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A Writer Writes — “Punch” a Short Story by Chris Honore’ (Colombia)

    PUNCH by Chris Honore’ (Colombia 1967-69)   For a time, my family and I lived in Watson, a small farming town in California’s Central Valley – flat, nondescript, a sepia photograph slightly out of focus. Everyday I walked to school and back along dusty, rutted roads bordered by wide irrigation ditches usually filled with green-brown water. The water was controlled by a series of concrete locks that could be opened by turning upright, wire-spoked wheels allowing the water to flood out into the fields, sluicing along parched rows of cotton. In late spring and all through the relentless summer, we swam in the water nearest the locks where it was deepest, diving off the concrete abutments, splashing one another, whooping and hollering, playing like young seals. One hot day in late May, I was walking home with Ben and his younger brother, Marshall, who everyone called Punch. Except . . .

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