Archive - January 2016

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More Links about Benghazi attack
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Tino Calabia (Peru1963-65) Comments on "13 Hours: the Secret Soldiers of Benghazi"
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A mayor, a liberal lion, and a moment of tears
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The New Yorker Features George Packer (Togo 1982-83) Pieces From the Magazine
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Harris Wofford Interview With Bill Moyers at New York Main Library
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I Was Raped in Burkina Faso
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Peggy Anderson, 77, author of bestseller NURSE, died Sunday, January 17, 2016
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Upcoming Events for the Gearan Arts Center on HWS Campus
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Dave Roberts (Liberia PCV) Hiking Through Retirement
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Bryn Mooser (Gambia 2001-03) Body Team 12 Nominated for Oscar Documentary

More Links about Benghazi attack

Thank you Tino Calabia for your penetrating review of “13 Hours.”Here are links that give more  information about the horrendous attack. The “brave soldiers” of the Benghazi movie were EX military. They had jobs as contract security for the CIA. Here is what their CIA boss says about the movie: https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/former-cia-chief-in-benghazi-challenges-film-version-of-2012-attack/2016/01/15/9cf2defc-baf7-11e5-b682-4bb4dd403c7d_story.html Here is what the heartbroken father of Ambassador Stevens pleaded: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2218117/Father-Ambassador-Chris-Stevens-says-abhorrent-play-politics-sons-death-Benghazi.html Here is  career foreign service officer Gregory Hicks’s testimony before Congress. Hicks recounts that he was in charge of the Embassy in Tripoli because Ambassador Stevens had gone to the Benghazi outpost on 9/11. Hicks  knew that embassies in the Mid East were being attacked.Yet, at the end of his work day, he retired to his villa and was watching TV. He missed two cell phone calls from Ambassador Stevens. http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2013/05/08/transcript-whistle-blower-account-sept-11-libya-terror-attack.html

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Tino Calabia (Peru1963-65) Comments on "13 Hours: the Secret Soldiers of Benghazi"

Most RPCVs, new Volunteers, and staff know of RPCV Christopher Stevens’ model service as a PCV and then a U.S. Ambassador until he was slain in Libya in 2012.  Many may be curious to see how Hollywood would portray him.  Now we know.  In “13 Hours: the Secret Soldiers of Benghazi” Stevens is, in Hollywood-speak, “a bit player.” Nonetheless, “This is a true story” declares a typed preface rolling at the film’s start.  The name of Libya’s second biggest city has become an epithet of scorn meant by many to besmirch Hillary Clinton’s record as President’s Obama’s first Secretary of State.  The killing of Stevens and three colleagues had fanned the partisan flames of the 2012 Presidential campaign, and surely those flames will flare up again before this year’s Presidential election is over.  But little in this movie can be easily argued to derail Hillary Clinton’s campaign. The reason?  “13 Hours . . . .

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A mayor, a liberal lion, and a moment of tears

Mayor Kenney (right) speaks with former U.S. Sen. Harris Wofford during the opening ceremony for the 21st annual Greater Philadelphia Martin Luther King Day of Service at Girard College on Jan. 18, 2016. by Maria Panaritis If you thought public office would make Philadelphia’s new boss less Jimmy and more Mayor, think again. Kenney, the former longtime City Councilman whose sleeve and heart are famously one and the same, had a moment that nearly brought him to tears the other day in front of a large crowd of onlookers. It happened at Girard College as Kenney stood on stage with a smorgasboard of other political VIPs for the 21st annual Martin Luther King Day of Service. Dignitary after dignitary approached the podium to reflect on the legacy of the slain civil rights leader. As they did, Kenney seemed thrilled to be standing next to one of his heroes, former U.S. Sen. . . .

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The New Yorker Features George Packer (Togo 1982-83) Pieces From the Magazine

A selection of stories from The New Yorker’s archive George Packer’s World In late 2008, George Packer drove around Florida, one of the places where the financial crisis began. He wanted to understand how the state had become the foreclosure capital of America, and what the “diagram of moral responsibility” looked like. It was shaped, he wrote in “The Ponzi State,” like an inverted pyramid, “with the lion’s share belonging to the banks, mortgage lenders, regulators, and politicians at the top.” The race to build more and more subdivisions-even when the people buying them clearly couldn’t afford them-was essentially a confidence game, with “everyone involved both being taken and taking someone else.” A George Packer piece, whether it is about the housing crisis or Silicon Valley, always provides readers with the rhetorical equivalent of a panoramic shot.These big-picture moments, however, are paired with intimate portraits of individual lives. In “The . . .

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Harris Wofford Interview With Bill Moyers at New York Main Library

​Over 180 friends and colleagues of Harris Wofford packed the Celeste Bartos Forum of the New York Public Library last week for a conversation with Harris and Bill Moyers, and a special preview of the documentary being made about Harris’s life.  Generous donations are helping with the goal of completing the film in time for Harris’s 90th birthday this April, but more support is still needed.  You can contribute online here:supportwofforddoc.splashthat.com.

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I Was Raped in Burkina Faso

Jezebel is a feminist blog. This piece by RPCV Yaara Zaslow was published on the site a few days ago. It is a profound and powerful account of what happened to her in Burkina Faso. It is also a sad story of what can happen to women in the Peace Corps. I’d served in Burkina Faso in West Africa with the United States Peace Corps. I was raped, and because I did everything “right” afterwards-I talked to the Peace Corps, talked to the Embassy, completed a rape kit-I didn’t understand the nausea that came over me whenever I did anything aside from hide in my bed. Soon after, I was evacuated from the country with a canvas backpack and a change of clothes. I stayed home, in Seattle, for three months, while the Peace Corps did a full investigation. In this investigation, the Peace Corps noted the three broken locks . . .

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Peggy Anderson, 77, author of bestseller NURSE, died Sunday, January 17, 2016

Peggy Anderson (Togo 1962-64) who wrote a national best-seller about the life of a big-city hospital nurse, died Sunday, January 17, 2017. Ms. Anderson, a former Inquirer writer and copy editor, was in Penn Medicine’s hospice unit in Center City. She had been diagnosed with lung cancer nearly seven years ago. It went into remission, but returned last year and spread, said Mary Walton, a longtime friend. In 1978, Ms. Anderson achieved great success with her book Nurse: The True Story of Mary Benjamin, R.N. Ms. Anderson, whose mother was a nurse, spent two months trying to find someone who would best serve as the focus of her book. That person turned out to be Mary Fish, who was a head nurse at Pennsylvania Hospital. Fish agreed, but was skeptical that readers would care. “This book isn’t going to go anywhere,” she recalled thinking at the time. “Nobody is going to . . .

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Upcoming Events for the Gearan Arts Center on HWS Campus

On Saturday, January 23, guests will gather at the Gearan Center for a ribbon-cutting ceremony as well as dozens of dedications celebrating donors at their namesake spaces within the building. An open house for members of the greater Geneva community will be held a week later on Saturday, January. 30. EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED.

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Dave Roberts (Liberia PCV) Hiking Through Retirement

The NYTIMES headline in the Business Section of Saturday, January 16, 2016, got my attention. “Goodbye, Golf Clubs. Hello, Hiking Boots and Kayak.” What? That would upset a hacker like me. And the first two paragraph read: They call him “Elusive,” at least on the hiking trails. And that’s pretty much where Dave Roberts spends his time these days, crisscrossing the country by foot, bike, even by kayak.” Mr. Roberts, a retired teacher and software engineer, is on a mission to navigate the United States powered only by his two legs and two arms. Hotels and lodges are out of the question; he camps out aat night and lugs 25 pounds of equipment –including his tent, sleeping bag and food–on his back. The article is focused on what people are doing in retirement, and Roberts is the first one profiled. He had first been a PCV in Liberia in the . . .

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Bryn Mooser (Gambia 2001-03) Body Team 12 Nominated for Oscar Documentary

Bryn Mooser is the Co-founder of RYOT, a media company based in Los Angeles. Mooser was Country Director for Artists for Peace and Justice (APJ) and helped build Haiti’s largest Cholera center as well as APJ’s secondary school in Port-au-Prince, which now educates 2,400 Haitian youth per year. Before working in Haiti, Bryn served in the Peace Corps in West Africa. Bryn is also an award-winning documentary film maker. His first three documentary shorts, Sun City Picture House, Baseball In The Time Of Cholera and The Rider And The Storm, premiered at TriBeCa Film Festival three years in a row. He was named one of Esquire Magazine’s “Americans of the Year” for his work in Haiti and a “Hollywood Maverick” by Details Magazine for “raising guerrilla-style docs to the level of art.” Body Team 12 In Monrovia, Liberia, Garmai Sumo is the only female member of Body Team 12, one . . .

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