Archive - June 4, 2015

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Response from Peace Corps on Mefloquine
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Andrew Oerke (PCstaff: Tanzania, Uganda, Malawi, Jamaica 1966-71) receives 2015 William Meredith Award for Poetry

Response from Peace Corps on Mefloquine

There is much concern, as reported here on the risk/benefits of the use of mefloquine as a anti-malaria  medication for Peace Corps Volunteers.  It is important to raise awareness in the Peace Corps community about this issue. Here is the letter from Dr. Nevin Remington, a leading expert on this medication, to Peace Corps:  text to link to: http://www.remingtonnevin.com/rpcv20150305.pdf RPCVs were urged to read  Dr. Nevin’s letter and review some of the information posted about the drug and then write to Peace Corps Director Carrie Hessler-Radelet urging Peace Corps to accept Dr. Nevin’s recommendations.  See: https://peacecorpsworldwide.org/malaria-mefloquine-and-peace-corps-what-price-protection-part-one/ and https://peacecorpsworldwide.org/malaria-mefloquine-and-peace-corps-what-price-protection-part-two/ In reviewing the following correspondence, it is important to note that Peace Corps is currently being sued by a RPCV over the use of mefloquine. See: John Coyne’s article on the law suit by Sara Thompson: https://peacecorpsworldwide.org/rpcv-sara-thompson/ I would presume that there are legal issues involved that might influence Peace Corps’ public response. I followed my . . .

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Andrew Oerke (PCstaff: Tanzania, Uganda, Malawi, Jamaica 1966-71) receives 2015 William Meredith Award for Poetry

On January 9th, the anniversary of America’s former US Poet Laureate, the 2015 poetry award named for William Meredith was be conferred on Andrew Oerke by the William Meredith Foundation. Oerke who died in 2014, in his lifetime was the CEO of an environmental foundation, president of a microfinance organization, Peace Corps Director, Golden Gloves boxing champion, academic and a poet. “The poet has to write from the real stuff of life, the major concerns of the heart, and of life today,” he has said. Oerke believed that poetry was more than just words on a page, that it is a way of living and perceiving and relating to other people. For them, poetry can be useful in bringing about social justice and serve as a solution for changing the mind and spirit of mankind. “Hunger’s grip is cold stone,” Oerke has written of famine in Africa. “It does not . . .

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