Archive - May 2015

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Ethiopian Immigrant Plans To Join The Peace Corps, Awarded Gates Millennial Scholarship
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Alana DeJoseph (Mali 1992-94) Drinking Tea The Mali Way
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A Mother’s Kept Promise by Rudolph Keith Dunn (Dominican Republic 1990-92)
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Panel Discussion at Thirsters on the Relevance of Peace Corps
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Gerald Karey writes: Neighborhood Dogs
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More on Peace Corps Prep
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Kent Haruf’s (Turkey 1965-67) Last Novel, Days Before His Death
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The One Word That Almost Sunk the Peace Corps
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A Shriver Idea Finds a Home at the Peace Corps
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New books By Peace Corps writers: April 2015

Ethiopian Immigrant Plans To Join The Peace Corps, Awarded Gates Millennial Scholarship

African Immigration Trend Has A Strong Base In D.C. Area WAMU 88.5 By: Armando Trull May 20, 2015 Over the past 40 years, the number of black immigrants coming to the United States has quadrupled. The majority of them have arrived from Jamaica and Haiti, but now the origin countries are changing. Africa is now represented more than ever before. The new trend has already taken hold in D.C., where African immigrants have accounted for much of the growth in the region’s black immigration, says Mark Hugo Lopez, research director at the Pew Research Center, which recently released a study on the data. “The growth in the number of African immigrants, black African immigrants has really been the driver in the growth of the black immigrant population overall, which now stands at 3.8 million,” Lopez says. In the D.C. region almost 15 percent of blacks are foreign born – that’s . . .

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Alana DeJoseph (Mali 1992-94) Drinking Tea The Mali Way

The Barefoot  Mali PCV Alana DeJoseph (Mali 1992-94) A small enterprise development PCV, Alana DeJoseph in Mali was not use to camel, but she did love her afternoon tea and as she says, “combining the two proved to be a bit of a challenge.”

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A Mother’s Kept Promise by Rudolph Keith Dunn (Dominican Republic 1990-92)

Rudolph Keith Dunn (Dominican Republic 1990-92) is a Spanish teacher at Starling International Learning and Childcare Center in Richmond. He also tutors children in creative writing. A former freelance journalist for various newspapers over the years, as well as an ESL instructor with Catholic Charities and a Reading and Writing Tutor with the Richmond Public School system. This story, “A Mother’s Kept Promise” was published in the 2015 March edition of the Linden Avenue Literary Journal. It  won the Virginia Writers Club Literary Competition in 2013. A Mother’s Kept Promise by Rudolph Keith Dunn Roaring flames devoured his mother’s flesh, and the small boy smiled. Achebe noticed the soft brown skin was now black and charred, the delicate nose, full lips, and piercing eyes had disappeared. The beautiful, elegant, form of Ashanti, the envy and pride of her village, was no more than a roasting dark mass of skin, muscle, . . .

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Panel Discussion at Thirsters on the Relevance of Peace Corps

The Columbia River Peace Corps Association, based in Portland, Oregon is promoting a presentation at Thirsters on Thursday, May 28th, 2015. For those of you lucky enough to live in Portland, here is the information from the Columbia River Peace Corps Association’s newsletter: (Columbia is spelled correctly here, it refers to the River, not the country.) “Maria and James Beebe (RPCVs Philippines) are leading a panel discusion at a Thirsters meeting on May 28 on the relevance of Peace Corps. They need volunteers for the panel discussion and help with the short presentations. Please email beebe@gonzaga.edu ( It may be necessary to copy and paste this email address.) Brief introduction to the history of Peace Corps, including the three goals. Brief comments on the contribution to Peace Corps of Robert Textor, the founder of Thirsters, Brief comments on the current status of Peace Corps and the local Columbia River Peace Corps . . .

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Gerald Karey writes: Neighborhood Dogs

Neighborhood Dogs by Gerald Karey (Turkey 1965-67) • POODLES, I THINK, were bred to be work dogs, although I’m uncertain what work they did. They were not intended to be primped, pampered and coiffed to within an inch of their dog lives, trimmed of most hair except for little puffs at their paws, rumps, shoulders and tails, and minced around at dog-shows like some foppish dandy at the French royal court. That’s no way to treat a dog. Adding insult to injury, recently I saw a tricked-out poodle in the neighborhood whose owner (and surely it wasn’t the dog’s decision), dyed each of those puffs of hair orange shading into purple. I was tempted to round on him (the owner, not the dog), accuse him of animal cruelty (or at least deep humiliation), and call the animal control agency and have the dog taken away. I didn’t, of course. The . . .

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More on Peace Corps Prep

Clayton Kennedy (El Salvador 2010-12) who is, he informed me, “just an outreach specialist, not the director of University Partnerships” Sorry, Clayton, I just wanted to give your CV a boost). Also, Clayton tell me, “Peace Corps Prep and Campus Ambassadors have both been in the Office of Diversity and National Outreach, where I have worked since my arrival last June. However, these two programs and I are transitioning over to the Office of University Partnerships, which is simultaneously coming over to VRS. The position of the Director of University Partnerships is currently open and just about to be posted.” Okay, are we all thoroughly confused by this Washington gobbledygook? Good. But what (in simple plain English) is how you would describe Peace Corps Prep? I asked Clayton who was nice enough to reply, “Peace Corps Prep is a partnership program that prepares undergraduate students for intercultural service abroad. We provide . . .

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Kent Haruf’s (Turkey 1965-67) Last Novel, Days Before His Death

In the Friday, 15, 2015, issue of the WSJ writer Jennifer Maloney has a long and touching article entitled, “A Dying Writer’s Last Chapter” that is about Kent Haruf (Turkey 1965–67) and the novel he completed days before his death, Our Souls at Night. In the novel, Kent explores a highly personal story: finding love late in life. We reviewed the novel on this site several months ago. Take a look at the review by Tony D’Souza (Ivory Coast 2000–02, Madagascar 2002–03). Kent grew up in a steel-mill town in Colorado and went to Nebraska Wesleyan University in Lincoln where he (like many writers) discovered Faulkner and Hemingway. He studied English and then joined the Peace Corps. It was in Turkey that he started writing short stories and while there he applied for admission to the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. He was rejected by them. He got a job. He got . . .

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The One Word That Almost Sunk the Peace Corps

THE ONE WORD THAT ALMOST SUNK THE PEACE CORPS BY EMILY CADEI OZY Writer MAY 15, 2015 When John F. Kennedy asked young Americans in 1960 how many of them were willing to spend years in the developing world “working for freedom,” he surely had people like Marjorie Michelmore in mind. What he couldn’t have anticipated is how the young Marjorie almost sent his whole vision for the Peace Corps up in smoke. Michelmore had just graduated magna cum laude from Smith College when she was selected for the inaugural class of Peace Corps volunteers in 1961. It was a pet project of Kennedy’s, a concept he first broached at a morning campaign rally at the University of Michigan in October 1960, after arriving several hours late. Thousands of students had waited for him – a sign of how much Kennedy excited young people back then. And he, in turn, was excited to . . .

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A Shriver Idea Finds a Home at the Peace Corps

Peace Corps Prep– Shriver & Clayton Kennedy “The Peace Corps is a way in which American students can put their studies of other cultures to effective use. The problem, therefore, is how to channel these students toward Peace Corps service. It would be of immeasurable help to the Peace Corps if the colleges and universities of this country would institute a Peace Corps preparatory program in which students could enroll before their service with us. In most schools this would merely be bringing together in one package of already existing courses. In others it could mean the establishment of new courses of instruction….” Sargent Shriver Institute of Higher Education Board Nashville, Tennessee July 24, 1961 The head of an office at the Peace Corps called the Office of University Partnerships is Clayton Kennedy, an RPCV who is developing the Peace Corps Prep Program. What, you ask, is the Peace Corps Prep . . .

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New books By Peace Corps writers: April 2015

To purchase any of these books from Amazon.com, click on the book cover, the bold book title, or the publishing format you would like — and Peace Corps Worldwide, an Amazon Associate, will receive a small remittance that will help support the site and the annual Peace Corps Writers awards. • Breathing the Same Air: A Peace Corps Romance by Gerry Christmas (Thailand 1973–76; Western Samoa 1976–78) Lulu April 2015 366 pages $22.99 (paperback) • Keepers Meet Questing Eyes (Poems) by John Michael Flynn (Moldova 1993-95) Leaf Garden Press July  2014 120 pages $6.08 (paperback) • Never Forgotten: Teaching in Rebellious Eritrea 1965-1967 & Returning After 35 Years by Paul E. Huntsberger (Ethiopia 1965–67) LifeRichPublishing October 2014 192 pages $14.95 (paperback) • Shocking Paris: Soutine, Chagall and the Outsiders of Montparnasse by Stanley Meisler (PC/W staff 1964-67 evaluation/research) Palgrave Macmillan April 2015 256 pages $26.00 (hard cover), $12.99 (paperback) • The . . .

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