Archive - April 2014

1
The Shot "Heard Around the World" Still Echoes at the Masters
2
Review — THE EARLY YEARS OF PEACE CORPS IN AFGHANISTAN by Frances and Will Irwin
3
Carrie Hessler-Radelet at CWA Conference in Boulder, Colorado
4
Just One Small Tattoo by Chris Honore’ (Colombia 1967-69)
5
Marty Ganzglass (Somalia 1966–68) publishes CANNONS FOR THE CAUSE with Peace Corps Writers
6
Congress Petitions FBI For More Active Role in Peace Corps Murder Investigation
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Authors Guild Proposes National Digital Library of Out of Print Books
8
What's On The Web About The Peace Corps
9
Hal Brun (Sri Lanka 1969-71) special education leader, 1947-2013
10
If you are in Oregon, Near Oregon City

The Shot "Heard Around the World" Still Echoes at the Masters

The Shot “Heard Around the World” Still Echoes at the Masters Now that we are back at the Masters for 2014, it is time to remember the great players, great shots, and great Masters. This is the one tournament of the year that brings golf home to the masses.  And much of it is because of Gene Sarazen, the second Masters held in 1935, and the “shot heard around the world”. Gene Sarazen is, in many ways, the most unlikely of golf heroes. In fact, his name wasn’t even Gene Sarazen. He was born Eugenio Saraceni, but changed it because, as he said, his real name sounded more like that of a violinist. Gene Sarazen sounded like a golfer. Sarazen came into golf, as did so many early professionals, from the caddie ranks. At the age of eight, the son of a struggling carpenter from Harrison, New York, he took . . .

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Review — THE EARLY YEARS OF PEACE CORPS IN AFGHANISTAN by Frances and Will Irwin

The Early Years of Peace Corps in Afghanistan: A Promising Time By Frances Hopkins Irwin (Afghanistan 1964–67) and Will A Irwin (Afghanistan 1965–67) Peace Corps Writers Book 294 pages $17.00 (paperback), $6.00 (Kindle) February 2014 Reviewed by John Sumser (Afghanistan 1977-78) What struck me as I read the Irwin’s account of the early days of the Peace Corps in Afghanistan is how little anything changed. The problems faced by the initial Volunteers and their director (then called a “representative”) were the same as those faced by my cohort fifteen years later: What is the proper role of a Volunteer? Is the Peace Corps a CIA front? Should Volunteers have servants? What should our social lives look like? I felt, after reading the book, that the Peace Corps is never established anywhere as much as it is continuously invented and negotiated on a daily, face-to-face basis. The Irwins have created an . . .

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Carrie Hessler-Radelet at CWA Conference in Boulder, Colorado

66 Annual Conference on World Affairs April 7-11, 2014 [Originally founded in 1948 as a forum on international affairs, the CWA expanded rapidly in its early years to encompass the arts, media, science, diplomacy, technology, environment, spirituality, politics, business, medicine, human rights, and so on. Roger Ebert, who participated in the CWA for four decades, always referred to the CWA as “the Conference on Everything Conceivable.”] 1461 Gender Equity: Women Leaning In 12:30-1:50 on Monday April 7, 2014 Old Main Chapel Panelists: Stacie Nevadomski Berdan Carrie Hessler-Radelet Mary V. Hughes Alicia Robb Moderator: Antonio Papuzza 2162 Humanitarianism: Handouts and Bootstraps 9:30-10:50 on Tuesday April 8, 2014 UMC West Ballroom Panelists: Carrie Hessler-Radelet Tori Hogan Sarah Holewinski Judith Morrison Moderator: Elizabeth Dunn 2465 One Person in the Right Place Can Change the World 12:30-1:50 on Tuesday April 8, 2014 Old Main Chapel Panelists: Carrie Hessler-Radelet Tori Hogan Trey Lyons Judithe Registre Moderator: Sandra Brodie . . .

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Just One Small Tattoo by Chris Honore’ (Colombia 1967-69)

Chris Honore’ was born in occupied Denmark, during WWII. After the war, he immigrated to America. He went to public schools and then attended San Jose State University and the University of California, at Berkeley, where he earned a teaching credential, an M.A. and a Ph.D. After teaching high school English for two years, he joined the Peace Corps. He’s a freelance journalist based in Ashland, Oregon. His wife owns a bookstore on Main Street. His son is a cinematographer, living in Southern California. • JUST ONE SMALL TATTOO by Chris Honore’ The shoulder in question? Smooth as a baby’s bottom. Unblemished, lightly tanned and oh so nice. That would be Jenny’s shoulder. The one I’d fallen in love with. And, of course, all that was attached thereto. Jenny and I were lying on the grass in the park across the street from our high school, me on my stomach, . . .

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Marty Ganzglass (Somalia 1966–68) publishes CANNONS FOR THE CAUSE with Peace Corps Writers

Marty writes: Cannons for the Cause is a novel about the early days of the American Revolution. It is a gripping story of friendships formed, families divided, first loves, and of loyalty, courage and patriotism. In the brutal winter of 1775-1776, sixteen year old Will Stoner is one of many teamsters hauling heavy cannons more than 300 miles from Ft. Ticonderoga in upstate New York to Cambridge, Massachusetts. The train of wagons and sleds struggles across the partially frozen Hudson River and through a blizzard in the steep Berkshire mountains, to bring the desperately needed artillery to General Washington, preparing to attack the British in Boston. Cannons for the Cause places Will in the midst of actual, but little known,  historical events — a race riot in Cambridge between the Marblehead Mariners, the first integrated unit of the Continental Army, and a militia of backwoods riflemen; and the stealthy night . . .

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Congress Petitions FBI For More Active Role in Peace Corps Murder Investigation

[Thanks to Joanne Roll for her ‘heads up’ on this item from ABC News] Congressional leaders are calling on U.S. government officials to be more active in solving the case of Kate Puzey, the Peace Corps volunteer who was brutally murdered in the West African country of Benin five years ago. Today, in a show of bi-partisan support, 184 members of Congress signed a letter requesting the government “make every effort to devote every resource to achieve justice for Kate Puzey.” Puzey was a 24-year-old from Georgia who was killed on March 12, 2009 after she claimed a local Peace Corps employee was sexually abusing girls at the school where she taught. “It continues the visibility of the case in the eyes of the people that need not to lose sight of the tragedy,” said Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-GA, a co-author of the letter and advocate for the Puzey family. . . .

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Authors Guild Proposes National Digital Library of Out of Print Books

Jan Constantine, General Counsel of the Authors Guild, testified before the House Judiciary Committee yesterday afternoon on mass digitization of books and so-called orphan works. Those topics, of course, are at the heart of two Guild lawsuits, Authors Guild v. Google and Authors Guild v. HathiTrust. An advance copy of Jan’s written testimony is available on their blog. Here are three highlights: 1. We’re proposing that Congress empower the creation of a collective licensing organization (something like ASCAP or BMI) to deal with both mass digitization and “orphan” books. Such an organization would pave the way for a true national digital library, but it would have to be limited in scope, just as ASCAP is. Here are the key components: A. Authors get paid for the uses, naturally. B. Licenses would be non-compulsory. Authors get to say no. C. Licenses would cover out-of-print books only. No disrupting commercial markets. D. Display uses only. . . .

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What's On The Web About The Peace Corps

[Surfing the web the other day for ‘Peace Corps Information’, I came up with this site:henrymakow.com. There are a lot of crazies out there, and this is one place where they gather. For the purposes of ‘lets sigh and shake our collective heads’ here is what someone named David Richard has to say on Henry Makow’s site about the fate of women in the Peace Corps. By the way, Henry Makow is a Canadian author, campaigner against homosexuality, public opponent of Zionism and Freemasonry, conspiracy theorist and the inventor of the boardgame Scruples. If you look into Makow’s philosophy, you’ll find that he believes a hidden hand is shaping modern history. He thinks democracy today serves as an instrument of social control; the mass media generally stifles information and channels thought; and popular entertainment degrades us and diverts the audience from what is really happening. His anti-homosexual, and anti New . . .

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Hal Brun (Sri Lanka 1969-71) special education leader, 1947-2013

Hal Brun (Sri Lanka 1969-71) special education leader, 1947-2013 Educator had ‘huge appetite for life’ January 05, 2014| By Joan Giangrasse Kates While a Peace Corps Volunteer in Sri Lanka, Hal Brun was assigned to teach English to villagers, some of them children with severe disabilities who had been deemed unteachable. With little formal training, Mr. Brun developed a special education program for teaching these children and put into place a system to help them attend local schools. “Hal understood that everything begins with an education,” said his partner of 30 years, Jeff Ginsberg. “That this was the starting point to giving these kids their best shot at life.” Upon his return to the U.S., Mr. Brun launched a long career in education, including several years as the director of special education at New Trier High School in Winnetka. “He was the kind of leader that inspired others to do . . .

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