Archive - August 6, 2013

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Review of The Liberia One Storybook
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Early Peace Corps Staffer Jules Pagano Dies in Jamesville, New York

Review of The Liberia One Storybook

The Liberia One Storybook The First Peace Corps Volunteers to Liberia Tell Their Stories Edited by Geraldine Kennedy (1962-64) Clover Park Press, $22 114 pages 2012 Reviewed by Casey Frazee (South Africa, 2009) Those interested in far-off places will relish in the rich descriptions of life in the Liberia of the mid-1900s, before the late 20th century civil war broke out and closed the Peace Corps program there for nearly 20 years. Volunteers who served in Liberia in the pioneering group are lucky to have a formalized account of their time spent learning how to speak, cook, and live like their West African counterparts. A small, fertile country situated on the western coast of Africa, curving southeast along the Atlantic Ocean, Liberia is a country with a rich, tumultuous history. The country was founded by freed black American slaves in the early 19th century. That history of liberation, optimism and . . .

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Early Peace Corps Staffer Jules Pagano Dies in Jamesville, New York

Mad Man Jules Pagano Jules Pagano was not a Mad Man, though he could have played one on the t.v. show. Yes, he smoked. God, they all smoked! And drank! And partied!  Jules was more of a character actor than a Leading Man at the early Peace Corps and spent his years there as  Chief of the Division of Professional and Technical Affairs. (Yes, Virginia, they did have stupid titles like that even in the ’60s.) Jules had a breezy, laid-back, amusing, and charming persona. He was like great poetry: there was more than one level of meaning to Jules. And like a good union organizer (which he had been) he held his cards close to his chest. If anyone could draw to an inside straight, it was Jules Pagano. I knew Jules best for a short period in the spring of 1965 when he organized the unions segment for . . .

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