Archive - April 2013

1
RPCV Chase Adam (Costa Rica 2010-11) Third Goal Achievement
2
Star Review in PW for Laurence Leamer's (Nepal 1964-66) The Price of Justice
3
Early Director to Philippines, Dr. Lawrence Fuchs, Dies at 86
4
Letters From Nurses in the Peace Corps – 1967
5
Review of Laurence Leamer's (Nepal 1964-66)The Price of Justice
6
Front Page of NYTIMES–Self Publishing
7
Mad Men & Women at the Peace Corps
8
Review — VOLUNTEERS IN THE AFRICAN BUSH by David Read Barker (Sierra Leone)
9
More About The Mad Men and Women of the Peace Corps
10
Chic Dambach (Colombia 1967-69) Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow

RPCV Chase Adam (Costa Rica 2010-11) Third Goal Achievement

[Thanks to Mary-Ann Tirone Smith (Cameroon 1965-67) who mentioned this New York Times article that I had missed. Here it is. Another RPCV doing great Third Goal work on his own.] Jim Wilson/The New York Times Chase Adam, 26, a former Peace Corps volunteer, is the founder of Watsi. By NICOLE LaPORTE, The New York Times April 13, 2013 TWO YEARS AGO, Chase Adam, a Peace Corps volunteer in Costa Rica, was riding a bus through a town called Watsi, when a woman got on board asking for money. Her son, she said, needed medical attention and she couldn’t pay for it. As the woman walked through the bus, she showed people a copy of her son’s medical record. Mr. Adam, who is now 26, noticed that nearly everyone donated money. Watsi raised money for Chenda, top, a 1-year-old boy in Cambodia, who badly burned his hand. Nuro, 11, of . . .

Read More

Star Review in PW for Laurence Leamer's (Nepal 1964-66) The Price of Justice

Publisher’s Weekly in their March 18,2013, carried a starred review of The Price of Justice: A True Story of Greed and Corruption Leamer’s newest is the riveting and compulsively readable tale of the epic battle between Don Blankenship, the man who essentially ran the West Virginia coal industry through his company Massey Energy, and two seemingly ordinary attorneys: Bruce Stanley and David Fawcett.  The centerpiece of the story is a West Virginia mine owner whom Blankenship purposefully bankrupted and on whose behalf Stanley and Fawcett won(in 2002) a $50 million verdict that is still unpaid.  In hope of having the ruling overturned by the West Virginia Supreme Court, Blankenship sought to “buy” a seat on the court by contributing over $3 million to the successful campaign of a conservative judicial candidate.  However, the U.S. Supreme Court eventually found the Blankenship’s contributions were too much to allow the new West Virginia . . .

Read More

Early Director to Philippines, Dr. Lawrence Fuchs, Dies at 86

[I received this email from Marcia Kauffman Krasnow saying that Lawrence Fuchs, the first Peace Corps Director in the Philippines, has died. Fuchs in 1961-62 had one third of all the Volunteers in the world. It was the largest Peace Corps country. Philippines, in fact, was the test-case for Warren Wiggins paper, The Towering Task, the original document that Shriver used to create the agency. Following is Ms. Krasnow’s email to me, and the death notice about Professor Fuchs.] Dear John Coyne, I enjoyed meeting you at the 50th Anniversary events in Washington, D. C.  I am the daughter of the late Dr. Joseph F. Kauffman who was the first Chief of the Peace Corps Division of Training at the Peace Corps Headquarters in Washington, D.C. (1961-63) Both Prof. Fuchs and my father (Dean of Students) were at Brandeis University (outside of Boston) prior to serving in leadership positions in the Peace Corps.  . . .

Read More

Letters From Nurses in the Peace Corps – 1967

“Letters from Nurses in the Peace Corps” is a remarkable document that Peace Corps once preserved and is now no longer available. (5/7/18)The booklet records some 12 letters from Peace Corps nurses serving during the 1960s. The letters are comprehensive and give detailed descriptions of where the nurses were working, the problems they encountered and how they were solving those problems.  Evidently, the booklet was used for recruiting purposes. One hopes that it also was used to evaluate and improve programs. The nurses write as individuals, but all refer to their groups. They also speak of the “girls”. Remember, back in the 60s, we were all girls! Here are some excerpts from those letters. Gail Singer –  Niger, reported ” In my student days…we heard over and over again how a nurse must be practical, adaptable and creative; how she could carry the basic principles of cleanliness, sterility, and ingenuity . . .

Read More

Review of Laurence Leamer's (Nepal 1964-66)The Price of Justice

The Price of Justice: A True Story of Greed and Corruption Laurence Leamer (Nepal 1964–66) Times Books 412 Pages $30.00 (hardcover); $14.99 (Kindle) May 2013 Reviewed by Tony D’Souza (Ivory Coast 2000–02, Madagascar 2002–03) COAL HAS LONG BEEN A METAPHOR in our culture for the dark seed inside the greedy soul; the color of it, its hardness, all that compressed, combustible power. The pits where it’s dug are among our most basic conceptions of hell. “It’s dark as a dungeon,” Johnny Cash sings in his song of the same name, “damp as the dew/danger is double/pleasures are few/It’s dark as a dungeon way down in the mine.” Larry Leamer in his new book, The Price of Justice: A True Story of Greed and Corruption, discovers something even darker; the heart of a West Virginia coal executive whose lust for union busting, corporate expansion and profit leads to the deaths of . . .

Read More

Front Page of NYTIMES–Self Publishing

[This piece on self publishing and the link between authors and agents is a must read for writers. The agent mention, Trident, is my literary agency so I had particular interest in the piece.] April 16, 2013 New Publisher Authors Trust: Themselves By LESLIE KAUFMAN When the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and author David Mamet released his last book, “The Secret Knowledge: On the Dismantling of American Culture,” with the Sentinel publishing house in 2011, it sold well enough to make the New York Times best-seller list. This year, when Mr. Mamet set out to publish his next one, a novella and two short stories about war, he decided to take a very different path: he will self-publish. Mr. Mamet is taking advantage of a new service being offered by his literary agency, ICM Partners, as a way to assume more control over the way his book is promoted. “Basically I . . .

Read More

Mad Men & Women at the Peace Corps

I got an email the other day from David Raphael who was a college student back in 1962 and worked as an intern at the Peace Corps HQ.  My piece on Nan McEvoy got him thinking about the ‘other’ women in the building when he arrived in Washington from Antioch College in the summer of ’62. He was assigned to the Africa Regional Office and worked with, he said, two real power houses: Cynthia Courtney, English-speaking Africa Division Director, and Francesca Gobi, French-speaking Africa Division Director. David said that these women, and others in the Africa Regional Office, were all recruited from the Africa American Institute (AAI), which years later was exposed by Ramparts magazine as being a CIA front. Little did we know! I met Cynthia Courtney in the late summer of ’62 when I returned from Ethiopia and went to work in the Office of Volunteer Services (DVS). Cynthia was one of the . . .

Read More

Review — VOLUNTEERS IN THE AFRICAN BUSH by David Read Barker (Sierra Leone)

  Volunteers in the African Bush:  Memoirs from Sierra Leone Edited by David Read Barker (Sierra Leone 1965–67) Dog Ear Publishing $15.00 (paperback); $3.99 (Kindle) 163 pages 2013 Reviewed by Andy Trincia (Romania 2002–04) When I was an aspiring young writer — at about age 10 — I decided that I was going to write my first novel and set it in Sierra Leone. I spun my metal globe and that’s where my finger landed. Besides, it was a cool name for a country. I still haven’t written that novel, nor been to Sierra Leone, though I have read memoirs about Ivory Coast and Liberia. That distant memory made me smile when I had a chance to read Volunteers in the African Bush:  Memoirs from Sierra Leone. The book’s editor, David Read Barker, had a lingering question in his head. He wondered if he and his fellow Peace Corps Volunteers . . .

Read More

More About The Mad Men and Women of the Peace Corps

Years ago, inspired by the television program Man Men, I began to do an occasional blog about the early founders of the agency, who I nicknamed, The Mad Men and Women of the Peace Corps. And indeed they were, back then in the early Sixties. From time to time I’d get comments from later PCVs, words to the effect that I get over it Coyne! Those days are long gone. Indeed they are. Still I’m going to document the people, the lives, and the times, as best I can, of those early years of the agency when everyone, and I mean everyone, didn’t give the Peace Corps a chance to survive, let alone thrive and be around so that they–later day PCVs–might have a chance to join an organization that would change their lives, and organization that today is something like Mom’s Apple Pie in the eyes of most Americans. So, keep quiet. I have more to say about . . .

Read More

Chic Dambach (Colombia 1967-69) Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow

The current issue of The Council of Independent Colleges newsletter, Independent has an article entitled, “Campuses Reap Benefits of Hosting Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellows.” In Woodrow Wilson’s current impressive list of Fellows is a senior executive of the Coca-Cola company, a former U.S. ambassador to the Federal Republic of Nigeria, and ‘the former chief of staff for a U.S. Representative from California, our own Charles “Chic” Dambach (Colombia 1967-69). In a brief paragraph on the “Fellows” the article states: “Charles “Chic” Dambach’s wide-ranging career includes serving as chief of staff for U.S. Representative John Garamendi (D-CA) (Ethiopia 1966-68) and six years as president and CEO of the Alliance for Peacebuilding, during which he established a network of organizations and professionals to help built sustainable peace and security worldwide. Previously, Dambach restructured and revitalized the National Peace Corps Association, where his career began as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Colombia. He . . .

Read More

Copyright © 2019. Peace Corps Worldwide.