Archive - August 24, 2011

1
Review of Second Volume (The Americas) of Peace Corps Stories
2
In search of Emily Arsenault (South Africa 2004–06): Upcoming author appearance at R.J. Julia
3
NYTIMES Article Today:A 50-Year Journey for a Proper Farewell

Review of Second Volume (The Americas) of Peace Corps Stories

Gather The Fruit One By One: 50 Years of Amazing Peace Corps Stories:Volume Two, The Americas Edited by Pat Alter (Paraguay 1970–1972) and Bernie Alter (India 1967–1969) Series editor Jane Albritton (India 1967–69) Travelers’ Tales May 2011 314 pages $18.95 Reviewed by Dan Close (Ethiopia 1966–68) GATHER THE FRUIT ONE BY ONE: 50 Years of Amazing Peace Corps Stories: Volume Two, The Americas is the second in the series of four books of essays by Peace Corps Volunteers collected by Jane Albritton and her editors. The remaining volumes cover Africa, Eurasia, and Asia and the Pacific. I met a traveler from a far-off land who said, “Here’s a story for you! Here’s a great story for you. And it’s true. I know, because it happened to me.” Actually, here are forty-six extraordinary tales of life lived in the Americas outside of America. Some are old; some are new. They are . . .

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In search of Emily Arsenault (South Africa 2004–06): Upcoming author appearance at R.J. Julia

By John Valeri, Hartford Books Examiner Arsenault is the author of two novels, and will be appearing at R.J. Julia on Thursday evening.   Her literary debut, The Broken Teaglass, was selected by the New York Times as a Notable Crime Book of 2009.  In addition to her forays into fiction, she has worked as a lexicographer, an English teacher, and a Peace Corps volunteer in South Africa.  Though Arsenault now lives in Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts, she grew up in Connecticut. Her newest, In Search of the Rose Notes (William Morrow, $14.99), was released last month.  Publishers Weekly gave the book a starred review and noted it to be “an emotionally complex and deeply satisfying read.”  Meanwhile, fellow author Alafair Burke praised, “Feels like a beautifully written secret, whispered into the reader’s ear…This is a smart, creative, and utterly charming novel.” Eleven-year-olds Nora and Charlotte were best friends. When their teenage . . .

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NYTIMES Article Today:A 50-Year Journey for a Proper Farewell

A 50-Year Journey for a Proper Farewell By Simon Romero August 23, 2011 MIÁCORA, Colombia – All that remained here, on a drizzle-shrouded ridge in the Chocó jungle, was a rusting cross and some crumpled fuselage. No wonder Gordon Radley feared that the tragedy that took his brother’s life five decades ago was at risk of being lost in the mists of time. Mr. Radley was just 15 when his parents in Chicago were told, in 1962, that a Colombian DC-3 plane had crashed in Chocó, killing more than 30 people, including two Americans. They were the first Peace Corps volunteers to die in service. One was Mr. Radley’s brother, Larry, a 22-year-old graduate of the University of Illinois. Of all the commemorations this year for the 50th anniversary of the Peace Corps, an institution still seen to be grasping for its identity somewhere along the spectrum between altruism and . . .

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