Archive - May 19, 2011

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What about more RPCV women CDs?
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Review of John Coyne's The Caddie Who Won The Masters

What about more RPCV women CDs?

We know that women today make up more than 64% of all Peace Corps Volunteers. Let me ask: how many Country Directors are women? When I was an APCD in Ethiopia we had one, maybe two, women on a staff of 10-12. Today, the number of female staffers is higher, but is it high enough?  With such an increase of female Volunteers, shouldn’t the Peace Corps have the same increase in women CDs? Could it be that if we had more female CD’s there might be fewer complaints that the sexual assaults aren’t being properly investigated by the staff? A friend of mine who is in law enforcement says that as a “general rule” male do not take ‘assault charges’ that seriousely. The Peace Corps must. One way to show we are serious about this issue is to hire more RPCV women as Country Directors. It would, at this moment in the agency’s history, I think, do the Peace Corps a lot of good.

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Review of John Coyne's The Caddie Who Won The Masters

The Caddie Who Won The Masters by John Coyne (Ethiopia 1962–64) Peace Corps Writers $13.50 316 pages 2011 Review by Roland Merullo (Micronesia 1979–80) IN JOHN COYNE’S SPLENDID new golf novel, The Caddie Who Won the Masters, all of the action, from first page to last, takes place at Augusta National Golf Club, site of what is arguably the most famous golf tournament on earth. Because of this, and because of Coyne’s intricate knowledge of the golf course and Masters’ history, Augusta itself shares the spotlight as the book’s main character. For those of us lucky enough to have walked those hallowed grounds, it seems perfectly appropriate that the manicured fairways and slippery greens should leap out of the background of the story and take center stage. The plot revolves around the other main character, Tim Alexander, an aging amateur who earns a Masters’ appearance by virtue of a single . . .

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