Archive - February 25, 2011

1
Review of Meisler's When the World Calls
2
Meisler's Op-Ed in LA Times Friday, February 25, 2011
3
Maureen Orth's LATimes Op-Ed Today, February 25, 2011
4
Washington Post Review of Meisler's Peace Corps Book

Review of Meisler's When the World Calls

When the World Calls: The Inside Story of the Peace Corps and Its First Fifty Years by Stanley Meisler (PC/HQ 1963-67) Beacon Press 272 pages February 2011 Reviewed by Robert B. Textor (PC/HQ 1961-62) STAN MEISLER’S “COMPARATIVE ADVANTAGE” in writing this book is significant. During the mid-Sixties, he served as a member, and later deputy director, of the PC’s Evaluation Division, reporting to the legendary Charlie Peters. This evaluation function was initially conceived by Bill Haddad, one of the PC’s founders. Its purpose was to visit the PCVs in the field, and to identify problems before they became serious, so that corrective and preventive action could be taken. From the beginning, Haddad and Peters stressed that these evaluators should be journalists or lawyers. (It is no accident that Haddad was a journalist, and Peters was a lawyer). Their reports were to be brutally truthful, and interesting to read — and . . .

Read More

Meisler's Op-Ed in LA Times Friday, February 25, 2011

True to the Peace Corps The corps’ celebrity and size may have diminished, but its longevity is a testament to its importance. By Stanley Meisler In some ways, the Peace Corps, which celebrates its 50th anniversary Tuesday, is a shadow of what it once was. It had so much pizzazz in the early days that newspapers proclaimed the names of new volunteers as if they had just won Guggenheim fellowships. Now, the number of volunteers – 8,655 – is about half of what it was at its highest in 1966, and not everyone knows the Peace Corps still exists. The first director – the irrepressible, inspiring Sargent Shriver, who put the program together in six months – made the cover of Time in 1963. The current director – Aaron Williams, a former volunteer with decades of experience in international development – barely gets his name in the papers. At a . . .

Read More

Maureen Orth's LATimes Op-Ed Today, February 25, 2011

latimes.com Op-Ed A Peace Corps volunteer’s journey The Peace Corps set us on a path to a more fulfilling and interesting life. By Maureen Orth February 25, 2011 Twenty years ago I was riding down a dusty road in rural Argentina gabbing in Spanish with a local journalist when suddenly a wave of nostalgia hit me, and I realized why I felt so happy: It was just like being in the Peace Corps again. At the time, I was doing investigative reporting on Argentina’s flamboyant then-President Carlos Menem, but the discussion of local politics and poverty and figuring out how to get the information I wanted was pure Peace Corps. When I served in the 1960s in Medellin, Colombia, as a community development volunteer, I had no thought of becoming a journalist. After my Peace Corps stint, I enrolled in graduate courses in Latin American studies. But they seemed so . . .

Read More

Washington Post Review of Meisler's Peace Corps Book

The Peace Corps at 50 By Steven V. Roberts WHEN THE WORLD CALLS The Inside Story of the Peace Corps and Its First Fifty Years By Stanley Meisler Beacon. 272 pp. $26.95 In 2008 Christiane Amanpour illustrated America’s declining role in the world by telling a foreign policy conference, “There wasa Peace Corps.” After the session a former volunteer named Jon Keeton angrily corrected CNN’s chief foreign correspondent: “There still is a Peace Corps.” As author Stanley Meisler recalls, “Amanpour blushed but pointed out that there must be something wrong if someone like herself did not realize the Peace Corps still existed.” The Peace Corps is a forgotten player today, riding the far end of the government’s bench and seldom getting into a game. Some years ago a State Department document referred to it as the “Peach Corps” and no one caught the error. But the Corps still sent 7,671 . . .

Read More

Copyright © 2019. Peace Corps Worldwide.