Archive - January 29, 2010

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100 Days (Or Less) Part Six: Day One
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Peace Corps Writers awards for books published in 2009

100 Days (Or Less) Part Six: Day One

Day One It is by sitting down to write every morning that one becomes a writer. Those who do not do this remain amateurs. Gerald Brenan Writers write in different ways. Some writers write on computers, others on typewriters, or in long-hand. Agatha Christie said that the best time to plan a book is while you’re doing the dishes. It doesn’t matter how you write. What matters is that you write. What you need to do first in these 100 days is create a routine for your writing. You do this by establishing a specific time to write. This is important because over the course of writing your novel, you will get discouraged, bored, angry, or otherwise fed up, and when you start feeling that way, you’ll need a clearly defined patterns to keep yourself writing. On occasion you may have to shift your writing times to deal with other . . .

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Peace Corps Writers awards for books published in 2009

It is time to nominate your favorite Peace Corps book published in 2009. Send your nomination(s) to John Coyne at: jpcoyne@cnr.edu. You may nominate your own book; books written by friends; books written by total strangers. The books can be about the Peace Corps or on any topic. However, the books must have been published in 2009. The awards will be announced this coming July. Thank you for nominating your favorite book written by a PCV, RPCV or Peace Corps Staff. Paul Cowan Non-Fiction Award First given in 1990, the Paul Cowan Non-Fiction Award was named to honor Paul Cowan, a Peace Corps Volunteer who served in Ecuador. Cowan wrote The Making of An Un-American about his experiences as a Volunteer in Latin America in the sixties. A longtime activist and political writer for The Village Voice, Cowan died of leukemia in 1988. Maria Thomas Fiction Award The Maria Thomas Fiction . . .

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