Archive - August 17, 2009

1
The House On Churchill Road, Part 5
2
A Peace Corps Advisory Committee?

The House On Churchill Road, Part 5

My first two morning classes were with 2E. This was an experimental class. They were at a second year level, but had one less year of schooling. The hope was that if the experiment worked, education could be cut to eleven years, which would enable the Empire to produce more students, quicker. There were twenty-two boys in the class and two girls and they were all bright kids, ranging in age from 15 to 23. The classroom was on the ground floor; it faced the courtyard and when I sat at the teacher’s desk with the door it open, I could see the Haile Selassie bust, the open front gate, and the rush of traffic on Smuts Street. And this is what happened that morning in early October in 1962. The students stood when I walked in and said Tenyais tillin. I answered the same, they asked Indeminadderu? (How did . . .

Read More

A Peace Corps Advisory Committee?

In the very early days of the Peace Corps, Shriver had a “top-level National Advisory Committee” that he saw as being able to “generate public support, and to permit criticism and review by some, he said, “of the best men and women in the field of world development.” Shriver proposed that Johnson be Chairman of this Committee, then added, “His assistant, Bill Moyers, who is keenly interested in the Peace Corps, could serve as the Vice President’s liaison man on this, perhaps as Secretary of the Advisory Committee, thus assuring active concern in the Vice President’s office.” Moyers who, of course, become more important to the Peace Corps than just the secretary of the advisory committee which met regularly in the Peace Corps Office. I remember in the fall of ’64 jumping onto the elevator and joining Janet Leigh, one of the first Peace Corps advisers. (Yes, Janet Leigh, and don’t . . .

Read More

Copyright © 2019. Peace Corps Worldwide.