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NASA should focus on saving Earth–Follow the Peace Corps Example
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Reading About Writing
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Former Peace Corps Director Mark Gearan Back in D.C. With Harvard University
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Library Lovers Chose The Peace Corps As Their Next Chapter
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A Writer Writes — “The Paperboy” by Chris Honore (Colombia)
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Jonathan R. C. Green (Thailand) has published FIGHTING MALARIA ON THE RIVER KWAI
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Peace Corps Documentary World Premier: A TOWERING TASK
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Federal Register has information on Survey of RPCVs by Peace Corps
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David Mather (Chile) publishes THE BILOXI CONNECTION
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“Breaking U.S. immigration laws saved lives in 1975. It gets you arrested today.”

NASA should focus on saving Earth–Follow the Peace Corps Example

Thanks for the “heads up” from Catherine Varchaver (Peace Corps HQ & Kyrgyzstan APCD/Ed & Acting CD 1990-97   Forget new crewed missions in Space. NASA should focus on saving Earth By Lori Garver Washington Post July 23, 2019 Lori Garver is chief executive at Earthrise Alliance and was deputy NASA administrator from 2009 to 2013.   NASA was not created to do something again. It was created to push the limits of human understanding — to help the nation solve big, impossible problems that require advances in science and technology. Fifty years ago, the impossible problem was putting a human on the moon to win the space race, and all of humanity has benefited from the accomplishment. The impossible problem today is not the moon. And it’s not Mars. It’s our home planet, and NASA can once again be of service for the betterment of all. Let’s remember our . . .

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Reading About Writing

Reading About Writing In the Spring 2019 issue of The Authors Guild Bulletin I read a few paragraphs that might interest you on the state of publishing today. In an article entitled Latest Author Income Survey Shows Business of Book Writing in Crisis. “Literary writers experienced the biggest decline in earnings from book-related income (down 27% since 2013), followed by general nonfiction authors (down 8%), raising serious concerns about the future of literature.” In another article entitled Writers on the Brink: The Current Economics of Authorship under the title What’s Driving the Decline? I read: Self-publishing is clearly having a huge impact on author incomes, if for no other reason than that there are more books on the market today than ever before. In 1985, approximately 35,000 books were published in the United States. In 2007, the year the Kindle came onto the market, more than 300,000 titles were published. . . .

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Former Peace Corps Director Mark Gearan Back in D.C. With Harvard University

Dear Friend — I write following our annual summer Celebration of Public Service in Washington, D.C. It was a pleasure to spend time reconnecting with old friends, alumni and students, former and incoming Fellows, and members of our Senior Advisory Committee. Thank you to those of you who were able to join us. We were honored to hear from President Lawrence Bacow, Honorary Chair of the IOP Ambassador Caroline Kennedy, and our student leaders about the importance of public service and the value of their summer internships. In his remarks, President Bacow eloquently spoke to the importance of the IOP’s mission: “The Institute of Politics underscores the reason that Harvard exists. I think this is a responsibility which we all bear, and that the world has never needed committed, active, engaged citizens more than now….this is a time in which good people need to roll up their sleeves and get involved.” . . .

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A Writer Writes — “The Paperboy” by Chris Honore (Colombia)

A Writer Writes   The Paperboy by Chris Honoré (Colombia 1967-69)   My elementary school was called Allendale, a name I never gave much thought to. It was a massive, pale green, two-story Victorian building on a quiet neighborhood street. Two years before I headed off to Jr. High School, I suggested to my folks that being a paperboy would build character, or words to that effect, and solve my financial situation – I was always short of pocket change for, say, a comic or baseball cards wrapped in waxy paper along with a square of pink bubble gum. To sweeten my argument, I pointed out that the newspaper shack, where a cohort of boys gathered each afternoon after school, waiting for the bundles of newspapers to arrive, was less than a block away from Allendale. “Fine,” my parents said, with some reluctance. “Let’s see how it goes.” And so . . .

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Jonathan R. C. Green (Thailand) has published FIGHTING MALARIA ON THE RIVER KWAI

  During World War II, 12,000 Allied prisoners of war died while constructing a bridge over the river Kwai in western Thailand, and then a railway through the thick jungles of the Kwai Valley all the way to Burma. Decades later, during the Vietnam War, Jonathan R.C. Green enlisted as a medic in the U.S. Army, expecting to take care of wounded Americans and Asians, but was kept in a Stateside assignment instead, much to his frustration. So, shortly before his enlistment expired, he applied for the Peace Corps and asked to serve in Southeast Asia. Six weeks after leaving the Army, he arrived in Thailand as a Peace Corps Volunteer. His job assignment was to fight malaria by controlling the mosquito populations in remote jungle villages in the valley of the infamous River Kwai. Besides the hazards posed by snakes, scorpions and centipedes in the jungle, he ran the . . .

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Peace Corps Documentary World Premier: A TOWERING TASK

    Peace Corps Documentary World Premier — A Towering Task: The Peace Corps and a Mission of World Peace   Save the date to join the Peace Corps community for the gala premiere of A Towering Task: The Story of the Peace Corps on September 22nd at The REACH at The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, DC. Watch your inbox in mid-August for details about the premier and how to reserve your tickets. The event will feature Third Goal activities for the whole family and is co-hosted by The Kennedy Center and NPCA. Narrated by Annette Bening, A Towering Task takes viewers on a journey of what it means to be a global citizen from Peace Corps’ founding under John F. Kennedy, through tough times during the Vietnam War and a surprising revival during the Reagan administration, to today’s Peace Corps Volunteers serving at the forefront of some of the most . . .

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Federal Register has information on Survey of RPCVs by Peace Corps

    Thanks for the ‘heads up’ from Joanne Roll (Colombia 1963-65)   The Peace Corps has posted the following notice in the Federal Register to gather public comment on a proposed survey designed to capture information from RPCVs about their post service life, including health status.  Directions on how to post your comment is included in the annoucement.  We will try and get a copy of the proposed online survey.  Here is the notice: “SUMMARY: The Peace Corps will be submitting the following information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (0MB) for review and approval. The purpose of this notice is to allow 60 days for public comment in the Federal Register preceding submission to 0MB. We are conducting this process in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. DATES: Submit comments on or before September 9, 2019. ADDRESSES: Comments should be addressed to Virginia . . .

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David Mather (Chile) publishes THE BILOXI CONNECTION

    David Mather, like many RPCVs, thought that his Peace Corps experience was one-of-a-kind and decided to write about it in novel format. He began writing One For The Road in 2006, and five years later it was published through Peace Corps Writers. It takes place in the foothills of the Andes of southern Chile where he was the most isolated Volunteer in his forestry program, and the novel could well be a primer for new Volunteers.  This literary effort, though, was an epiphany for David: he discovered that he enjoyed writing. A sequel,  When the Whistling Stopped, soon followed. After that, he began “The Crescent Beach Series,” three novels that take place in a fictitious backwater fishing village in the lawless Big Bend Area of Florida’s gulf coast. The Biloxi Connection is the third in the CB series and his fifth novel published through PCW. Mather’s isolated PC experience in . . .

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“Breaking U.S. immigration laws saved lives in 1975. It gets you arrested today.”

    Breaking U.S. immigration laws saved lives in 1975. It gets you arrested today by THURSTON CLARKE (Tunisia 1960) JUL 15, 2019 | 3:05 AM Op-Ed Los Angeles Times    As the Vietnam War caromed to an end, Sister Marie Therese LeBlanc, a middle-aged American nun serving at Friends of the Children of Vietnam orphanage in Saigon, signed one affidavit after another attesting to sons and daughters she never had. It was April 23, 1975, one week before the city fell to the communists. The 36 people LeBlanc claimed as her children were the adult employees of her orphanage and their families. Nevertheless, State Department officials at the evacuation processing center at Tan Son Nhut air base affixed their consular seals to her affidavits, and American airmen added the names she provided to the flight manifests of the Air Force transports flying out of Saigon. They collaborated with her because they . . .

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