Author - Joanne Roll

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The profile of the first group to go to the Philippines in 1961
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Peace Corps Profiles Of First Peace Corps Groups
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Peace Corps Volunteers will go to Viet Nam
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NPCA ISSUES THESE INSTRUCTIONS FOR TOWN HALLS
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UPDATE ON THE NPCA TOWN HALL CONVERSATION TONIGHT
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NPCA WILL CONDUCT A TOWN HALL ON PEACE CORPS AND ITS FUTURE
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RPCV Opinion: “We are the problem.”
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NPCA announces “A Moment to Lean In: Courageous Conversations on Racial Equity in International Service”
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Why Did American University Professor Melillo Ignore Peace Corps Archives?
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Many British volunteers were able to remain in their assignments

The profile of the first group to go to the Philippines in 1961

  PHILIPPINES Peace Corps Volunteers in the Philippines will assist in improving the quality of English spoken in rural areas and in raising teaching standards in both English and general science. They will help Filipino teachers of rural elementary schools teach their students to speak better English and increase understanding of scientific principles. Volunteers will be assigned as educational aides on Filipino teaching staffs in four minor regions. They will supplement, not replace, Filipino teachers. The Philippine Government is urging a general, rapid and comprehensive upgrading of education, especially in rural schools where teaching of  English and science is not yet of sufficiently high standard to prepare pupils for technical study. In the Philippines, English is the language of technology, trade, commerce and culture, but during the last five decades the influence of local languages and dialects has so altered spoken English that it is fast becoming incomprehensible to outsiders. . . .

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Peace Corps Profiles Of First Peace Corps Groups

PEACE CORPS Washington 25, D. C. Descriptions of the first 9 projects, including purpose, training, Volunteer skills needed, technical qualifications of Volunteers, and information about the training officials.   Released November 1, 1961   T    A    B    L    E        0    F        C O N T E N T S   COUNTRY                                                                                 PAGE N0. Chile •    •    •     •   •    •     •     •     •   •     •     •     •             21 Colombia •    •     •     •    •     •    •     •     •     •     •     •          4 Ghana  •    •   •    •    •    •     •    •     •    •     •     •     •           18 India  •     •    •   •   •    •   •    •    •    •    •    •    •                   15 Nigeria •     •     •    •    •     •     •     •    •     •     •    •             27 Pakistan (East and West)  •     . . .

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Peace Corps Volunteers will go to Viet Nam

  from the Peace Corps WASHINGTON – Peace Corps Director Jody K. Olsen attended a reception at the State Department today to celebrate the signing by Viet Nam of the implementing agreement between the Peace Corps and the Ministry of Education and Training to officially establish the Peace Corps program in English education. The event, which also commemorated the 25th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between the United States of America and the Socialist Republic of Viet Nam, included Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs David Hale, Assistant Secretary of State for the Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs David Stilwell, Viet Nam Ambassador to the United States Ha Kim Ngoc and Deputy Chief of Mission Hoang Thi Thanh Nga. Viet Nam will be the 143rd country to host Peace Corps volunteers since the agency was founded in 1961 by President John F. Kennedy. “We are . . .

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NPCA ISSUES THESE INSTRUCTIONS FOR TOWN HALLS

Register for NPCA Town Halls and Peace Corps Connect to the Future Summit We invite members of our community to participate in our Town Halls on July 9-16 and Peace Corps Connect to the Future ideas summit on July 18. To register, login to your NPCA account. (There is a “forgot your password,” option if needed.) You will receive a confirmation email with call in details once you have successfully signed up. Please note: Each session has a separate registration page. You may sign up for as many sessions as you like. All sessions are listed below. To register for each, click on the orange “attending” button with the checkmark by it. A green bar indicating you have successfully registered will now appear at the top of your screen. If you have any problems registering, please contact support@peacecorpsconnect.org.Thursday, July 9 (8 pm EDT) – Peace Corps Funding and Capitol Hill MobilizationSaturday, July 11 (2 pm EDT) – Recruiting the . . .

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UPDATE ON THE NPCA TOWN HALL CONVERSATION TONIGHT

  The event tonight will be on ZOOM, at 8PM to 9:30 PM EDT. You may also participate by phone. To register: https://www.peacecorpsconnect.org/events/peace-corps-connect-for-the-future If you are not a NPCA member, you will be asked to join – there is no cost. When you have registered, you will be brought to a page with a red box. If you have registered, there will be a check in that box, saying “attending”.  Click on the red box with the check.  You should be rewarded with a green banner which says you have successfully registered. You should check your email.  You should have a message from NPCA with instructions on how to sign in to participate. It will have the sign in link and telephone numbers if you wish to call in, instead. I would advise contacting NPCA directly if you follow these instructions, which I doublechecked today, and are having any problems. . . .

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NPCA WILL CONDUCT A TOWN HALL ON PEACE CORPS AND ITS FUTURE

CORRECTION:  The original post did not have the correct information to register.  I apologize for the confusion. Here is the link to register: To register: https://www.peacecorpsconnect.org/cpages/home  All the conversations and the Town Hall will be on ZOOM. The NPCA is inviting all RPCVs to participate in the events leading up to the Town Hall as well as the actual Town Hall. The following is the text of the NPCA announcement. • We’re convening an ideas summit July 18 to ask some crucial questions about the Peace Corps community in a changed world. And as we lead up to that event, from July 8–16 we’re bringing together members of the Peace Corps community for a series of town hall discussions around issues of systemic racism, climate change, and more — to help shape our agenda for the future and ask: What are the big ideas for the Peace Corps going forward? Volunteers worldwide were evacuated because of . . .

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RPCV Opinion: “We are the problem.”

  Tasha Prados is a RPCV, Peru (2011-2013).  She write from her experience in International Development and fighting for racial equality in the United States. The National Peace Corps Association held a conversation about Equity in International Development.  To see the video of that conversation, here is the link:https://www.peacecorpsconnect.org/cpages/home Here is the link to her opinion published by the NPCA   The following is the text of the Tasha Prados article. • We are the problem By Tasha Prados “A second-generation American, I grew up knowing how privileged I was simply by the sheer luck of having been born in the United States. Being multicultural and Latinx, I spent most of my formative years between two worlds, never quite fitting in either, eager to connect more deeply with my Latin American roots. I went to El Salvador with a nonprofit organization for the first time when I was 16 years old . . .

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NPCA announces “A Moment to Lean In: Courageous Conversations on Racial Equity in International Service”

  Please read the following announcement from the NPCA website about this program.  At the end of the announcement there is a link to register. • Now is the time for some tough questions. How do we confront systemic racism as it shapes the work we do — here and around the world? And how do we ensure that our community lives out principles of equity and justice?As part of our commitment to convening‌ ‌conversations‌ ‌around‌ ‌service and‌ ‌opportunity, National Peace Corps Association (NPCA) is joining the Building Bridges Coalition and the International Volunteer Programs Association to host a dialogue about racial equity in international service. Speakers will share their experiences as Black volunteers and staff on service programs, and as organizational leaders with longstanding commitments to institutional and systemic change. Join us for this important dialogue. In the weeks ahead, NPCA is hosting a series of conversations around racial equity. Those will help shape the . . .

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Why Did American University Professor Melillo Ignore Peace Corps Archives?

   by Joanne Roll (Colombia 1963–65) Professor Melillo, Associate Professor at American University,  wrote an article, “How the US Government Sold the Peace Corps to the American Public” See:https://peacecorpsworldwide.org/how-the-us-government-sold-the-peace-corps-to-the-american-public/ She speculated on the motives behind the creation of the Peace Corps and the  reasons Americans volunteered or did not to serve.  Bill Josephson, one of the architects of the Peace Corps and the absolute authority on its early history, wrote a rebuttal to the article. A discussion followed included remarks by Professor Melillo.  See: https://peacecorpsworldwide.org/discussion-on-how-the-us-government-sold-the-peace-corps-to-the-american-public/ I do not understand why Professor  Melillo ignored the Peace Corps Community Archives at American University, where she is an Associate Professor.  The Professor may also have done research at the JFK Library, but she ignored the RPCV Oral History Project archived at the JFK Library. Visit the American University collection. https://blogs.library.american.edu/pcca/?_ga=2.253647113.1870185124.1506009714-1469212090.1469636313 Peace Corps Community Archives AU Library “The Peace Corps Community Archive curated by . . .

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Many British volunteers were able to remain in their assignments

  Thank you to RPCV Alana deJoseph for this announcement from the British Volunteer Service.  Here is the statement of intent from the Volunteer Service Overseas in which British Volunteers work. • “Where it is safe to do so, and in line with national government rules, we will continue to work directly with communities. Volunteers who are already based in communities are key to delivering this approach: our volunteers form deep relationships, built on trust, with the people with whom they work. It’s through these strong relationships that we’re working to tackle the crisis together – ensuring that our response plans are driven by the needs of the people we serve, and using our existing networks to share essential messages. Most of our community and national volunteers have been able to continue their work since the crisis began. Almost half of our international volunteers have continued with their placements; in . . .

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