Archive - May 2014

1
Jason Carter Wins in Georgia
2
Review: Lost Girl Found by Leah Bassoff and Laura DeLuca (Kenya 1987-89)
3
The Peace Corps Now Accepting Applications for Global Health Service Partnership Volunteers for 2015
4
Renewable Resources–The Second Generation
5
“Development Is Down This Road” by Abigail Calkins Aguirre (Cameroon)
6
A Writer Writes: The Boy on the Back of the Bike
7
A Writer Writes: The Last Ride by Elise Annunziata (Senegal 1996-99)
8
Remembering Moritz Thomsen (Ecuador 1965-67)
9
Mark Jacobs (Paraguay 1978-80) Meursault's Father in Superstition Review
10
Review — POSTED IN PARAGUAY by Eloise Hanner (Afghanistan 1971–73, Paraguay 1999–2000)

Jason Carter Wins in Georgia

RPCV  Jason  (South Africa 1998-2000) author of Power Lines, his Peace Corps memoir published by the National Geographic Society in 2002, has won the Democrat nomination for governor of Georgia. Jason is the great-grandson of RPCV writer Lillian Carter (India 1967-69) who wrote Away From Home: Letters to My Family, published by Simon & Schuster, 1977.  Jason is a state senator Georgia and the grandson of former President Jimmy Carter. Carter, 38, was first elected to the Georgia Senate in May 2010 and has been at the forefront among Democrats on issues like education and redistricting. While Democrats once dominated state politics, the Republicans have been the party in power since 2002 when Sonny Perdue became the first Republican governor of Georgia since Reconstruction. The state has voted for every Republican presidential nominee since 2000, although President Barack Obama garnered 47 percent of voters in 2008. Last year, Obama received . . .

Read More

Review: Lost Girl Found by Leah Bassoff and Laura DeLuca (Kenya 1987-89)

Lost Girl Found by Leah Bassoff and Laura DeLuca (Kenya 1987-89) Groundwood Books $16.95 (hard cover); $9.99 (Kindle) 192 pages 2014 Reviewed by Alana DeJoseph (Mali 1992–94) The book Lost Girl Found begins with a scene of two southern Sudanese girls, Poni and her friend Nadai, eating mangos. It is the time before the second Sudanese Civil War has reached the town of Chukudum in what is now the country of South Sudan. For all of us Peace Corps volunteers who served in a country that had mango trees, I don’t need to explain the visceral memories the words mango season conjure up. For those who have not had the experience, let it suffice to say that mango season is as close to Candy Land as one can get. And with this first scene in the book Leah Bassoff and Laura DeLuca had me instantly hooked. Although Lost Girl Found . . .

Read More

The Peace Corps Now Accepting Applications for Global Health Service Partnership Volunteers for 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 19, 2014 The Peace Corps Now Accepting Applications for Global Health Service Partnership Volunteers for 2015 Volunteers train a new generation of physicians and nurses in Africa WASHINGTON, D.C., May 19, 2014 – Today the Global Health Service Partnership program begins accepting applications from physicians and nurses interested in serving as healthcare educators in Malawi, Tanzania and Uganda starting summer 2015. Volunteers serve one-year assignments at medical and nursing schools working alongside local faculty to strengthen the quality of their education and clinical practices. The Global Health Service Partnership is a collaboration of the Peace Corps, the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), and the non-profit Seed Global Health. The program presents an opportunity for American physicians and nurses to make a tangible difference in communities abroad by addressing the known shortage of skilled physicians, nurses and clinical faculty in resource-limited countries. The first-ever group of . . .

Read More

Renewable Resources–The Second Generation

[This “A Writer Writes” was published back in the Nineties and is a amusing and touching tale by a ‘second generation’ PCV, Adrienne Benson Scherger (Nepal 1992-94).] A Writer Writes Renewable Resources Growing Up with “Sarge” Shriver’s Biggest Fans by Adrienne Benson Scherger (Nepal 1992-94) MY BROTHER IS THE BLACK SHEEP of the family. He married a year out of college and went to law school, which he loved. Soon afterwards he became a lawyer and a father. I admire his rebellious spirit. I, on the other hand, split up with my college boyfriend just before graduation. He went back home to Alaska, and I packed a backpack and headed for the Himalayas to work as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Nepal. I always was the dutiful daughter. Ever since I can remember, Sargent Shriver’s name has been a household word. Often, one or the other of my parent’s would . . .

Read More

“Development Is Down This Road” by Abigail Calkins Aguirre (Cameroon)

[Winner of the 1992 Peace Corps Experience Award was this excellent essay by Abigail Calkins Aguirre (Cameroon 1987-90) entitled, “Development Is Down This Road.” Peace Corps writing and remembering doesn’t get much better than this.] • A Writer Writes: Development Is Down This Road by Abigail Calkins Aguirre (Cameroon 1987-90) FEW RECOGNIZE ME without my trademark Suzuki. Now I have this red Yamaha DT they gave me to replace it. I’m still white, though, or so they keep insisting as I pass by the shouting voices trying to get me to stop to do a favor, chat, or taste the latest in palm wine. I know I have a bike, but how do you say “I’m not a taxi” in the local language? I’m late, I’m in a hurry, I’ve got to help a women’s group plant rows of plantains and pineapple in their community farm. This road could jostle my . . .

Read More

A Writer Writes: The Boy on the Back of the Bike

[In the May 2005 issue of Peace Corps Writers, we published this “A Writer Writes” essay “The Boy on the Back of the Bike” written by Terry Campbell (Tanzania 1985-87; Dominican Republic 1989-92; Crisis Corps El Salvador 2001-02). We haven’t heard from Terry in some time, not sure he is following our site or the workings of the Peace Corps, but this piece he wrote shows where his heart is.] The Boy on the Back of the Bike By Terry Campbell IN NOVEMBER November 2004, I returned to Tanzania where I had served in the Peace Corps from 1985 to 1987. I had been wanting to go back for a long time, but as everyone knows, it’s expensive. Then I saw this deal on the internet and I grabbed it. After hitting the final “purchase ticket” button, I panicked a little. It had been seventeen years since I’d left Tanzania! . . .

Read More

A Writer Writes: The Last Ride by Elise Annunziata (Senegal 1996-99)

[This piece by Elise Annunziata (Senegal 1996-99) was published a decade ago, and it is one of our most remembered pieces. So, we are republishing it for those RPCVs who missed reading it the first time.] A Writer Writes The Last Ride by Elise Annunziata (Senegal 1996-99) I HAD SAID SO OFTEN that leaving my Senegalese village, Keur Madiabel, would the most difficult part of my three-year Peace Corps service. Every time a farewell scene crept into my mind, I banished it quickly and vowed to think about it later. But, before I accepted the reality of my departure, “later” was looming over my head and it was time to drive – for the last time – from my village to the regional capital, with a fraction of my original possessions thrown into the backseat of a Peace Corps vehicle. My last full day Most of the afternoon on my . . .

Read More

Remembering Moritz Thomsen (Ecuador 1965-67)

Moritz Thomsen (Ecuador 1965-67) is considered by many to be our ‘great’ Peace Corps writer. He is considered by others to be our most overlooked great American writer. Moritz was the author of a Peace Corps memoir Living Poor, the first of his three published books. He died of cholera in Guayaquil, Ecuador on August 28, 1991. Back in the days of our ‘old’ website: www.peacecorpswriters.org, we published a long essay on Moritz written by Marcus Covert who had reached out to me for any background information I might have on Moritz. Marc had learned about Moritz Thomsen through a piece by Pat Joseph in Salon.com, published in July 1998, titled “The Saddest Gringo.” He borrowed a copy of Living Poor and was hooked immediately. It didn’t take him long to burn through Farm on the River of Emeralds, The Saddest Pleasure, and My Two Wars, then he was, as . . .

Read More

Mark Jacobs (Paraguay 1978-80) Meursault's Father in Superstition Review

Superstition Review is the online literary magazine produced by creative writing and web design students at Arizona State University. Founded by Patricia Colleen Murphy in 2008, the mission of the journal is to promote contemporary art and literature by providing a free, easy-to-navigate, high quality online publication that features work by established and emerging artists and authors from all over the world. They publish two issues a year with art, fiction, interviews, nonfiction and poetry. In their latest issue is this story by Mark Jacob’s (Paraguay 1978-80) Meursault’s Father. Mark Jacobs has published 96 stories in magazines including The Atlantic, The Iowa Review, The Southern Humanities Review, The Idaho Review, and The Kenyon Review. He has stories forthcoming in several magazines including Playboy. His fifth book, a novel set in Turkey entitled Forty Wolves, came out in 2010. A former U.S. Foreign Service officer, he currently works for the State . . .

Read More

Review — POSTED IN PARAGUAY by Eloise Hanner (Afghanistan 1971–73, Paraguay 1999–2000)

Posted in Paraguay: Adventures Below the 20th Parallel by Eloise Hanner (Afghanistan 1971–73, Paraguay 1999–2000) A Peace Corps Writers Book $14.95 (paperback); $4.99 (Kindle) 262 pages 2014 Review by Leita Kaldi Davis (Senegal 1993-96) “Nobody goes to Paraguay,” asserts Hanner in her opening sentence of Posted in Paraguay: Adventures Below the 20th Parallel. But, of course, Peace Corps does. And so did Eloise and Chuck Hanner, They are among the rare people who become bored with making money and playing golf, and seek broader horizons outside their comfort zones. They are the kind of people who become Peace Corps Volunteers. Eloise and Chuck had already served in Afghanistan from 1971-73, shortly after their marriage, and Eloise published that story in Letters from Afghanistan. They then spend decades building their own little empire as stock brokers in San Diego, before they felt the need to move on. They did a long . . .

Read More

Copyright © 2019. Peace Corps Worldwide.