Author - John Coyne

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C. Payne Lucas and Kevin Lowther’s Book on the Peace Corps (Sierra Leone)
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Peace Corps Office of Inspector General announces criminal case against former trainee
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An RCPV Sexual Harassment Story in America and the Peace Corps (Uzbekistan)
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Ethiopia’s First Peace Corps Staff, Part Six
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From the Washington Post: C Payne Lucas, leader of relief efforts across Africa, dies at 85
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C. Payne Lucas dies at 85
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Ethiopia’s First Peace Corps Staff, Part Five
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Ethiopia’s First Peace Corps Staff, Part Four
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Former President Obama Mentions the Peace Corps in University of Illinois speech today. A First!
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Ethiopia’s First Peace Corps Staff, Part Three

C. Payne Lucas and Kevin Lowther’s Book on the Peace Corps (Sierra Leone)

  Thanks for the ‘heads up’ from Joanne Roll (Colombia 1963-65) In 1978, C. Payne Lucas and Kevin Lowther  published Keeping Kennedy’s Promise: The Peace Corps, Unmet Hope of the New Frontier. It was critical of some aspects of Peace Corps. Kevin wrote a follow-up summary of the book in 2002, and repeated the criticisms.  Here are Kevin Lowther’s comments on the book. • Keeping Kennedy’s Promise: The Peace Corps’ Moment of Truth Kevin Lowther (Sierra Leone –65)   The Peace Corps — and the society from which it springs — has not always faced hard truths. This was so when we first published Keeping Kennedy’s Promise in 1978. It is no less true today, in a world — and a country —which needs the Peace Corps even more than it did at its founding in 1961. Many of those who helped to create and build the Peace Corps in the 1960s regarded . . .

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Peace Corps Office of Inspector General announces criminal case against former trainee

The Peace Corps Office of Inspector General announced that yesterday, September 19, 2018, a former Peace Corps trainee was charged with three counts of video voyeurism stemming from conduct he engaged in while a trainee in Zambia. Matthew Walker, 30, was charged by an information in the Northern District of Florida at the U.S. District Court in Panama City, Florida. As alleged in the information, Walker was a Peace Corps trainee in Zambia in 2016. On three occasions Walker is alleged to have used his GoPro camera to record a fellow trainee, without consent, while the fellow trainee was naked and changing in areas where the fellow trainee had a reasonable expectation of privacy.  The name of the victim is being withheld from the public to protect the victim’s privacy. Inspector General Kathy A. Buller said of the matter, “Our Volunteers are some of the best and brightest that America . . .

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An RCPV Sexual Harassment Story in America and the Peace Corps (Uzbekistan)

Thanks for the ‘heads up’ from  Beatrice Hogan (Uzbekistan 1992-94) Jessica Shortall is married with two children and is a strategy consultant, social entrepreneur, and the author of Work, Pump, Repeat: The New Mom’s Survival Guide to Breastfeeding and Going Back to Work. In October 2015, she delivered a TED talk, “The American Case for Paid Maternity Leave” at TEDxSMU. She was a PCV in (Uzbekistan 2000-02) Everything I can remember by Jessica Shortall published on MEDIUM Sep 20, 2018 When I was about 8, my mother took my sister and me to a local state park, a place where we would often ramble among the rocks and trees and streams. I waded up a stream on this particular trip, and when I looked back for my mom, I had gone a bit too far. A man was standing there in the stream, blocking my way, looking at me. He . . .

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Ethiopia’s First Peace Corps Staff, Part Six

Bill Kruse, who flew into Addis Ababa on August 5, 1962, was born in Chicago and raised in Des Plaines, Illinois. He was a student at the University of Illinois in 1944 when he became a flight engineer with the Army Air Corps and was shipped off to Puerto Rico and the Caribbean Defense Command, where he became the founder and editor of the Caribbean Defense Command News Digest. After his army discharge, he returned to the University of Illinois and before earning his B.A. in English in 1949, he knocked off one semester to hitch-hike with a friend through the South and back to Chicago working as common laborers on the way. For a few years after his graduation he moved from job to job—to the steel mills of South Chicago, to Marshall Field’s furniture department, to the stockyards, a trucking firm. In June, 1953, he became a copywriter . . .

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From the Washington Post: C Payne Lucas, leader of relief efforts across Africa, dies at 85

C Payne Lucas, leader of relief efforts across Africa, dies at 85 Payne Lucas, who died Sept. 15 at 85, led Africare for more than three decades. (Dudley M. Brooks/The Washington Post) By Emily Langer Payne Lucas, who was credited with improving lives across Africa as a founder and longtime president of Africare, a Washington-based relief organization that has constructed roads and wells, established schools and literacy programs, and improved health care in some of the neediest countries in the world, died Sept. 15 at a hospital in Silver Spring, Md. He was 85. The cause was advanced dementia, said his wife, Freddie Hill Lucas. Mr. Lucas, one of 14 children born to a lumber mill worker and his wife, was once described by The Washington Post as an “accidental idealist.” He grew up in poverty, achieved an education through scholarships and rose through the ranks of the fledgling Peace Corps before . . .

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C. Payne Lucas dies at 85

  C. Payne Lucas, early Peace Corps Director in Togo (1963)  and co-founder of Africare, passed away peacefully on Saturday, September 15th. His stewardship of Africare for many years build the organization to unparalleled status in the African development community. It all began for C. Payne in the Peace Corps as CD for Togo. In November 1963 Payne arrived in Togo on temporary orders from PC/HQ. He had been there for a few days, living in the Benin Hotel, when the Acting Director, Robert Haves, decided to return to L.A. and rescue his law practice. This left Lucas in command of a complicated program. He quickly showed that he could handle it. Payne had come to the Peace Corps after being a research intern with the Democratic National Committee. He saw the Peace Corps, he said at the time, “as an instrument of foreign aid in areas where AID had . . .

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Ethiopia’s First Peace Corps Staff, Part Five

Ed Corboy, from Hyde Park, Mass, packed a rifle in the infantry from 1943 to 1946. With the war’s end, he returned to Massachusetts and completed a business course at Bryant and Straton school in Boston. The Foreign Service School at Georgetown attracted him to Washington, and he studied there at night for the next five years while working days as a secretary to the Joint Chiefs of Staff. In 1956, shortly before he received the degree of Bachelor of Science in Foreign Service, he was invited to work as a law clerk for the Washington law firm of Covington and Burling. This firm, involved in the Dupont-General Motors anti-trust action, came to Georgetown to hire 30 people, of whom two were asked to stay on when the anti-trust suit was concluded. One of the two was Corboy, “and a lucky thing, too,” he now says. For it was at . . .

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Ethiopia’s First Peace Corps Staff, Part Four

After establishing the Peace Corps Headquarters on a eucalyptus-covered hillside above Addis Ababa, Wofford concluded that in a nation twice the size of Texas, the program should be administered on a regional basis. With Canby assigned to the former Italian colony of Eritrea, two other Associate Representatives (APCDs) were posted to the rest of Ethiopia although both were assigned houses in Addis Ababa. William White was given primary responsibility for Volunteers in the north and west country which included the capitals of Gondar and Axum and the vast canyon of the Blue Nile. William Kruse was assigned to the south and east, the land of the Rift Valley, the Ogaden desert and the cities of Harar and Diredawa. Although he was born and raised in Cleveland, Bill White enrolled in Atlanta’s Morehouse College for one semester, this at the insistence of an aunt in Alabama “who wanted me to experience . . .

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Former President Obama Mentions the Peace Corps in University of Illinois speech today. A First!

And from the wreckage of world War II, we built a post-war architecture, system of alliances and institutions to underwrite freedom and oppose Soviet totalitarianism and to help poorer countries develop. American leadership across the globe wasn’t perfect. We made mistakes. At times we lost sight of our ideals. We had fierce arguments about Vietnam and we had fierce arguments about Iraq. But thanks to our leadership, a bipartisan leadership, and the efforts of diplomats and peace corps volunteers, and most of all thanks to the constant sacrifices of our men and women in uniform, we not only reduced the prospects of war between the world’s great powers, we not only won the Cold War, we helped spread a commitment to certain values and principles like the rule of law and human rights and democracy and the notion of the inherent dignity and worth of every individual.

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Ethiopia’s First Peace Corps Staff, Part Three

Harris Wofford was born in Johnson City, Tenn., and raised in Scarsdale, N.Y. While still in high school, he founded and became the first president of the Student Federalist Movement, after he was inspired by Clarence Streit’s Union Now. Enrolled in the University of Chicago’s accelerated student’s plan, he took Chicago’s famed great books curriculum and received his degree in two yers, after which he became the first holder of an accelerated degree to be admitted to Yale University Law School. He also became the first White student to be admitted to Howard University Law School since suffragette days when some White women sought to dramatize their demands for the vote by enrolling there. In 1954, he received law degrees from both Yale and Howard. In 1948, the year in which he graduated from Chicago, Wofford attended a World Youth Festival in Prague which he also covered in three articles . . .

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