Archive - 2021

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Another Point of View of the Peace Corps in Afghanistan
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Peace Corps/Afghanistan Books
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RPCV Jeremy Black and staff member Dr. Robert Textor: A Peace Corps Story
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Review — ELISABETH SAMSON FORBIDDEN BRIDE by C.V. Hamilton (Suriname)
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“Round ’em Up and Move ’em Out!” by Jerry Redfield (Ecuador)
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Peace Corps Worldwide Awards: 2020 Paul Cowan Award for Best Non-Fiction to Peter Reid (Tanzania)
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“Hitching a Ride to Tikal” by Alan Jackson (Belize)
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Uruguay RPCVs hold Peace Pole dedication during County Fair in Minnesota
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Book Award — Best Peace Corps Memoir of 2020
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Chris Roesel (Guatemala) has published HOW TO IMPROVE THE WORLD QUICKLY

Another Point of View of the Peace Corps in Afghanistan

by M. Jamil Hanifi The information and discussion about the activities of and the accumulation of various forms of capital by some Peace Corps Volunteers (PCVs)—all in South America—is interesting (Anthropology News, December 2011, March 2012). President John Kennedy adapted the blast “ask not what this country can do for you, ask what you can do for this country” from his prep school headmaster’s command “ask not what this school can do for you, ask what you can do for this school”. The predecessor of the American Peace Corps (PC) project was the “Community Development” (CD) model housed in several American universities funded by the government and designed to coordinate various “development” projects in foreign countries and to cloak the real intentions of the American “foreign aid” program which was intervention in and control of the civil and political societies of the “Underdeveloped World”. During the 1950s the University of Wyoming was . . .

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Peace Corps/Afghanistan Books

  Lessons from Afghanistan David  Fleishhacker (Afghanistan 1962-64) DF Publications, 2002   Little Women of Baghlan The Story of a Nursing School for Girls in Afghanistan, the Peace Corps, and Life Before the Taliban Susan Fox (Afghanistan 1968-70) Peace Corps Writers, 2013   Lessons of Love in Afghanistan: A Lifelong Commitment to the Afghan People Susanne Griffin (Afghanistan Staff Spouse 1968-70), Peter Bussian (Photographer) Bennett & Hastings, 2014   Letters from Afghanistan Eloise Hanner (Afghanistan 1971-73) Branden Publishing Co., 2003   The Early Years of Peace Corps in Afghanistan: A Promising Time Frances Hopkins Irwin & Will A. Irwin (Afghanistan 1966-67) Peace Corps Writers, 2014   My Time in Afghanistan Henry Intili (Afghanistan 1968-three months ETed)   A Land Without Time: A Peace Corps Volunteer in Afghanistan John Sumser (Afghanistan 1977-78) Academy Chicago Publishers, 2006   Afghanistan at a Time of Peace Robin  Varnum (Afghanistan 1971–73); photographer: Juris Zagarins (Afghanistan, 1971-1974) Peace Corps . . .

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RPCV Jeremy Black and staff member Dr. Robert Textor: A Peace Corps Story

(Thank you to John Coyne and Marian Haley Beil for their advice and editing) Decades separated the Peace Corps service of Dr. Robert Textor (PC staff 1961-62) and RPCV Jerry Black (Comoros Island 1992-94, DC staff: OIG 2010-21). But they shared a special commitment to Peace Corps Sadly, neither are still with us. But their contribution to Peace Corps endures. Dr. Textor, age 89, died January 3, 2013. Tragically, Jeremiah Black was killed, caught in urban gun violence crossfire, in Washington, DC. June 29, 2021.   Their story begins In February of 2011, the Peace Corps Office of the Inspector General announced it would evaluate “Impacts of the Five-Year Rule on Operations of the Peace Corps.” The Five Year Rule is unique among Federal Agencies because it limits employment with Peace Corps to Five Years, with some critical exceptions. This evaluation was conducted under the direction of Jim O’Keefe, Assistant . . .

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Review — ELISABETH SAMSON FORBIDDEN BRIDE by C.V. Hamilton (Suriname)

  Elisabeth Samson, Forbidden Bride C.V. Hamilton (Suriname 1999-01) ‎Swift House Press June 2020 401 pages $17.95 (paperback), $3.99 (Kindle) Reviewed by Stephen Foehr (Ethiopia 1965-67) • Elisabeth Samson was a real person, a Free Negress. But members of her family remained in slavery, while others were bought out of enslavement, which is how Samson was born free in the 18th century Dutch colony of Suriname. The situation was ripe for drama and moral dilemma, especially with the addition of a Black/White love affair. And there is this twist: Elisabeth Samson was a rich plantation owner with hundreds of slaves, importer of luxury European goods, a Dutch colonial wannabe, whose greatest anguish was not being allowed to marry the love of her life, a white man, and that they had not conceived a child. C.V. Hamilton’s novel Elisabeth Samson, Forbidden Bride is based on Samson’s journals discovered by the author and . . .

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“Round ’em Up and Move ’em Out!” by Jerry Redfield (Ecuador)

  This is a “slice of life” from a Peace Corps Volunteer that captures the adventures and frustrations of one newly arrived volunteer living in a new culture in southern Ecuador.  It is from a “work in progress” entitled “While You Were Out”, by Jerry Redfield. Peace Corps Volunteers, Jerry, Joe Orr of Utah, and Doug Strauss from New York had arrived in a remote mountain top little village about two months earlier as their initial in-country assignment working on a school construction program. This covers the time between the end of that assignment and the transition to a new one. John Smith was the Peace Corps Area Representative, and Steve Caplin, the Peace Corps doctor assigned to the Area.   Round ’em Up and Move ’em Out! by Jerry Redfield (Ecuador 1963-65) As November ended and the cold winds of December started to roll in, the time in our . . .

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Peace Corps Worldwide Awards: 2020 Paul Cowan Award for Best Non-Fiction to Peter Reid (Tanzania)

THE PAUL COWAN NON-FICTION AWARD, first given 1990, was named to honor Paul Cowan, a Peace Corps Volunteer who served in Ecuador from 1966 to 1967. Cowan wrote about his time as a Volunteer in Latin America in the ’60s. A longtime activist and political writer for The Village Voice, Cowan died of leukemia in 1988. • Every Hill a Burial Place The Peace Corps Murder Trial in East Africa   by Peter H. Reid (Tanzania 1964-66) On March 28, 1966, Peace Corps personnel in Tanzania received word that volunteer Peppy Kinsey had fallen to her death while rock climbing during a picnic. Local authorities arrested Kinsey’s husband, Bill, and charged him with murder as witnesses came forward claiming to have seen the pair engaged in a struggle. The incident had the potential to be disastrous for both the Peace Corps and the newly independent nation of Tanzania. To this day, the high stakes . . .

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“Hitching a Ride to Tikal” by Alan Jackson (Belize)

Alan and Keith were Peace Corps Volunteers in Belize, Central America, from 1976 to 1978. Alan was stationed in Belize City where he was assigned to the Fisheries Unit Laboratory, and boarded with a young Belizean family. Keith was posted to the Mopan Mayan village of San Antonio in Toledo District and advised a beekeeper and honey cooperative. Keith lived in a thatch hut without electricity or running water. • Hitching a Ride to Tikal By Alan Jackson   Both Keith and I had to work the annual Agricultural and Trade Show on Saturday and Sunday, April 22 and 23, 1978, in Belmopan, Belize. The Ag Show is like a small county fair with dozens of thatched booths displaying the various goods and products of government and private industry. The British military usually had some of their weapons on display, too. The two-day fair also included food stalls, horse racing, . . .

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Uruguay RPCVs hold Peace Pole dedication during County Fair in Minnesota

  About 20 former Peace Corps members from around the country gathered outside the historic Sunnyside School at the Beltrami County Fairgrounds on Friday, Aug. 13, to hold a Peace Pole dedication ceremony.   All of the former members at the event served in Uruguay from the years 1965 to 1967, and still get together from time to time. “We’re from all different states in the country,” said Toni Kilkenny-Williams, a former member who now lives in California. “Oklahoma, Wisconsin, Washington, Connecticut. . .” As former Peace Corps member John Eggers lowered the hollow, white Peace Pole over a wooden post, he described the message of the monument. The pole reads “May Peace Prevail on Earth” in English, Ojibwe, Norwegian and Spanish, with each translation displayed vertically on the square pole’s four sides. Former Peace Corps member John Eggers describes the languages displayed on the Peace Pole during a ceremony . . .

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Book Award — Best Peace Corps Memoir of 2020

  In Search of Pink Flamingos: A Woman’s Quest for Forgiveness and Unconditional Love     By Susan E. Greisen (Liberia 1971-73; Tonga 1973-74)   A young woman defies her parents’ demands to become a farmer’s wife. At age nineteen, with a suitcase full of farm-smarts and a license to be a practical nurse, Susan joins the Peace Corps in Africa. She meets multiple challenges in her remote Liberian village and falls short of her unrealistic goals. An interracial romance further aggravates her parents who eventually disown her. When Susan finds the pink flamingos, she discovers what she had been searching for all along. Her journey is one of passion, strength and finding forgiveness and unconditional love.   Susan writes… The last time I received a first-place blue ribbon I was twelve years old at my grade school track competition. I was one of seven in the 100-yard dash. But . . .

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Chris Roesel (Guatemala) has published HOW TO IMPROVE THE WORLD QUICKLY

  Based on having worked in numerous developing countries, initially as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Guatemala, then in Asia, Africa and the Americas, and my studies at Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, the following is the program I have developed, and discuss fully in How to Improve the World Quickly to improve the health, nutrition and water quality of any community in the world. • Require upfront community buy-in for collaboration; • Meet and consult the local authorities;  • Convene a community meeting and plan with the community, using the Future Search Conference Methodology (futuresearch.net/methodology), condensed into two days; • Initiate baseline survey of water, diarrhea, malaria, and income;  • Invite bids for state of the art work from local contractors; • Sign and supervise contracts; • Install at least one well and rainwater collection facility;  • Refurbish or build latrines.  • Ensure malaria prevention (LLITNs—long lasting insecticide treated . . .

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