Archive - January 29, 2013

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Be # 1000 on our Petition for Ambassador Chris Stevens, Sign UP!
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J. Grigsby Crawford (Ecuador 2009-11) Publishes His Peace Corps Memoir

Be # 1000 on our Petition for Ambassador Chris Stevens, Sign UP!

Carol Gelhaus of Five Point, South Caroline  is # 999 You can be #1000! [Tino Calabia (Peru 1963-65) who rallied all of us RPCVs in support of Ambassador Christopher Stevens sent me a note about our collective efforts to reach 1000 signatures. Marian Haley Beil (Ethiopia 1962-64) established a petition at SignOn.org that we hope you will sign. This is what Tino had to say, writing today from Tokyo where he is visiting his son, the FSO at our Embassy in Japan.] Several Senators and House Representatives have finally brought Hillary Clinton before them to regurgitate their pre-election criticism of the Administration’s initial description of the Benghazi killings that left four Americans dead. The winds of punditry swirl with conjectures regarding the reasons Clinton’s harshest critics are attempting to besmirch her coming departure as Secretary of State.  Some commentators suggest that a few of her critics were launching preemptive strikes aimed at weakening . . .

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J. Grigsby Crawford (Ecuador 2009-11) Publishes His Peace Corps Memoir

J. Grigsby Crawford (Ecuador 2009-11) is the author of The Gringo: A Memoir, which tells the story of his two years as a PCV. He served in Peace Corps Ecuador’s Natural Resource Conservation program, and ultimately wrote a successful grant to help build a greenhouse at the local high school in his Amazonian community. But Grigsby writes: The Gringo tells a different Peace Corps tale than one is used to hearing. In Ecuador, Crawford was originally sent to the coast, where after just a few months he narrowly escaped an abduction attempt and was pulled out by security and forced to change sites. From there–as the synopsis of The Gringo states–he undertakes “a savage journey of danger, drugs, sex, and alarming illness.” It is a PCV story that is both tragic and sharply humorous.  The Gringo was published in December 2012 and, he says, “immediately met national attention,” getting excerpted in the Huffington Post and . . .

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