Archive - July 2013

1
First Class of Peace Corps Global Health Service Partnership Volunteers Sworn In at the White House
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Congressman John Garamendi (Ethiopia 1966-68) Speaking Up For The Peace Corps
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Obama Selects Nominee For Top Peace Corps Job
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Shriver Stories: The Ambassador Will Vouch For Me
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Hessler (China 1996-98) and Packer (Togo 1982-84) In Current New Yorker
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Shriver Stories: Sarge in Debre Markos
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Is the Peace Corps Now on the Scrapheap of History?
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RPCVs Third Goal Projects: Letting Others Know
9
The storySouth Million Writers Award is Now Open
10
Review of Greg Alder’s (Lesotho 2003-06) THE MOUNTAIN SCHOOL

First Class of Peace Corps Global Health Service Partnership Volunteers Sworn In at the White House

Volunteers prepare to leave for one-year assignments working as medical or nursing educators in Tanzania, Malawi and Uganda WASHINGTON, D.C. July 18, 2013 – Thirty U.S. doctors and nurses from across the country were sworn in at the White House today as the first class of Peace Corps Global Health Service Partnership volunteers. The new volunteers will leave this weekend for one-year assignments as medical or nursing educators in Tanzania, Malawi and Uganda, where they will work alongside local faculty to train the next generation of healthcare professionals. “These volunteers will soon depart for a ground-breaking adventure – an opportunity to make a real difference in communities abroad while enhancing their own skills,” Peace Corps Deputy Director Carrie Hessler-Radelet said. “The Global Health Service Partnership is an exciting continuation of the Peace Corps’ commitment to global health.” The Global Health Service Partnership – a collaboration of the Peace Corps, the . . .

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Obama Selects Nominee For Top Peace Corps Job

WASHINGTON – President Barack Obama has nominated the deputy director of the Peace Corps to be the agency’s director. The White House on Thursday announced the nomination of Carolyn Hessler Radelet to the top Peace Corps post. She was a Peace Corps volunteer in Western Samoa in the early 1980s and held various positions with a public health management firm, John Snow Inc., before becoming the agency’s deputy director in 2010.

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Shriver Stories: The Ambassador Will Vouch For Me

Charlene Duline (Peru 1962-64) had just moved to Paris in 1969 and Christmas was approaching when she read in the newspapers about a Christmas Eve Mass that the new Ambassador was having in the ancient Sainte Chappelle Church. Well, why don’t I let Charlene tell her story of meeting up with Sarge once again, this time in Paris. The Ambassador Will Vouch For Me It was 1969 and Christmas was approaching. I was settling into life in Paris, France after moving there two months previously. I saw an article in the newspaper about a Christmas Eve Mass Sargent Shriver, U.S. Ambassador to France, was having in the tiny, ancient Sainte Chappelle church and inviting diplomats, friends and family. It was going to be an intimate and elegant affair, and I decided that I would like to attend. A friend who was a volunteer in Morocco was coming to spend Christmas . . .

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Hessler (China 1996-98) and Packer (Togo 1982-84) In Current New Yorker

Staff writer for The New Yorker George Packer (Togo 1982-84) who in May published The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America, which was reviewed recently on the site, has a comment on page 21 of the July 22, 2013, issue. Packer writes about the double standards of American foreign aid in the Middle East, given what is happening in Egypt. Meanwhile 0n the streets of Cairo is our own Peter Hessler (China 1996-98). Peter, who is also a staff writer for The New Yorker, also has a new book out this spring:  Strange Stones: Dispatches from East and West. Peter’s Letter From Cairo in on page 26 of the current issue and is entitled, “The Showdown: winners and losers in Egypt’s ongoing revolution.” Peter and his family live now in Cairo, only blocks from Tahrir Square, and his view of the military ‘coup’ is an eye-witness account from . . .

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Shriver Stories: Sarge in Debre Markos

Jon Ebeling (Ethiopia 1962-64) spent five years with the Peace Corps as a PCV and APCD in Ethiopia. Upon returning he entered the Ph.D. program at the University of Pittsburgh’s Graduate School of Public and International where he earned his Ph.D. in Economic and Social Development. As he graduated from the University, he came down with a severe case of juvenile diabetes and could not return to Africa. He taught statistics and public finance in the Department of Political Science at CSU, Chico for 32 years while directing over 200 master’s degree thesis until his retirement. He has done extensive consulting with governments and private industry in the area. He specializes in revenue forecasting, evaluation research, and public opinion research. He has taught off and on in the Economics Department as needed since the early 1970’s. Jon and his wife, Frederica Shockley, Chair of the Economics Department now have a . . .

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Is the Peace Corps Now on the Scrapheap of History?

Watching the event this afternoon, Monday, July 15, 2013, where the President and  former president George Bush, honored an Iowa couple as part of Point of Light Awards, I was struck again how the Peace Corps has been cast aside by the current cast of characters in Washington. Obama wouldn’t even meet with RPCVs during the 50th celebration, and here we have been ‘volunteering’ for 50 years, way before 1989 when George H.W. Bush talked about “points of light” in his inaugural address. Bush said he wanted citizens who make a difference through their volunteer work. Hello! What about us? RPCVs, some 220,000, have been volunteering since 1961, and continue to ‘do good’  in the world, as well as at home, fulfilling the Third Goal of the Peace Corps Act. One reason Marian and I wanted to focus part of  www.peacecorpsworldwide.org website on Third Goal Projects is because RPCV projects . . .

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RPCVs Third Goal Projects: Letting Others Know

Third Goal Projects Marian Haley Beil (Ethiopia 1962-64) and John Coyne (Ethiopia 1962-64) in the late 1970s published a newsletter RPCV Writers & Readers that developed by early 2000s into the website:www.peacecorpsworldwide.org. Today, this is an online community and resource for RPCVs, Peace Corps Volunteers, their friends and families, and all who share a desire for international understanding. Peace Corps Worldwide is not officially connected with the Peace Corps or the National Peace Corps Association. As the publisher and editor of this site, we are continually impressed by the Third Goal activities of RPCVs back in their host countries, the projects that RPCVs have developed in-country over the last fifty-plus years, from school and community libraries to health initiatives, to peace keeping efforts, to scholarships for students, and many other such efforts on behalf of their former hosts and the lifelong friends that they have made. We would like to . . .

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The storySouth Million Writers Award is Now Open

Jason Sanford is the author of a number of short stories, essays, and articles, and an active member of the SFWA. While he was born and raised in the American South, he currently live in the Midwestern U.S. with his wife and sons. His life’s adventures have included working as an archeologist and a Peace Corps Volunteer in Thailand in the 1990s. He has published a dozen of his short stories in the British SF magazine Interzone, which devoted a special issue to his fiction in December 2010. His fiction has also been published in Year’s Best SF 14 , Asimov’s Science Fiction, Analog: Science Fiction and Fact, Orson Scott Card’s Intergalactic Medicine Show, Tales of the Unanticipated, The Mississippi Review, Diagram, Pindeldyboz, and other places. Among the awards and honors he has received include being a finalist for the 2009 Nebula Award for Best Novella, winning both the 2008 . . .

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Review of Greg Alder’s (Lesotho 2003-06) THE MOUNTAIN SCHOOL

The Mountain School by Greg Alder (Lesotho 2003-06) CreateSpace, $13.00 250 pages 2013 $13.00 (paperback), $5.00 (Kindle) Reviewed by Deidre Swesnik (Mali 1996-98) • If you’ve been to Peace Corps, especially if you have been to Peace Corps in Africa, you know the feeling – the feeling of being dropped off at your site by a white Peace Corps truck.  Peace Corps drops you off with your stuff and they drive away.  And there you are.  Alone. And even if you weren’t in Africa, you will have that feeling at some point on your first day at your new site.  Even if you are surrounded by people almost all the time – like I was for most of my service in Mali – you can’t avoid those moments of feeling totally apart.  It’s a universal feeling. Greg Alder has mastered portraying those (what I believe to be) universals of the . . .

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