Archive - September 12, 2018

1
Review — REMIND ME AGAIN WHAT HAPPENED by Joanna Luloff (Sri Lanka)
2
Ethiopia’s First Peace Corps Staff, Part Five
3
Peace Corps Korean Collection Archived at USC Digitial Library

Review — REMIND ME AGAIN WHAT HAPPENED by Joanna Luloff (Sri Lanka)

  Remind Me Again What Happened by Joanna Luloff (Sri Lanka 1996–98) Algonquin Books June 26, 2018 288 pages $26.9 (paperback), $11.99 (Kindle) Reviewed by Susi Wyss (Central African Republic 1990-92) • Most readers of Joanna Luloff’s latest work, Remind Me Again What Happened, won’t realize that she served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Sri Lanka in the 1990s. There is no mention of this fact in her bio on the book’s jacket, and the novel takes place almost entirely in Vermont and Boston. But if the reader happens to be a fellow RPVC, they are likely to recognize the wanderlust, the irresistible urge to travel to far flung places, that afflicts one of the main characters, Claire. Claire has had plenty of overseas adventures already. As a journalist, she’s been traveling around the world to investigate and write in-depth pieces about climate change and environmental conflicts among the people . . .

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Ethiopia’s First Peace Corps Staff, Part Five

Ed Corboy, from Hyde Park, Mass, packed a rifle in the infantry from 1943 to 1946. With the war’s end, he returned to Massachusetts and completed a business course at Bryant and Straton school in Boston. The Foreign Service School at Georgetown attracted him to Washington, and he studied there at night for the next five years while working days as a secretary to the Joint Chiefs of Staff. In 1956, shortly before he received the degree of Bachelor of Science in Foreign Service, he was invited to work as a law clerk for the Washington law firm of Covington and Burling. This firm, involved in the Dupont-General Motors anti-trust action, came to Georgetown to hire 30 people, of whom two were asked to stay on when the anti-trust suit was concluded. One of the two was Corboy, “and a lucky thing, too,” he now says. For it was at . . .

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Peace Corps Korean Collection Archived at USC Digitial Library

This is a extraordinary effort by the RPCV Friends of Korea and Gary Fedrick (K-6) to collect and preserve the important history of Peace Corps in Korea.  Now, the University of Southern California has accepted the collection for their library.  Please read this announcement: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/p15799coll86 “Between 1966 and 1981, more than two thousand Americans served in Korea as Peace Corps Volunteers, working as teachers, health workers, engineers, agricultural advisers, etc. Living in rural and urban communities across the country, they learned the Korean language and participated in Korean life on a broader and deeper level than any other group of Americans before or since have been able to do. Once returned to their homes after their service, they formed an alumni group called Friends of Korea to continue their friendships with Korea and one another. Many went on to build careers as Korea experts as diplomats, educators, scholars, policy makers, consultants, etc. To . . .

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