Archive - June 2011

1
Review of Michael MacLeod's memoir of Thailand
2
In the Boston Globe! "Toughest job you'll never love
3
Mark K. Shriver Inks Deal at Henry Holt & Company
4
Two Dozen RPCVs Assist Washington-Area Peruvian Consulate
5
Cynthia Morrison Phoel will be reading from Cold Snap: Bulgaria Stories in Bethesda
6
Thor Hanson new book about Feathers!
7
USAID End Runs the Peace Corps
8
Review of One Hand Does Not Catch A Buffalo
9
Review of Joan Richter's The Gambling Master of Shanghai
10
Aaron Williams on Kojo Nnamdi Today at 1:06 pm

Review of Michael MacLeod's memoir of Thailand

Footprints in the Mud: A Peace Corps Volunteer’s 40+ Years of Ties to Thailand by Michael R. MacLeod (Thailand 1964–68) Third Place Press 296 pages $16.95 (to purchase contact: mikermacleod@comcast.net 2011 Reviewed by Lawrence F. Lihosit (Honduras 1975–77) THIS IS AN EXCELLENT BRIDGE between the original Peace Corps and a changing institution. Today, as the Peace Corps reevaluates itself, it is also a guiding handrail while crossing the fast moving river of doubt. The author served in Thailand from 1964 until 1968, entering months after JFK’s death and leaving months after the deaths of MLK and RFK. This was not just a tumultuous time at home with hundreds of cities in flames each summer, it was also a time of war abroad — very near MacLeod’s stilted wooden home in a far-off village. Originally, Peace Corps Volunteers were trained in the U.S. and shipped abroad to serve, much like the . . .

Read More

In the Boston Globe! "Toughest job you'll never love

From the Boston Globe, June 12, 2011: Toughest job you’ll never love by Adam Langer Globe Correspondent (Luci Gutierrez for The Boston Globe) For the past 50 years, the Peace Corps has provided fertile material for a roster of impressive alumni, who include such authors as Kent Haruf, Bob Shacochis, and Paul Theroux. But I wouldn’t expect to see the name Christopher R. Howard, author of “Tea of Ulaanbaatar,” on a Peace Corps recruitment brochure any time soon. Using his brief stint as a volunteer in Mongolia during the late 1990s as his jumping-off point, Howard has produced a debut novel that won’t attract many socially conscious do-gooders to the Corps, but could well appeal to marginally employed slackers seeking to indulge in sex tourism and drug abuse. The Mongolia of [Christopher] Howard’s novel is a memorably bleak, fetid, and sinister place, a likely contender for the world’s least inviting . . .

Read More

Mark K. Shriver Inks Deal at Henry Holt & Company

By Maryann Yin on June 10, 2011 2:52 PM from GalleyCat website Politician Mark K. Shriver has signed a deal with Henry Holt & Company to pen a tome about his father, sargent Robert “Sarge” Shriver. The book will be titled A Good Man: Rediscovering My Father, Sarge Shriver. Publisher Stephen Rubin acquired North American and audio rights in the deal. Executive editor Gillian Blake will edit the book. Here’s more from the press release: “After he eulogized him in January, Mark wanted to know what made his father ‘tick.’ He found the answers in the simple and poignant gestures over a lifetime – in the frequent notes and daily talks, trips and prayers together – all based in Sarge’s unwavering devotion to his family (he and Eunice were married for 56 years); his devout Catholicism, which included attending daily Mass; his innate sense of duty and service to his . . .

Read More

Two Dozen RPCVs Assist Washington-Area Peruvian Consulate

Two Dozen RPCVs Assist Washington-Area Peruvian Consulate With June 5th Run-off Election for Peru’s Presidency Twelve Returned Peace Corps Volunteers who had served in Peru or who served as Volunteers elsewhere but also worked in Peru (albeit with other agencies), answered the call from Deputy Consul General Maria Eugenia Chiozza de Zela of the Peruvian Consulate to report to the Consulate’s Mid-Atlantic Regional polling place on Sunday, June 5th.  They were recruited to help with Peru’s Presidential run-off election.  Another dozen Spanish-speaking RPCVs from Metro Washington supplemented the first 12. The contingent was headed by RPCV Mike Wolfson (Peru, 1964-66) who made and adjusted assignments throughout the day.  Mike also walked the rounds to the six polling locations spread out over the sprawling campuses of a high school and an adjacent middle school, distributing water bottles to volunteers assisting voters while sweltering under the noonday sun.  Most RPCVs were stationed outside explaining to over 13,500 voters where to find their correct building, room, and . . .

Read More

Cynthia Morrison Phoel will be reading from Cold Snap: Bulgaria Stories in Bethesda

Cynthia Morrison Phoel (Bulgaria 1994-96)  will be reading from Cold Snap: Bulgaria Stories at The Writer’s Center in Bethesda, MD, on Sunday, June 26, at 2:00 p.m. Of the book, Dallas Morning News contributor Anne Morris wrote: “It’s not unusual for a returning Peace Corps volunteer to write a book . . . Cynthia Morrison Phoel’s debut collection of six stories set in a Bulgarian village represents that kind of fiction at its best.” For more information, check out www.cynthiaphoel.com, or read the review of her great collection of stories on our site.

Read More

Thor Hanson new book about Feathers!

Thor Hanson (Uganda 1993–95) who wrote the wonderful The Impenetrable Forest a few years ago, his Peace Corps memoir of Uganda, has a new book, Feathers: The Evolution of a Natural Miracle, published by Basic Books this month. In a review in this weekend edition of The Wall Street Journal, Jonathan Rosen, the editorial director of NextbooksInc. writes “Mr. Hanson may be a scientist but he writes like a man who believes in the value of a story.” Rosen goes onto say a lot of wonderful things about Feathers, including, “. . . Mr. Hanson knows it isn’t just the bird at the far end of the binoculars but the human being at the near end that matters, and he is writing as much about the human urge to understand, appreciate and appropriate the wild world as he writing about feathers, which he calls, in his subtitle, a ‘natural miracle.’”

Read More

USAID End Runs the Peace Corps

JUNE 07, 2011 by RICK COHEN When critics suggest that the Obama administration is hard on the corporate sector, they may be missing specific elements of the Obama agenda that have lots of corporate sector promotions built into government programs. Take the volunteerism program of the U.S. Agency for International Development. USAID just established the Center of Excellence for International Corporate Volunteerism, developed in conjunction with IBM and the nonprofit CDC Development Solutions, an organization that manages international corporate volunteerism programs. CDS does well in this deal, getting $743,076 from USAID over two years to get the Center’s website up and operational and IBM will kick in $4.1 million in addition to in-kind donations of technology plus 100 volunteer employees. According to CDS 21 major corporations are on tap to send 2,000 employee volunteers overseas this year compared to only six companies that sent 280 employees to volunteer overseas in . . .

Read More

Review of One Hand Does Not Catch A Buffalo

One Hand Does Not Catch A Buffalo: 50 Years of Amazing Peace Corps Stories: Volume One, Africa Edited by Aaron Barlow (Togo 1988–1990); Series editor Jane Albritton (India 1967–1969) Travelers’ Tales May 2011 452 pages $18.95 Reviewed by Tony D’Souza (Ivory Coast 2000–2002, Madagascar 2002–2003) ONE HAND DOES NOT CATCH A BUFFALO: 50 Years of Amazing Peace Corps Stories: Volume One, Africa is the first of a series of four anthologies celebrating and recording Peace Corps’ accomplishments and contributions to the world through its first half century of life. The idea for this massive compendium came to Jane Albritton in 2007, and must have seemed to anyone willing to listen to her at the time an endeavor nearly as gargantuan, daunting, and Quixotic as the founding of the Peace Corps itself. Four volumes to cover the regions of the world where Volunteers have served — Africa, The Americas, The Heart . . .

Read More

Review of Joan Richter's The Gambling Master of Shanghai

The Gambling Master of Shanghai and other tales of suspense by Joan Richter (Staff spouse — Kenya 1965–67) Peace Corps Writers April 2011 255 pages $15 Reviewed by Tony D’Souza (Ivory Coast 2000–02; Madagascar 2002–03) JOAN RICHTER LIVED FOR TWO YEARS in East Africa, where her husband was deputy director of the Peace Corps/Kenya program, and later she consulted for Peace Corps/Washington on the role of staff wives overseas. But mostly, Joan Richter is a writer. Joan Richter’s The Gambling Master of Shanghai and other tales of suspense, is a finely wrought collection of seventeen stories, a page-turning illumination of an enviable, forty-year writing career. The book is handsome in design and illustration, and boasts a brooding cover of a birdcage in a darkened alleyway that perfectly captures the disturbingly noire tone of these master works. It’s clear that Peace Corps Writers, which chose to publish Ms. Richter’s collection as . . .

Read More

Aaron Williams on Kojo Nnamdi Today at 1:06 pm

Peace Corps Director Aaron Williams will be on the Kojo Nnamdi show on WAMU, the Washington PBS station from noon to 2 pm, EDT, today, Thursday.   Not sure how syndicated the show is beyond Washington, but it can be streamed live  at http://wamu.org/listen/ or  downloaded later on podcast — or both, if you’re really a glutton for talk radio.

Read More

Copyright © 2019. Peace Corps Worldwide.