Archive - June 2018

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“Unleashing the Energy Trapped within Undereducated Girls” by Lisa Einstein (Guinea)
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DRAGONFLY NOTES by Anne Panning (Philippines)
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Peace Corps Response and Global Health Service Partnership end relationship 9/30/18
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“Discovering the Peace Corps . . . and Myself” by Dennis Kuklok (Bolivia)

“Unleashing the Energy Trapped within Undereducated Girls” by Lisa Einstein (Guinea)

  Thanks for the ‘heads up’ from  Patricia Taylor Edmisten (Peru 1962-64) • The energy within undereducated girls must be unleashed by Lia Einstein (Guinea) From Scientific American May 1, 2018   The question on the physics quiz seemed simple enough: “What is the smallest piece of matter that makes up everything in the universe?” Binta’s response: “Binta.” I laughed out loud. You would too if you saw tiny Binta, who is one of my smartest seventh graders. Surely she knew the correct answer is “atom.” Yet, I mused, a famous equation governing atoms could also apply to her. E = mc2. The equation says that under the right conditions, mass can become energy, and vice versa. Because light moves so fast, an atom at rest—even with a small mass—contains a great deal of energy. A walnut has enough energy locked in it to power a small city. Mass from the sun radiates . . .

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DRAGONFLY NOTES by Anne Panning (Philippines)

  Dragonfly Notes: On Distance and Loss, a memoir by Anne Panning (Philippines 1988-90) will be published in September 2018 • When a seemingly routine medical procedure results in her mother’s premature death, Anne Panning is left reeling. In her first full-length memoir, the celebrated essayist draws on decades of memory and experience as she pieces together the hard truths about her own past and her mother’s. We follow Panning’s winding path from rural Minnesota to the riverbanks of Vietnam’s Mekong Delta and all the way back again–a stark, poignant tale of two women deeply connected, yet somehow forever apart. Dragonfly Notes is a testament to the prevailing nature of love, whether in the form of a rediscovered note, a sudden moment of unexpected recall, or sometimes, simply, the sight a dragonfly flitting past. • Anne Panning (Philippines 1988-90) is a celebrated prose writer. Her second collection, Super America (University of Georgia Press, . . .

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Peace Corps Response and Global Health Service Partnership end relationship 9/30/18

  Peace Corps World Wide has received the following official announcement from the Peace Corps Response Office for the Global Health Service. “The Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP), a collaboration between the Peace Corps, the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), and Seed Global Health, will end in September 2018 for operational reasons. We have appreciated our strategic partnership and the opportunity to provide highly skilled physician and nurse educators to build health care capacity and strengthen health professional education.” On its site, Peace Corps described the program: “The Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP) helps address critical global shortages of health care professionals by sending physicians and nurses to work alongside local faculty to build institutional capacity and help strengthen the quality of medical education.” Peace Corps World Wide posted this link to the concept paper in 2012: http://peacecorpsworldwide.org/the-partnership-between-global-health-and-peace-corps-response/ The U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) . . .

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“Discovering the Peace Corps . . . and Myself” by Dennis Kuklok (Bolivia)

  Discovering the Peace Corps … and Myself by Dennis Lloyd Kuklok (Bolivia 1968-70) • It was October, 1967. I had just dropped out of the University of Minnesota, where I was beginning my third year in the School of Architecture. I knew that I would now be drafted, since I would lose my student deferment. So, I volunteered. I wanted to get my military service over as quickly as possible. Then I would be free to do whatever I wanted. At that time, if you volunteered for the draft, you could complete your two years in the army in just 18 months. My university education had made me see how immature, how unworldly I was. It had become painfully apparent how little I really knew about the world in which I was expected to design places for people. I had grown up in a large Catholic midwestern farm family, . . .

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