Archive - July 2013

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Shriver Stories: Sarge's First Words
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Review of Anthony Simeone's (Burkina Faso 1971-73) Connecting Two Worlds: An Environmental Journey from Peace Corps to Present
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Shriver Stories: What Sarge Did For Me
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News on Martha Egan's (Venezuela 1967-69) An Apricot Year
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News in the Spring 2013 Issue of the Authors Guild Bulletin
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April & May & June Books by Peace Corps Writers
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Review of Angene Wilson's Africa on my Mind: Living Peace Corps' Third Goal
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And you Think you get Nasty Rejection Letters

Shriver Stories: Sarge's First Words

This is from Ronald A. Schwarz (Colombia 1961-63). After the Peace Corps he became an anthropologist and spent 12 years in research and training undergraduates in Colombia and Africa. He  taught at Williams College and the Johns Hopkins University and later established a development consulting firm in Africa where he lived for 20 years. He has been writing a book about Colombia One PCVs since their Termination Conference. If you have ever met a Colombia One RPCV, the first thing they will say is their name, and then they’ll  say: “We were the first PCVs. I think that they must have been inoculated with this phrase by their Peace Corps Doctors.) This is Ron’s great piece about Shriver’s first visit to a Training Site in the summer of ’61. Sarge’s First Words “Looking more like the freshman football team than America’s latest weapon in the cold war, the first contingent . . .

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Review of Anthony Simeone's (Burkina Faso 1971-73) Connecting Two Worlds: An Environmental Journey from Peace Corps to Present

Connecting Two Worlds: An Environmental Journey from Peace Corps to Present By Anthony Simeone (Burkina Faso 1971-73) A Peace Corps Writers Book, $19.95 124 Pages 2013 Reviewed by Mike Tidwell (Democratic Republic of the Congo 1985-87) The cover of Anthony Simeone’s memorable but bumpy new book says it all. It shows photographs taken from outer space of Earth and Mars, side by side. One orb has a fertile blue-green hue, radiating the aura life. The other is dark-orange, shadowy, and lifeless. Simeone spends much of the next 124 pages of this short work explaining how environmental degradation inflicted by humans could push the lush green orb to one day more closely resemble the barren-orange orb. Simeone writes in the prologue that his book, Connecting Two Worlds, is also about the “contrast between my life and experiences as a Peace Corps Volunteer in West Africa and my life in the more . . .

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Shriver Stories: What Sarge Did For Me

[About 10 years ago I put up a series of stories about Sarge Shriver  and I thought I might ‘reintroduce’ them as so many PCVs have come-and-gone through the agency since then and they might not know about the man. I remember in the mid-90s when running the New York Recruitment Office an RPCV recruiter came up to me and asked, “Now was Shriver the first Peace Corps Director?” I didn’t know whether I should hit him over the head or fire him! If there is one legend that we want to maintain, it’s Sarge’s…..so send me your experiences with the Man and I’ll post them on our site. We begin with a story sent to me by Thaine H. Allison, Jr., a PCV in Borneo (1962-64) assigned as an agricultural extension agent in the village of Bandau, a place that is now called Kota Marudu, in Sabah Malaysia. Since . . .

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News on Martha Egan's (Venezuela 1967-69) An Apricot Year

An Apricot Year, New Mexico author Martha Egan’s newest novel, is scooping up a bumper crop of prizes this season. Last November the book won two NM/AZ Book Awards, one for Fiction and one for Design. In the last few weeks it has been the recipient of still more kudos. An Apricot Year also won Honorable Mention in the Novels category in the New Mexico Press Women’s 2013 Communications Awards. The Independent Publisher gave it a Bronze IPPY medal for Mountain West Regional Fiction during Book Expo in New York. This is the third of Ms. Egan’s fiction titles to win this prize. On June 28th, An Apricot Year won a Bronze ForeWord Book of the Year Award for Multicultural Fiction announced at the American Library Association annual conference in Chicago. Set in Green Bay, Wisconsin, and Santa Fe, New Mexico, An Apricot Year follows a woman who leaves an . . .

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News in the Spring 2013 Issue of the Authors Guild Bulletin

E-book sales increased by 45 percent in 2012 to make up 20 percent of the trade book market, according to a report released in May be Bookstats….Adult fiction, particularly romance novels, showed the strongest growth in e-book sales….Overall, trade book sales increased 7 percent in 2012. “The growth in trade book sales occurred despite the loss of numerous brick-and-mortar stores in 2012.”… Online retail appears poised to surpass brick-and-mortar stores soon. In other news. At a symposium held on December 12 at the Library of Congress, where the U.S. Copyright Office and the Center for the Book cosponsored a discussion on the part and future role of the professional author, Louisa Thomas, author of Conscience: Two Soldiers, Two Pacifists, One Family-A Test of Will and Faith in World War, make this comment: “I had thought that when I published a book in 2011, the hardest part would be selling the . . .

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April & May & June Books by Peace Corps Writers

Connecting Two Worlds: An Environmental Journey From Peace Corps To Present by Anthony Simeone (Burkina Faso 1971–73) A Peace Corps Writers Book, $19.95 132 pages March 2013 • Africa on My Mind: Educating Americans for Fifty Years, Living Peace Corps’ Third Goal by Angene Wilson (Liberia 1962-64) A Peace Corps Writers Book $10.00 (paperback) 210 pages February 2013 • Gimme Five (Poems) by Philip Dacey (Nigeria 1963–65) Blue Light Press $15.95 55 pages 2013 Strange Stones—Dispatches from East and West By Peter Hessler (China 1996-98) Harper Perennial trade paperback; $14.99 354 pages May 2013 • The Vast Unknown: America’s First Ascent of Everest by Broughton Coburn (Nepal 1973–75) Crown Publishing, $26.00 300 pages April, 2013 • Glimpses through the Forest: Memories of Gabon by Jason Gray (Gabon 2002–04) A Peace Corps Writers Book $14.95 (paperback) 288 pages May 2013 • The Price of Justice: A True Story of Greed and . . .

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Review of Angene Wilson's Africa on my Mind: Living Peace Corps' Third Goal

Africa on My Mind: Living Peace Corps’ Third Goal by Angene Wilson (Liberia 1962–64) A Peace Corps Writers Book $10.00 210 pages February 2013 Reviewed by Julie R. Dargis (Morocco 1984–87) “Once upon a time, I planned to write a novel set in Liberia,” writes Angene Wilson in her recent book, Africa on my Mind. “I was not alone. A number of Peace Corps Volunteers have wanted to be novelists or at least writers of memoirs. My novel would feature Liberians, of course . . . I described Mother Mae . . .. She adjusted the knot of the lappa cloth she’d wrapped around her faded housedress. The lappa was bright blue and red . . .. Behind gold-rimmed glasses, her liquid brown eyes laughed and her voice was gently mocking, but her rather thin lips remained pressed together in a straight line . . ..” Wilson reached out to . . .

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And you Think you get Nasty Rejection Letters

My son found this on tumbir–and you think it is tough to get published! Behold what is either the best or worst rejection letter we have ever seen (depending on your capacity for cruelty), sent to Gertrude Stein in 1912 by publisher Arthur C. Fifield. Given that the manuscript in question became Three Lives (among other things) we suppose she had the last laugh. And as an editor, you can’t help thinking: Just how much time did this guy have on his hands?

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