Day 15 of my Boycott of TSA and the Airlines

What’s bringing me back from despair at the endless incriminating research I’m deliberately exposing myself to for hours each day is the degree to which I can resubmerge once again into wholesome.  This can sound terribly abstract I know, and it’s so difficult to express in words, but I’m going to give it a wee attempt anyway.  Hopefully a lot of you already know what I mean.

It starts with a complaint.  The feeling that something is wrong, or off somehow.

Standing in the “back-scatter” x-ray machine with my arms raised over my head to match the painted figure while getting scrutinized by multiple uniformed agents usually with looks of boredom, annoyance or scorn on their faces, being herded through like prodded cattle, unpacking and repacking items from my luggage, taking off my shoes, blouse (including if it’s over a camisole-like top, even one not meant to be worn exposed in public) and sometimes my jewelry as well– I’m screaming on the inside repeatedly-This is not right!  The opposite of wholesome.  And then comes the secondary screening.

This is a violation of my person and an insult to me.  When we talk about understanding the difference between right and wrong, we KNOW this is wrong.  It feels all kinds of wrong.  We are required to assume the same physical position of someone who has been arrested on the suspicion of an officer of the law that a crime has been committed and that we are the perpetrator.  When I see children and elderly women standing in this way I feel offended.  Now that same right to treat me or anyone else as a suspect has been granted to every TSA agent and who knows who else.

Every time I’m in the security line I’m looking around at perfectly civilized-looking people performing an absurd routine purportedly for our safety.  The rights of each one of us gets violated because there are perhaps a few hundred terrorist-hijackers in the world.  I’m having a gnawing suspicion there aren’t going to be fewer terrorist-hijackers just because they have to try harder at their trade thanks to TSA.

I’m an innocent traveler who has no criminal record.

It is dehumanizing to make citizens repeatedly prove their innocence.  Imagine going through that procedure each time you get on the bus, or train, or subway.  Are these modes of transportation so much safer from terrorist activity?  More likely, are they next on the advanced screening agenda?

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/23/opinion/the-national-security-agencys-domestic-spying-program.html?ref=opinion

There are plenty of us who are complaining but nothing is improving.  It is not the role of government to collect data about its citizens or to treat them like criminals when they travel.

It ends up happening that good well-meaning people, reporters for example, and clergy, get on “special lists” and are harassed around the world. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/09/movies/09oath.html?_r=1

Just like the good Samaritans who tried to help their neighbors in New Orleans after Katrina and were treated like criminals. The sacrifice of individual liberty should not be one surrendered so easily.  And yet each time we fly in this country we are choosing to sacrifice a little piece of it.  That’s fine if some want to choose that or don’t feel the impact of it in the same way as I do, but just recognize and admit that’s what you’re doing.  And then ask, is it making you safer?

And one more thing I just learned, the backscatter x-ray machine has been banned in Europe because of concerns about cancer.  They’re lucky there, they didn’t allow themselves to be force fed GMOs or obscene scanners.

It starts with a complaint, the deep knowing that something is off!

Then the confirmation through collection of significant data—and the annoyance, anger, frustration.  And there stopping in overwhelm and moving along to some other thing that’s needing done in my day, something less unsavory, which is everything else, and can keep me distracted a good long time.

Instead now thanks to this action right here, I remember I’ve committed to solutions.  I recognize my entire state of consciousness must shift before I can begin to think creatively.  How is that done?  Meditation, prayer, yoga, running, it could be anything used to consciously connect to spirit–it can be different for everyone.  The one thing that makes it work though can be explained as something wholesome-something that doesn’t detract from the life or liberty of another.  There’s so little wholesomeness in the world around us now.  It’s lacking in the world at large because it’s lacking in our home, because it’s lacking between us and inside us.  We must cultivate it diligently, individually and collectively.  I consciously choose each time I regress, like just now, to realign with it.

The trick then is from that place of wholesome connection to look beyond the problem to the solution, kind of like trying to see the image “behind” the picture in a piece of 3D hologram art.

Instead of accepting that the return to wholesomeness has curbed the angst that made me want to take action in the first place and so is making me once again happily complacent, I burst out of the inertia looking toward that image and then I take a leap toward it.

I think Andrew Cohen would liken it to Non-Dual Realization acting in Radical Trust.

http://webprod.evolutionaryenlightenment.com/calls/static/guru-pandit.html (August 4th)

In wholesomeness is the knowing we are perpetual beginners.

Follow this blog for the next 11 days and really consider if all this Terrorist Watching is making you feel any safer.

If you think there might be something rotting in OUR House that needs our attention, simply in the comments section write:

Not in my House!