Miscellany

As it says!

1
Sarge Calls JFK About CIA Trying to Place Agents in the Peace Corps
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El Salvador Deemed Too Dangerous For Peace Corps, But Not For Deportees
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The Peace Corps El Salvador Program Suspended
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Harris Wofford Event Wednesday at New York Public Library
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Peace Corps Volunteers petition to reinstate sexual assault victims’ advocate who was pushed out
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Gearan Center for the Performing Arts–Former Peace Corps Director (1995-99) Honored at HWS College
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Julie R. Dargis (Morocco 1984-87) Asks: What MORE Can You Do For Your Country?
8
Nancy Tongue (Chile 1980-82) Letter to Washington Post: Medical care for Peace Corps volunteers delayed
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Inspector General Recent Report on the Peace Corps
10
Bob Vila (Panama 1969-70) And His Hemingway Connection

Sarge Calls JFK About CIA Trying to Place Agents in the Peace Corps

In July 1962, in an effort to preserve an accurate record of Presidential decision-making in a highly charged atmosphere of conflicting viewpoints, strategies and tactics, John F. Kennedy installed hidden recording systems in the Oval Office and in the Cabinet Room. The result is a priceless historical archive comprising some 265 hours of taped material. JFK was elected president when Civil Rights tensions were near the boiling point, and Americans feared a nuclear war. Confronted with complex dilemmas necessitating swift and unprecedented action, President Kennedy engaged in intense discussion and debate with his cabinet members and other advisors. Now, in conjunction with the fiftieth anniversary of the Kennedy presidency, the John F. Kennedy Library and historian Ted Widmer have carefully selected the most compelling and important of these remarkable recordings for release, fully restored and re-mastered onto two 75-minute CDs for the first time. Listening In represents a uniquely unscripted, . . .

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El Salvador Deemed Too Dangerous For Peace Corps, But Not For Deportees

Thanks to a “heads up” from Tom Hebert (Nigeria 1962-64) this story from The Huffington Post El Salvador Deemed Too Dangerous For Peace Corps, But Not For Deportees The Central American country is on track to become the homicide capital of the world. Elise Foley Immigration & Politics Reporter The Huffington Post Emergency workers gather bodies after at least five people were killed, allegedly by gang members, in Ciudad Delgado on the outskirts of San Salvador, El Salvador. The Obama administration considers El Salvador too dangerous for Peace Corps volunteers, but will continue to send mothers and children with orders for deportation to the country. The Peace Corps announced Monday that it is temporarily suspending its El Salvador program “due to the ongoing security environment.” “Volunteers’ health, safety and security are the Peace Corps’ top priorities,” the agency said in a statement. “More than 2,300 Peace Corps volunteers have worked on . . .

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The Peace Corps El Salvador Program Suspended

WASHINGTON, D.C., January 11, 2016 – The Peace Corps today announced the suspension of its program in El Salvador due to the ongoing security environment. The agency will continue to monitor the security situation in collaboration with the U.S. Embassy in San Salvador to determine when the program can resume. The Peace Corps has enjoyed a long partnership with the government and people of El Salvador and is committed to resuming volunteers’ work there in a safe and secure environment. Volunteers’ health, safety and security are the Peace Corps’ top priorities. More than 2,300 Peace Corps volunteers have worked on community and youth development projects in communities throughout El Salvador since the program was established in 1962. PROGRAM OVERVIEW In 1962 the government of El Salvador invited Peace Corps into the country, and in April of that year the first 20 Peace Corps Volunteers to serve in El Salvador arrived.  By 1977, . . .

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Harris Wofford Event Wednesday at New York Public Library

Event Information By: Corporation for Civic Documentaries Event Description Support the upcoming documentary film on Harris Wofford and join us for an evening withSenator Wofford at the New York Public Library. As a special web offer, we are offering a limited number of tickets at $50 (normally $150) to enjoy the event and the reception afterwards, hosted by New York Public Library CEO Anthony Marx. The evening begins with an exclusive preview of the upcoming documentary on Harris Wofford, featuring Senator Ted Kennedy, Rep. John Lewis, James Carville, Bill Moyers, and others.  Anthony Marx then interviews Harris Wofford about the themes of the film, including national service, advancing Civil Rights with Martin Luther King and President Kennedy, helping to start the Peace Corps, and fighting for national health care in the U.S. Senate, and we will hear from other special guests. RSVP today, this special offer is only available for a limited time! . . .

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Peace Corps Volunteers petition to reinstate sexual assault victims’ advocate who was pushed out

The Peace Corps was mandated by Congress to hire its first advocate for victims of sexual assault. Now the agency has pushed her out. By Lisa Rein January 11 at 6:00 AM Washington Post (Courtesy of Kellie Greene) Two hundred current and returned Peace Corps volunteers around the world have signed a petition to Congress to reinstate an outspoken advocate for victims of sexual assault who was pushed out four years after lawmakers demanded that the agency show it was serious about volunteers’ security. “Survivors and their allies are asking for the immediate reinstatement of Kellie Greene as Director of Office of Victims Advocacy,” says the petition started on Change.org in December. “Kellie Greene has proven herself to be a fierce advocate for Peace Corps Volunteers who become victims of crimes during their Peace Corps Service,” the petition says. “She holds Peace Corps to a incredibly high but necessary standard. She has ushered in . . .

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Gearan Center for the Performing Arts–Former Peace Corps Director (1995-99) Honored at HWS College

Gearan Center for the Performing Arts The new performing arts building at the heart of the Hobart and William Smith campus – which will unite academic and performance spaces for theatre, music,dance, and media and society – has been officially named the Gearan Center for the Performing Arts in honor of President Mark D. Gearan and Mary Herlihy Gearan. Mark and Mary Herlihy Gearan and their daughter Kathleen listen as Chair of the Board of Trustees Maureen Collins Zupan announces the naming of the building The announcement was made on Friday, Oct. 23 during a commemorative cornerstone installation which brought together students, faculty, staff, alums, the Board of Trustees and the Alumni and Alumnae Councils to celebrate the occasion in advance of the Center’s grand opening in January 2016. The largest project in the history of the Colleges, the fundraising goal of $28 million for the 65,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art facility was surpassed . . .

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Julie R. Dargis (Morocco 1984-87) Asks: What MORE Can You Do For Your Country?

Wake Up, Peace Corps! Lest you think me crazy, or worse, an irritant, let me assure you that I am not tying to shame. I am advocating for civilized debate. Yet, as Americans we are more interested in one man’s scripted quest for love then we are about our own welfare and that of our neighbors. On Monday, 7.5 million Americans in the 18-49 age group tuned into Season 20 of the Bachelor. Many were disappointed that there was only one brown-eyed crazy, although their interest was piqued with the inclusion of a set of blonde twins. How do I know this?  I also tuned in, spiking the documented viewers with the addition of the 50-78 demographic. Meanwhile, across the pond, the petition to ban Donald Trump from entering the UK was put on the docket in Parliament. The debate is scheduled to appear on www.parliamentlive.tv on January 18, 2016. . . .

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Nancy Tongue (Chile 1980-82) Letter to Washington Post: Medical care for Peace Corps volunteers delayed

January 4 at 4:55 PM The Dec. 24 Federal Eye article “Returned Peace Corps volunteers face long waits for health care, report says ” [The Fed Page], about the health and resulting financial issues facing up to 30 percent of the more than 220,000 returned Peace Corps volunteers, failed to mention that even those sick or injured volunteers who commit nearly full-time work to pursuing a worker’s compensation claim through the Labor Department still cannot receive more than about $21,000 annually in loss-of-wage earnings and must insure themselves for any non-service-related health issues. In forming a new task force, the Peace Corps indicated that after 30 years it was finally hearing the cries for reform. But no outside agency holds the Peace Corps accountable for improvements. Legislative reform is required to increase the disability income value and to change laws to improve ways the Peace Corps can pay for volunteers’ medical care. There . . .

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Inspector General Recent Report on the Peace Corps

The Peace Corps’ Office of Inspector General (IGO) today is directed by a woman named Kathy A. Buller. The IG Office does not report to the Peace Corps Director, though they work in the same building and I am told Kathy and Carrie are friendly. You might they are “equal” though, as we know, some are more “equal” than others. Ms. Buller has a reputation, I’m told, of wanting to increase her own status in DC by being a touch SOB. (Not surprising, knowing government career types.) The IG Office has few friends. (Where is the famous Charlie Peters and his gang of Evaluators from the early days of the agency? We need them again. Everyone loved Charlie! ) IG employees get a lot of flak. And there are plenty of stories about them.  When I was in DC several years ago I heard about another IG, another woman, and . . .

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Bob Vila (Panama 1969-70) And His Hemingway Connection

It’s been a year since the U.S. and Cuba began normalizing relations. Tourism, business and cultural exchanges are booming. And there is another curious benefactor of those warmer ties – Ernest Hemingway, or at least, his legacy. The writer lived just outside of Havana for 20 years, and that house, called the Finca Vigia, has long been a national museum. But years of hot, humid Caribbean weather has taken a toll on the author’s thousands of papers and books. A Boston-based foundation is helping restore those weathered treasures, and who better to lead that effort than the original dean of home repairs: Bob Vila, of public televison’s This Old House. He tells NPR’s Carrie Kahn that he has a personal connection to Cuba. “I’m American-born Cuban,” he says. “My Havana-born parents emigrated during the latter part of World War II, and I was born in Miami, raised there and partially in . . .

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