Literary Type

News of writers who have served in the Peace Corps.

1
Ron Arias (Peru) launches THE WETBACK AND OTHER STORIES
2
Ellen Urbani’s dedication to stop Trump (Guatemala)
3
The Theroux Boys
4
John James Quinn (Zaire) publishes academic book on Sub-Saharan Africa
5
RPCV journalist Christopher Miller (Ukraine)
6
RPCV author Marne Mueller gives talk — “The Color of Citizenship: The Impact of the Japanese-American Internment during World War II”
7
Peace Corps Writer Awards for 2016
8
The Passing of Poet Phil Dacey (Nigeria)
9
Terry A. AmRhein’s Democracy on the Edge wins book award (Swaziland)
10
“Annotated Bibliography of Peace Corps Writers’ Books in the Library of Congress”

Ron Arias (Peru) launches THE WETBACK AND OTHER STORIES

  This is from today’s LaBloga:   The Wetback and Other Stories marks Ron Arias’ (Peru 1963-65) return to fiction after a career in non-fiction reporting from across the globe for People Magazine. The book brings together fourteen previously published stories, along with two new pieces. Arte Publico Press publishes The Wetback and Other Stories. Here’s a podcast of Arias discussing the collection https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/larb-radio-hour/id998390884?mt=2 • The Wetback and Other Stories Ron Arias (Peru 1963–65) Arte Publico Press September 2016 160 pages $17.95 (paperback)  

Read More

Ellen Urbani’s dedication to stop Trump (Guatemala)

In an effort to speak truth to power in the way I am best able, I wrote and contributed a short personal essay to a movement called Dedicate Your No-Trump Vote. While this started as a collection of stories from Pulitzer Prize-winning and bestselling novelists, it quickly expanded to include not just writers but a military personnel, teachers, community activists, etc — all of whom are thinking beyond the individual and dedicating their votes as acts of hope for the future.  If you’re inclined to share, my dedication is here: https://dedicateyournotrumpvote.blogspot.com/2016/10/ellen-urbanis-dedication.html  Though it often feels I’m preaching to the choir, I also know that every voice raised is a chance to potentially reach someone who may not yet have considered a particular perspective that might give him/her pause. Thank you, Ellen Urbani (Guatemala 1991-93)   Monday, October 3, 2016 When I was 23, I was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Guatemala, a country then . . .

Read More

The Theroux Boys

Paul Theroux’s (Malawi 1963-65) son Louis Theroux’s documentary on Jimmy Savile will be broadcasted on Sunday 2 October at 21:00 on BBC Two Louis says, “I was at my wedding in July 2012 when I learned that the DJ and TV presenter Jimmy Savile was to be unmasked as a sexual predator in an upcoming ITV documentary. At that time, I imagined I knew Savile reasonably well. I’d made my own documentary about him in 2000, filming with him for about two weeks at his various homes around Britain. I’d stayed in contact for several years after the film went out, making occasional trips up to Leeds. There was always a professional pretext – a DVD commentary to record, a new series to promote – but the visits also had a social dimension. They usually involved a meal at a local restaurant and sometimes an overnight stay at his penthouse . . .

Read More

John James Quinn (Zaire) publishes academic book on Sub-Saharan Africa

  In late 2015 John James Quinn published Global Geopolitical Power and African Political and Economic Institutions: When Elephants Fight, an academic book on sub-Saharan Africa political and economic institutions from an international relations perspective. Quinn teaches political science at Truman State University (that’s in Missouri) and is editor of the McNair Scholarly Review. What is most impressive about the book is the price: Hardback $110.00; eBook $104.50 Here’s the blurb on Amazon about the book. Global Geopolitical Power and African Political and Economic Institutions: When Elephants Fight describes the emergence and nature of the prevailing African political and economic institutions in two periods. In the first, most countries adopted political and economic institutions that funneled significant levels of political and economic power to the political elites, usually through one- or no-party (military) political systems, inward-oriented development policies, and/ or state-led—and often state-owned—industrialization. In the second period, most countries adopted institutions that . . .

Read More

RPCV journalist Christopher Miller (Ukraine)

  Alana DeJoseph (Mali 1992-94) who is working on a film about the Peace Corps entitled, The Towering Task,  has just been filming PCVs in Ukraine and alerted me to a former Peace Corps Volunteer in the Ukraine, Chris Miller (Ukraine 2010-2012). Alana writes, “Miller is a highly respected journalist in Ukraine now and does much reporting on the conflict in the east of the country.”   As a PCV, Miller was a Youth Developer Volunteer. He taught, as he writes on Linked In, “English, volunteerism, journalism, IT, healthy living, employment skills, teamwork and sports to Ukrainian youth. I was responsible for the organization of seminars, retreats and camps specializing in sustainable teaching of healthy lifestyles topics by Ukrainian nationals and future PCVs, as well as NGO development. I organized and instructed clubs for local youth, including English clubs, journalism clubs and sports clubs.”   Alana was kind enough to forward to . . .

Read More

RPCV author Marne Mueller gives talk — “The Color of Citizenship: The Impact of the Japanese-American Internment during World War II”

  On Sunday, September 18, at 4pm, the Hotchkiss Library in  Sharon, Conn. will present, ‘The Color of Citizenship: The Impact of the Japanese-American Internment during World War II.” Author and Sharon resident Marnie Mueller (Ecuador 1963-65) will relate her experiences growing up as a Caucasian with her parents in the Tule Lake camp in northern California. A theme of Mueller’s talk is the relationship she sees between the internment camps and the current political climate. Refreshments. Registration preferred. For further information or to reserve a seat, please call the library, 860 364-5041.

Read More

Peace Corps Writer Awards for 2016

  The Paul Cowan Non-Fiction Award First given in 1990 this Award was named to honor Paul Cowan, a Peace Corps Volunteer who served in Ecuador. Cowan wrote The Making of An Un-American about his experiences as a Volunteer in Latin America in the sixties. A longtime activist and political writer for The Village Voice, Cowan died of leukemia in 1988. Winner of the 2016 Paul Cowan Non-Fiction Award  The Great Surge: The Ascent of the Developing World  by Steven Radelet (Western Samoa 1981-83) • The Maria Thomas Fiction Award This Award is named after the novelist Maria Thomas [Roberta Worrick (Ethiopia 1971–73)] who was the author of a well-reviewed novel and two collections of short stories all set in Africa. She lost her life in August, 1989, while working in Ethiopia for a relief agency. She went down in the plane crash that killed Congressman Mickey Leland of Texas. Winner of the Maria Thomas Fiction . . .

Read More

The Passing of Poet Phil Dacey (Nigeria)

  I recently learned the sad news that Phil Dacey (Nigeria 1963-65) died in Minneapolis on July 7, 2016, at age 77, after a nearly two-year struggle with acute leukemia. Phil won the Peace Corps Writers Poetry Award in 2000 for his collection, The Deathbed Playboy. He also won three Pushcart Prizes and the Discovery Award from the Poetry Center of the 92nd Street YM-YWHA. Phil was the recipient of a Woodrow Wilson fellowship from Stanford University as well as fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Minnesota State Arts Board, the Bush Foundation, and the Loft-McKnight Foundation. He served as poet- or writer-in-residence at Wichita State University, the University of Idaho, and Minnesota State University at Mankato. While teaching at Southwest State Minnesota University, Dacey founded the Marshall Festivals, the Minnesota Writers’ Festival, and the International Film Series. He lived in Minneapolis until his death. Over the . . .

Read More

Terry A. AmRhein’s Democracy on the Edge wins book award (Swaziland)

  Democracy on the Edge, a Discussion of Political Issues in America by Terry A. AmRhein (Swaziland 1973-75) has been named the “Best Political Book” of 2016 by Pacific Book Review. AmRhein graduated from the University of Virginia with a Bachelor of Science degree in physics, and while in the Peace Corps he taught science and technology at the Swaziland Institute of Technology. After his tour he worked briefly as the National Advocacy Coordinator for the NPCA. Since his Peace Corps years, Terry has spent most of his career in the field of power generation. While working he also earned masters degrees in mechanical engineering and in business and was a professional engineer in New York State. Terry has published one other book, The Newcomers Guide to Winning Local Elections.

Read More

“Annotated Bibliography of Peace Corps Writers’ Books in the Library of Congress”

  The following is the introduction to a PDF file of a bibliography of Peace Corps writers’ books prepared by the Library of Congress. The listing drew on a Peace Corps Writers listing last updated in 2011.: ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY OF PEACE CORPS WRITERS’ BOOKS IN THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS REVISED AND UPDATED NOVEMBER 2015 Rex A. Hudson, Federal Research Division ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This bibliography owes its existence to an exchange of letters between Rep. John Garamendi (Ethiopia, 1966–68) and Dr. James Billington, who served as the 13th the Librarian of Congress (September 1987–September 2015). In his letter of December 17, 2010 [see http://peacecorpsworldwide.org/pc-writers/files/2011/01/letter.pdf] (sic— link does not work), the Honorable Rep. Garamendi asked Dr. Billington to mark the special 50th anniversary of the Peace Corps on September 22, 2011, “by establishing a collection of books about the Peace Corps experience written by former Peace Corps Volunteers and Peace Corps staff.” In response, Dr. . . .

Read More

Copyright © 2016. Peace Corps Worldwide.