Author - John Coyne

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Philippines’s First Peace Corps Staff (Part Two)
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William Josephson, First Peace Corps Lawyer
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Philippines’s First Peace Corps Staff (Part One)
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EVERYWHERE STORIES: VOLUME III edited by Clifford Garstang (South Korea)
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Charlie Peters, First Director of Peace Corps Evaluation
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Richard Wiley (Korea) publishes TACOMA STORIES
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“An Example for Government” (Part Two)
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Kennedy signed Peace Corps Act — Up for Auction!
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“An Example for Government” from Who’s Who in The Peace Corps
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Who’s Who in The Peace Corps Washington

Philippines’s First Peace Corps Staff (Part Two)

Harris Wofford, the principal founder of the Student Federalists, had been the organization’s first president. Fuchs, then a student at New York University, followed tradition when he became president by interrupting his studies to spend one year traveling and speaking. He had already postponed his college work once before, when he served a wartime stint in the Navy Hospital Corps. But he had his Phi Deta Kappa key in 1950 when, at the age of 23, he graduated with honors in political science. Five years later, he received his Ph.D. from Harvard, three years after he had already joined the faculty at Brandeis University. By 1959, Dean of Faculty at Brandeis, he had already written two books, The Political Behavior of American Jews and a lengthy social and political history of Hawaii entitled Hawaii Pono. As an activist as well as a theoretician inn politics, Fuchs was receptive to the . . .

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William Josephson, First Peace Corps Lawyer

In September, 1958, Bill Josephson went to England to write a doctoral dissertation in history at St. Antony’s College, one of the two graduate colleges at Oxford University. He set himself what he still describes as “a fascinating thesis problem: what were the other Americans, other than President Wilson and Colonel House, doing at the Paris Peace Conference in 1919? “The American delegation included numbers of people who were to become first magnitude figures—Lippmann, Grew, Bullitt, Frankfurter, Dulles, Baruch”—but exactly what they were doing from day to day has by and large remained a mystery.” Fascinating or not, the thesis was never completed because the young lawyer met Diana Hayward Bailey, a London girl whom he proceeded to court and marry. On the other side of the world, one Earl Reynolds had just stated an anti-bomb demonstration by sailing his yacht, Phoenix, into the Pacific testing area. Just before leaving . . .

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Philippines’s First Peace Corps Staff (Part One)

On its second birthday, March 1, 1963, the Peace Corps counted 624 Volunteers at work in the Philippines. Except for 22 men assigned to a rural community action program in the large southern island of Mindanao, the so-called “Texas of the Philippines,” all the Volunteers, men and women, were employed as teachers—some at the university and secondary levels but most of them in elementary schools. This meant that the Philippines was the setting for the largest single overseas educational program that the United States had ever mounted. It was also by a considerable margin the largest program in the Peace Corps—and would continue to be so for 10 more months. As the Peace Corps planned the program in conformance with requests from the Philippines government—the republic served as host to 650 Volunteers by the autumn of 1963, some of whom were assigned for the first time to the lushly tropical . . .

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EVERYWHERE STORIES: VOLUME III edited by Clifford Garstang (South Korea)

  Everywhere Stories: Short Fiction from a Small Planet, Volume III Edited by Clifford Garstang (South Korea 1976-77) Press 53 Publisher October 2018 196 pages $19.95 (paperback)   The third anthology in the series travels to 20 more countries Press 53 announces the publication on October 16, 2018, of Everywhere Stories: Short Fiction from a Small Planet, Volume III, an anthology of 20 stories by 20 authors set in 20 countries. With a theme of “It’s an Adventurous World,” this exciting addition to the Everywhere Stories series, edited by award-winning author Clifford Garstang, takes readers on a journey around the globe: to a mysterious discovery in Mongolia, to an expedition in the Australian Outback, to revolution in Chile, and to more stories in countries on every continent. Contributors include Ben Berman [Zimbabwe 1998–2000] (Strange Borderlands, Figuring in the Figure), J. Thomas Brown (The Land of Three Houses), E. Shaskan Bumas . . .

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Charlie Peters, First Director of Peace Corps Evaluation

By a common rule of politics, freshmen legislators are expected to keep their mouths closed and their ears open. Carlie Peters managed to shatter the rule without rousing so much as a dirty look. The fact that he may have set a record for first-term accomplishment in the West Virginia House of Delegates is, he admits, due to at least one unusual circumstance. “I had already served two years as clerk of the House Judiciary Committee,” Peter explains. “So I knew the other Delegates—and they knew me—before I was elected. Afterward, I was in quite a different position than if I had been a perfect stranger. I was a familiar figure in the Capitol and no one thought I was trying to be a whiz kid by pushing legislation.” In this situation, Peters went ahead—and rolled up a remarkable score. He drafted and sponsored the state’s first civil service law. . . .

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Richard Wiley (Korea) publishes TACOMA STORIES

Richard Wiley (Korea 1967–69) has a  new collection of stories from and about his hometown, Tacoma, Washington. As Richard writes, My first job was as a bicycle repairman when I was fourteen years old. I was fired pretty quickly for not being able to repair bicycles. I was a bartender at the Old St. Louis Tavern when I was twenty. After that, I worked at Pat’s Tavern, site of the first of my Tacoma Stories, from which all of the following stories stream. In the first story, Becky Welles, daughter of the famous thespian, Orson, says the following: “Do you think a town can act as a hedge against the unabated loneliness of the human heart…? The entire idea for this collection came out of one night’s drinking at Pat’s Tavern back in 1968 (it was really 1967, but I changed the date). Originally, I peopled this story with folks I had . . .

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“An Example for Government” (Part Two)

It was apparent from the beginning that we would need talented people in the Maiatico Building, (the first Peace Corps HQ, across from Lafayette Square and the White House) who had wide experience in government work. The question was—how would we find them? We followed the principle that one good man would bring another. So Warren Wiggins got us Jack Young from NASA, a demon of energy and creativity who organized our management services. Jack Young got us Bill Kelly, who was the man at NASA in charge of efficiently moving such things as Saturn boosters from Huntsville, Alabama to Cape Canaveral. We decided he would be just the man to solve the problems of how best to transport Peace Corps Volunteers from the United States to the ends of the earth. Bill came to us on 3 days’ notice and he has performed one of the most outstanding jobs in . . .

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Kennedy signed Peace Corps Act — Up for Auction!

  Thanks for the ‘heads up’ from William Evensen (Peru 1964-66) Current Auction Is Open For Bidding Our Current Auction Closes Nov 07         #59 – John F. Kennedy Signed Peace Corps Act Page Estimate: $10,000+ Page of the Peace Corps Act signed by President Kennedy Partial DS as president, signed “John F. Kennedy,” one page, 10 x 14, September 22, 1961. The seventh page of an early official printing of H. R. 7500, ‘An Act to provide for a Peace Corps to help the peoples of interested countries and areas in meeting their needs for skilled manpower,’ otherwise known as the ‘Peace Corps Act,’ boldly signed in the lower margin by President Kennedy. This section of the document outlines the general powers and authorities granted to the president under the act, and it appears to be from a printer’s proof of the act: an erroneous quotation mark . . .

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“An Example for Government” from Who’s Who in The Peace Corps

Sargent Shriver Writes (Letter edited for length) I hope this booklet—Who’s Who in The Peace Corps—will give Peace Corps Volunteers in the field a little information about the quality and the background of the members of the Washington staff. Nothing that I could say about the dedication and ability of these men and women could improve upon the assessment of them made by President Kennedy last June 14 when he said that they “have brought to government service a sense of morale and a sense of enthusiasm and, really, commitment, which has been absent from too many governmental agencies for too many years.” He went on to say that he believes that the members of the Peace Corps/Washington staff “have set an example for government service which I hope will be infectious”. Vital as these people are, however, not one of them is more important to the Peace Corps than . . .

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Who’s Who in The Peace Corps Washington

The Peace Corps Washington Staff Simple addition would reveal that the Peace Corps administrators in Washington during its first years had lived abroad for a total of about four centuries. They had visited or stayed at length in every nation on earth. The cumulative lifetime travel mileage of the Washington staff added up to thirty or more round trips to the moon. One staff member all by himself use to log 150,000 miles a year as part of a former job. Such statistics are only mentioned because they indicate a familiarity with the broad world, an acquaintance with the far corners of the earth that were necessary in an agency that focused beyond the near horizon. The Peace Corps staff in Washington, D.C. came from every possible background, from all economic levels, and from every part of the country. They included skiers, mountains climbers, big-game hunters, prizefighters, football players, polo . . .

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