Author - John Coyne

1
RPCV Ambassadors: Not Male, Pale or Yale
2
Marnie Mueller (Ecuador) — Her Early Life Interned As A Child
3
First Peace Corps Volunteer to die in service memorialized in Bolivar, MO 56 years after his death
4
Paul Theroux (Malawi): On travel and travel writing from BBC
5
New books by Peace Corps writers — May 2018
6
Review — BORDER PENANCE by Lawrence F. Lihosit (Honduras)
7
Sex & $$$ in The Peace Corps IG Investigations (Washington, DC)
8
Health Justice for Peace Corps Volunteers
9
“Unleashing the Energy Trapped within Undereducated Girls” by Lisa Einstein (Guinea)
10
DRAGONFLY NOTES by Anne Panning (Philippines)

RPCV Ambassadors: Not Male, Pale or Yale

  One of JFK’s most famous speeches was given in the old Cow Palace Auditorium in San Francisco, on November 2, 1960, six days before the presidential election. It was Kennedy’s last major address before the election. It was a speech of six single-spaced pages, less than 3000 words. Written by Ted Sorenson and JFK it was entitled, “Staffing A Foreign Policy For Peace.” In it Kennedy proposed a new government agency, “The Peace Corps” using that name for the very first time. And with the “Peace Corps” Kennedy  envisioned a way to change America’s diplomatic service. Kennedy began by demonstrating how ill-equipped our foreign service was, pointing out that the Lenin Institute for Political Warfare exported, each year, hundreds of agents to disrupt free institutions in the uncommitted world. Kennedy said, “A friend of mine visiting the Soviet Union last year met a young Russian couple studying Swahili and African . . .

Read More

Marnie Mueller (Ecuador) — Her Early Life Interned As A Child

  Marnie Mueller (Ecuador 1963–65) was born in the Tule Lake Japanese American Segregation Camp in northern California where her Caucasian parents went to work to try to make an intolerable situation tolerable for the people imprisoned there. Her father, a pacifist and an economist, active in the progressive Co-operative Movement, was responsible for working with the internees — Nisei, Kibei, and Issei — to set up the camp wide member operated co-op store system; her mother signed on to teach in the camp schools.   “My parents had gone there by choice to try to help people who were incarcerated.  And while they worked, I was lovingly cared for by an Issei husband and wife. This is not to say that there weren’t difficult personal repercussions on me and my family, but it’s taking me an entire book to try to come to terms with it.” Marnie is the author . . .

Read More

First Peace Corps Volunteer to die in service memorialized in Bolivar, MO 56 years after his death

• A memorial service was held in Bolivar, Missouri on April 22nd for David Crozier and Larry Radley organized by the Missouri RPCV group. These PCVs were the first two Volunteers who gave their lives in service. April 22nd was the 56th anniversary of the day they died, April 22, 1962. Speaking at the event were Larry’s brother Gordan Radley (Malawi 1968-70), his sister, Elena Radley Rozenman (Colombia 1963-65), PCA president Glenn Blumhorst (Guatemala 1988-91), and others. You can see the service on this video.   Columbia, MO – On April 22, 2018 Returned Peace Corps Volunteers from around Missouri and the United States gathered in Bolivar, MO, at Dunnegan Memorial Park and Greenwood Cemetery to remember David Crozier. Crozier died in a plane accident on April 22, 1962, in Colombia, South America. With fellow Peace Corps Volunteer Larry Radley, who also perished, they were the first Peace Corps Volunteers worldwide to die in . . .

Read More

Paul Theroux (Malawi): On travel and travel writing from BBC

  The godfather of contemporary travel writing tells us about the trip that made him fall in love with the world, as well as a reborn Hawaii and the influence of his son, Louis. by Alexander Bisley BBC/Travel 14 June 2018 • Paul Theroux (Malawi 1963-65) is the godfather of contemporary travel writing, known for his transporting, first-person classics such as Ghost Train to the Eastern Star, Deep South, The Tao of Travell and Dark Star Safari. “Travel in an uncertain world. . . has never seemed to me more essential, of greater importance or more enlightening.” In his new collection of travel essays, Figures in a Landscape, Theroux is once again bracingly perceptive and enticing on places and people. He is ever captivating on Africa, the continent that gave him a lifelong love of travel. Hawaii, one of his two homes ─ and where he conducts this interview from ─ is a particularly . . .

Read More

New books by Peace Corps writers — May 2018

  To purchase any of these books from Amazon.com — Click on the book cover, the bold book title, or the publishing format you would like — and Peace Corps Worldwide, an Amazon Associate, will receive a small remittance from your purchase that will help support the site and the annual Peace Corps Writers awards. We are now including a one-sentence description — provided by the author — for the books listed here in hopes of encouraging readers  1) to order the book and 2) to volunteer to review it. See a book you’d like to review for Peace Corps Worldwide? Send a note to Marian at peacecorpsworldwide@gmail.com, and we’ll send you a copy along with a few instructions. • Jamie’s Muse by Bonnie Lee Black (Gabon 1996-98) Nighthawk Press May 11, 2018 248 pages $15.00 (paperback) The lost history of Bonnie Lee Black’s Scottish great-grandmother, Helen, has haunted the author for years. Why, as young newlyweds, did Helen and . . .

Read More

Review — BORDER PENANCE by Lawrence F. Lihosit (Honduras)

  Border Penance (short stories) Lawrence F. Lihosit ( (Honduras 1975–77) CreateSpace February 2018 (originally published in 2009) 128 pages $10.95 (paperback) Reviewed by David H. Greegor (Mexico 2007–11) • Earlier this year I reviewed Mr. Lihosit’s book, Americruise, which I found to be a fun and eventually engaging read once I came to understand his wacky humor.  Border Penance, a set of six serious short stories set in Mexico and Central America, was intended to be suspense-filled. I found them mildly interesting, but not suspenseful. Furthermore, the stories varied considerably in their coherence and quality. The first story, Holiday Obituary, was so confusing I had to read it twice and even then it didn’t seem to match the synopsis that Mr. Lihosit included. One of the problems that the author has is that he puts too much extraneous, unrelated detail into his stories so that the reader can’t follow the thread. . . .

Read More

Sex & $$$ in The Peace Corps IG Investigations (Washington, DC)

  Peace Corps Office of Inspector General — Semi-annual Report to Congress The Investigation Unit is authorized to investigate waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement in both domestic and international Peace Corps programs and operations. OIG investigators have full law enforcement authority including the authority, upon probable cause, to seek and execute warrants for arrest, search premises, and seize evidence. They are authorized to make arrests without a warrant while engaged in official duties and to carry firearms. The unit investigates allegations of both criminal wrongdoing and administrative misconduct involving Peace Corps staff, contractors, Volunteers, and other individuals conducting transactions with the Peace Corps. Allegations are made by Peace Corps stakeholders such as Volunteers, trainees, staff, contractors, other federal entities, and the general public. OIG receives these allegations through audits, evaluations, hotline complaints, and other means. In addition, OIG relies upon the investigative support of the U.S. Department of State Diplomatic Security Service (DSS). Criminal and Misconduct Related Investigations In 2009, Peace . . .

Read More

Health Justice for Peace Corps Volunteers

  Legislative Update June 8, 2018 Nancy E. Tongue, Sara T. Thompson, Jennifer Mamola • BOTH THE HOUSE AND THE SENATE legislation have been written, reviewed and revised by Congress and we expect that both will go to the House of Representatives for a final vote by the Chamber in the very near future. We will make an announcement when that occurs. Sadly, neither the House nor the Senate pending legislation has included what we have fought so hard for. Many may see the legislation as a step forward, regardless. However, those of us who have invested our lives in obtaining appropriate legislation for those who return sick and injured are crushed that the key reforms that we at Health Justice for Peace Corps Volunteers, and all Volunteers, desperately need have been eliminated or not included. We recognize that gaining any legislation in this political climate is an accomplishment. We . . .

Read More

“Unleashing the Energy Trapped within Undereducated Girls” by Lisa Einstein (Guinea)

  Thanks for the ‘heads up’ from  Patricia Taylor Edmisten (Peru 1962-64) • The energy within undereducated girls must be unleashed by Lia Einstein (Guinea) From Scientific American May 1, 2018   The question on the physics quiz seemed simple enough: “What is the smallest piece of matter that makes up everything in the universe?” Binta’s response: “Binta.” I laughed out loud. You would too if you saw tiny Binta, who is one of my smartest seventh graders. Surely she knew the correct answer is “atom.” Yet, I mused, a famous equation governing atoms could also apply to her. E = mc2. The equation says that under the right conditions, mass can become energy, and vice versa. Because light moves so fast, an atom at rest—even with a small mass—contains a great deal of energy. A walnut has enough energy locked in it to power a small city. Mass from the sun radiates . . .

Read More

DRAGONFLY NOTES by Anne Panning (Philippines)

  Dragonfly Notes: On Distance and Loss, a memoir by Anne Panning (Philippines 1988-90) will be published in September 2018 • When a seemingly routine medical procedure results in her mother’s premature death, Anne Panning is left reeling. In her first full-length memoir, the celebrated essayist draws on decades of memory and experience as she pieces together the hard truths about her own past and her mother’s. We follow Panning’s winding path from rural Minnesota to the riverbanks of Vietnam’s Mekong Delta and all the way back again–a stark, poignant tale of two women deeply connected, yet somehow forever apart. Dragonfly Notes is a testament to the prevailing nature of love, whether in the form of a rediscovered note, a sudden moment of unexpected recall, or sometimes, simply, the sight a dragonfly flitting past. • Anne Panning (Philippines 1988-90) is a celebrated prose writer. Her second collection, Super America (University of Georgia Press, . . .

Read More

Copyright © 2016. Peace Corps Worldwide.