Author - John Coyne

1
Review — FIGURES IN A LANDSCAPE by Paul Theroux (Malawi)
2
Jenny Phillips (Lesotho), writer and award-winning filmmaker, dies at 76
3
Peace Corps Porn
4
Finding “Teranga” from Senegal to the streets of Paris by Carrie Knowlton (Senegal)
5
RPCV Who Served with Distinction in the Foreign Service (Ethiopia)
6
Lawrence F. Lihosit (Honduras) new PEACE CORPS BIBLIOGRAPHY
7
Carole Sojka Interviewed on DESTINATION MYSTERY (Somalia)
8
“Remembering Peace Corps work: ‘It was our job to save the world’” (Tanganyika)
9
The Museum of the Peace Corps Experience
10
Do Africans Want Peace Corps Volunteers?

Review — FIGURES IN A LANDSCAPE by Paul Theroux (Malawi)

  Figures in a Landscape: People and Places Essays: 2001-2016 By Paul Theroux (Malawi 1963-65) Eamon Dolan/Houghton Miffin Harcourt 416 pages May 2018 $28.00 (hardcover),  $15.64(paperback), $15.99 (Kindle) Reviewed by Mark D. Walker (Guatemala 1971–73) • The “Godfather of contemporary travel writing” has probably chronicled more places in the world than almost any other author. This is his third volume of essays, following Sunrise with Seamonsters (1984) and Fresh Air Fiend (2001), for a total of 134 essays written over 53 years. This new collection of essays is a veritable cornucopia of sights, characters, and experiences covering the globe. The collection includes varied topics and showcases his sheer versatility as a writer. The title of the book is based on a 1945 painting by the Irish-born artist known for his grotesque, emotionally charged, raw imagery that, according to Theroux, sums up all travel writing and many essays. In the introduction of . . .

Read More

Jenny Phillips (Lesotho), writer and award-winning filmmaker, dies at 76

  Thanks for the ‘heads up’ from Susan Zawalich. • Jenny Phillips, writer and award-winning filmmaker, dies at 76 by Bryan Marquard Boston Globe staff JULY 13, 2018 Mrs. Phillips sought Fidel Castro’s help in securing documents of Ernest Hemingway. In an Alabama prison, one of her several far-flung outposts of compassion and creativity, Jenny Phillips recorded her conversations with lifers and death row inmates — those discarded in “the dustbin of humanity,” she would later say. Back home in Concord, she played the tapes as she drove, letting their voices fill her car and spark her imagination. “They wanted people to know their stories so they wouldn’t be forgotten,” Mrs. Phillips, who turned those initial encounters into an award-winning documentary, recalled a few years later, in 2008. “They also wanted their stories to somehow help other people. As well as a wish to be remembered, there’s a wish to be useful.” Drawn . . .

Read More

Peace Corps Porn

The paperback jacket is torn. The wrinkled pages bent and stained. Still, the cover photo of the naked Peace Corps Volunteer is crystal clear and one exposed breast is bright in the sunlight of the camera flash. Beneath the woman’s breast, as if a yellow sticker has been tapped over her belly button, is a bold declaration. A REPRINT FROM THE BEST OF OUR ADULT NOVELS WHICH MAY HAVE BEEN PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED UNDER ONE OR MORE DIFFERENT TITLES The novel is entitled Passion Delight, written by Frances Sibley. It is, the back cover says, a Body Talk Library book, published in 1985 by American Art Enterprises of California. A quick google search found the publisher, but no mention of Passion Delight, or where one might buy a copy. Perhaps this is a new title. Nor could I find out anything about “Frances Sibley”…..was she an RPCV in Senegal who set . . .

Read More

Finding “Teranga” from Senegal to the streets of Paris by Carrie Knowlton (Senegal)

  Teranga by Carrie Knowlton (Senegal 1999-01) • You can fall in love with a person, but you can also fall in love with moments in time, the sounds of drums on the beach, and roosters crowing while women pound millet at dawn. You can fall in love with the way the Atlantic Ocean smells at sunset and the way all those things come together to become your memory of a place. After two and a half years living in Senegal while serving in the Peace Corps, I was smitten. Senegal is that bump that juts out into the Atlantic Ocean just below the Sahara desert on the western-most tip of Africa. There is a beach in the capital, Dakar, where you can sit and eat a plate of fish and rice, watch the sunset, and listen to drumming and the call to prayer. The country is 92% Muslim and French is . . .

Read More

RPCV Who Served with Distinction in the Foreign Service (Ethiopia)

Recently, I have published a series of blog items on RPCVs who have fulfilled Kennedy’s wish that Returned Peace Corps Volunteers would join the State Department and become our future ambassadors and finally break the “pale, male & Yale” syndrome of the Foreign Service. I have now identified fifty-four RPCVs, men and women of all ethnic groups, who have become, as they are formally called, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary. RPCVs have also made significant contributions to the State Department in many ways  besides becoming ambassadors. One who did so is Tom Gallagher,  a Volunteer with me in Ethiopia from 1962-64. Gallagher was the youngest chief of a major diplomatic mission (US Consulate, Guayaquil), and was well on his way to an ambassadorial appointment when he made the decision to become the first civil servant in the world to publicly and voluntarily declare that he was a homosexual. Having done so, . . .

Read More

Lawrence F. Lihosit (Honduras) new PEACE CORPS BIBLIOGRAPHY

  Using several sources, mainly Marian Haley Beil’s (Ethiopia 1962-64) listings, started in the 1979 Peace Corps Writers & Readers and currently with 452 titles and available at this website) as well as the 1989 annotated bibliography compiled by Robert B. Marks Ridinger, and also the Library of Congress bibliography, Larry Lihosit (Honduras 1975-77) has published a handy short text entitled Peace Corps Bibliography which contains published work by volunteers and staff about the agency and/or their service. The book is divided into three sections; (1) journals, letters and memoirs, (2) anthologies and (3) history. More than 230 volunteer and staff have written and published journals, letters and memoirs. There are more than a dozen anthologies. The book is available via Amazon.com books. Prior to the Internet and Print-On-Demand books, few Peace Corps Volunteers published accounts of their experience. Of all the first-person accounts, Larry has found that only twelve percent (12%) were published . . .

Read More

Carole Sojka Interviewed on DESTINATION MYSTERY (Somalia)

I have the great pleasure this time of interviewing one of the most lovely and interesting of writers: Carole Sojka. Carole has lived a lifetime of adventures, notably with her husband as one of the first thousand Peace Corps volunteers, and traveling all over the world. She worked, traveled, raised a family, and in retirement, turned her hand to writing. And so a new adventure began. Carole has two books to date and a third on the way in her Andi Battaglia police series, set in Florida. The first, A Reason to Kill, introduces Andi as she tries to break away from her past and start fresh. But of course the past always has a way of sneaking up on you. In her second book, So Many Reasons to Die, it’s Andi’s partner Greg who finds that the past is hard to lay to rest. Especially when she winds up murdered on . . .

Read More

“Remembering Peace Corps work: ‘It was our job to save the world’” (Tanganyika)

Thanks to a ‘heads up’ from Dan Campbell (El Salvador 1974–77) • Remembering Peace Corps work “It was our job to save the world” After 57 years, four men still gather to reminisce From the Jefferson City, Missouri, News Tribune June 6, 2018 .   Four men who set out to change the world nearly 60 years ago gathered in Jefferson City this week to reminisce and play folk music. The men were members of the first wave of young adults sent overseas as part of the Peace Corps, created by John F. Kennedy shortly after he became president. Several men who were in the first wave of Peace Corps Volunteers gathered for a reunion this week to share stories and reminisce. They also share some that helped form them and the direction in life it caused them to remember Peace Corps work: ‘It was our job to save the world’ Lenny . . .

Read More

The Museum of the Peace Corps Experience

Introducing… The Museum that Celebrates Your Service! The Museum of the Peace Corps Experience (MPCE) debuts virtually in 2018 and will soon becomes brick and mortar in Washington, D.C.  Help us realize this dream! Imagine a museum designed to tell Peace Corps stories, displaying artifacts from all around the world . . .. A museum that connects people and increases global understanding . . .. A place which inspires young people to serve their communities at home and abroad . . .. A shrine to our common humanity, demonstrating that our connections are more fundamental than all the forces that divide us into separate cultures and nations. You can get involved from the very beginning of this new adventure!  Here’ s how — 1. Visit our new website! Learn more about the plans for developing the Museum. 2. Login to the Museum’s new website.  Click here to create a password and login. By logging in, you’ll be able to update your . . .

Read More

Do Africans Want Peace Corps Volunteers?

Thanks to ‘heads up’ about the following article  from Mark Wentling (Honduras 1967–69, Togo 1970–73; PC Staff: Togo, Gabon, Niger 1973–77) • Do Africans Want Peace Corps Volunteers? by Francis Tapon Contributor, Forbes Magazine Most tourists use the city of Tambacounda as a pitstop as they traverse Senegal. There’s little to see or do in town. There are even fewer touristic sites in the surrounding villages. Still, sometimes it’s the unpopular destinations that yield the most interesting stories. The United States Peace Corps operates in safe, poor African countries. It avoids dangerous regions. The Peace Corps Volunteers (PCVs) in Tambacounda invited me to celebrate the Fourth of July with them. We had no fireworks but we shared some hotdogs and Doritos under an American flag. I asked them, “Is the Peace Corps useful in Senegal?” One PVC said that they had trouble convincing locals to plant their own crops because they knew a . . .

Read More

Copyright © 2016. Peace Corps Worldwide.