Archive - December 27, 2016

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“Third World and Ashamed of It” by Folwell Dunbar (Ecuador)
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Review: GLOBAL GEOPOLITICAL POWER AND AFRICAN POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC INSTITUTIONS by John James Quinn (Zaire)

“Third World and Ashamed of It” by Folwell Dunbar (Ecuador)

  Thanks for the ‘Heads Up’ about the following article from Carol Scott (Ethiopia 1966-68) • Third World and ashamed of it Published in the New Orleans Advocate December 27, 2016 As a Peace Corps volunteer in Ecuador, I lived and worked with people who had very little. There were children selling Chiclets on the square, women cooking tortillas on makeshift grills on sidewalks, young men singing on buses and trains, prostitutes advertising themselves in alleys, and elderly shaking tin cans on street corners. Poverty was a way of life for many. I came to define “Third World” by the number of people eking out an existence on the street, and by the way in which the government supported them (or didn’t). In reality, the definition is far more complicated, and the term itself is misleading and controversial. By my definition, though, Ecuador was certainly “Third World.” The other day . . .

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Review: GLOBAL GEOPOLITICAL POWER AND AFRICAN POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC INSTITUTIONS by John James Quinn (Zaire)

  Global Geopolitical Power and African Political and Economic Institutions: When Elephants Fight by John James Quinn (Zaire PCV/Staff 1983-86) Lexington Books 394 pages 2015 $110.00 (hardback); $104.50 (kindle) Reviewed by Robert Hamilton (Ethiopia 1965-67) • Tembo, zikipigana huumia nyasi (When two elephants fight, it’s the grass that suffers.) Swahili proverb   Professor John James Quinn of Truman State University in Missouri is moderately hopeful that economic and political changes during the period 1990 to the present will bring continued marginal success for Africa. Economic institutions in Africa changed after 1990 and the end of the Cold War, Quinn says.  African states were in debt and they were forced by international lending organizations to undertake fiscal reforms, including the “removal of impediments to trade, and some privatization of previously state-owned companies.” Still, Quinn notes, the African elite remains in control of large enterprises, and generally, a single majority party continues . . .

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