Archive - June 2014

1
Writers Beware: The E-Reader Death Watch Begins
2
Carrie Hessler-Radelet Sworn In as 19th Director of the Peace Corps
3
Nautilus Book Award Goes To Juana Bordas (Chile 1964-66)
4
Nominate Your Favorite Book Published by an RPCV in 2013
5
Review: The Power of Latino Leadership by Juana Bordas (Chile 1964-66)
6
Review: Africa’s Release: by Mark Wentling (Honduras 1967-69, Togo 1970–73))
7
Rereading Gabriel García Marquez
8
The NPCA Global Education News Now Online
9
Review: The Dandy Vigilante by Kevin Daley (Samoa 1986-89)
10
Review of Dan Grossman's (Niger 1992-94) Rogue Elephants

Writers Beware: The E-Reader Death Watch Begins

The E-Reader Death Watch Begins By Jordan Weissmann, Slate Tech writers have begun rolling out their eulogies for the humble e-reader, which Mashable has deemed “the next iPod.” As in, it’s the next revolutionary, single-purpose device that’s on the verge of being replaced by smartphones and tablet computers. Barnes & Noble is spinning off its Nook division. Amazon just debuted its own smartphone, which some are taking as a tacit admission that more people are reading books on their phone these days, to the detriment of the Kindle. The analysts at Forrester, meanwhile, expect that U.S. e-reader sales will tumble to 7 million per year by 2017, down from 25 million in 2012. At New York Magazine, Kevin Roose argues that this is “bad news for the book industry.” He writes: If you’ve ever tried to read a book on your phone, you’ll know why. Reading on an original Kindle or . . .

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Carrie Hessler-Radelet Sworn In as 19th Director of the Peace Corps

Carrie Hessler-Radelet Sworn In as 19th Director of the Peace Corps Hessler-Radelet committed to using the tools, technologies and opportunities of the 21st century to strengthen the Peace Corps today WASHINGTON, D.C., June 25, 2014 – Carrie Hessler-Radelet was sworn in as the 19th Director of the Peace Corps Wednesday at a ceremony at Peace Corps headquarters in Washington, D.C. Hessler-Radelet comes from a four-generation Peace Corps family and served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Western Samoa with her husband from 1981-1983. Since 2010, she served as the agency’s deputy director and acting director. “Everywhere I go in the Peace Corps world, I hear testimonies of the impact volunteers have had on their communities,” Hessler-Radelet said. “Peace Corps volunteers are special people – they come with the tools of the 21st century but the heart and soul of a timeless Peace Corps. Serving as Peace Corps director is truly the great . . .

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Nautilus Book Award Goes To Juana Bordas (Chile 1964-66)

Nautilus Book Awards has recognized The Power of Latino Leadership by author Juana Bordas with this prestigious award in the area of Multicultural/Indigenous Literature. The Nautilus Book Awards is an annual accolade of books in the genre of social and economic equality. The award recognizes “Better books for a better world.” Established in the U.S. in 1998, Nautilus is considered a “major” book award There are over 50 million Latinos in the US and it is estimated that by 2050 one in three of the US population will be Latino. While many people may know about the history and contributions of Latinos, there is scant information on the powerful way Latinos have led their community. Yet, Latinos have only advanced to where they are today because of their leaders and collective efforts. A long-time Latina leader, Bordas is a founder of Denver’s Mi Casa Resource Center and was the first President . . .

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Nominate Your Favorite Book Published by an RPCV in 2013

It is time to nominate your favorite Peace Corps book published in 2013 for the Peace Corps Writers annual awards. Make your nomination(s) in the comment section following this announcement so people can see what books have been recognized. You may nominate your own book; books written by friends; books written by total strangers. The books can be about the Peace Corps or on any topic. The books must have been published in 2013. The awards will be announced in August. Thank you for nominating your favorite book written by a PCV, RPCV or Peace Corps Staff. A framed certificate and money are given to the winners. Email your nominations to jpcoyne@optonline.net. Paul Cowan Non-Fiction Award First given in 1990, the Paul Cowan Non-Fiction Award was named to honor Paul Cowan, a Peace Corps Volunteer who served in Ecuador. Cowan wrote The Making of An Un-American about his experiences as a Volunteer in . . .

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Review: The Power of Latino Leadership by Juana Bordas (Chile 1964-66)

The Power of Latino Leadership: Culture, Inclusion, and Contribution By Juana Bordas (Chile 1964-66) Berrett-Koehler Publisher 258 pages 2013 $19.95 (paperback), $9.18 (Kindle) Reviewed by Jean Seigle (Paraguay 1976-78; PC/W 1991-94; CD Ecuador 1994-97; Regional Manager, Boston 1997-99). Juana Bordas has written a book that is a gift to every student of leadership.  Not just Latino leadership.  This book needs to sit, dog eared, on every book shelf next to Good to Great or whatever one’s favorite leadership book may be.  Yes, I am a huge fan.  A fan of not only this book, but of Latino culture and of the ten principles of Latino  leadership that Bordas identifies.  So fair warning. This is an important book about how Latino leadership has evolved as a reflection of Latino culture forged through centuries of conquest and acculturation which began in 200 BC, when the Romans initiated a 700 year occupation of . . .

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Review: Africa’s Release: by Mark Wentling (Honduras 1967-69, Togo 1970–73))

Africa’s Release: The Journey Continues (novel) by Mark Wentling (PCV Honduras 1967–69, 1970–73; PC Staff Togo, Gabon & Niger 1973–77) A Peace Corps Writers Book May 2014 232 pages $ 9.76 (paperback); $4.99 (Kindle) Review by Leita Kaldi Davis (Senegal 1993–96) Mark Wentling says he was born in Wichita, Kansas, but “made in Africa.”  That’s not hard to believe when you consider that since Wentling became a Peace Corps Volunteer in Togo in 1970 he went on to build a career of 43 years in Africa with Peace Corps, USAID, U.S. non-governmental organizations, and as Country Director for PLAN in Burkina Faso, and he has visited all 54 countries.  Wentling has published professional articles on development challenges and, to date, two books of fiction filled with magical reality, based on his own mystical, as well as practice experiences in Africa. Africa’s Release: The Journey Continues is the second in a . . .

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Rereading Gabriel García Marquez

I first read Cien Años de Soledad [One Hundred Years of Solitude] in English. The Spanish version was assigned reading for my Latin American literature class, whose kind Chilean professor, Fernando Alegría, would have forgiven me if he’d known. What I didn’t know was that within two years I’d be living not far from the mythical town of Macondo as a Peace Corps volunteer. The recent death of Gabriel García Marquez motivated me to read his epic novel again – this time in Spanish. Fifty years after my posting in Colombia, García Marquez’ wild, extravagant tale stirs up old memories entangled in cobwebs. Faded smells, flavors and feelings come alive. Barranquilla, in northern Colombia, across the Magdalena River from the province wherein lies Macondo, greeted me with a blast of heat, humidity, squadrons of mosquitoes, decaying buildings and the stench of rot. The marginal barrios where I lived and worked . . .

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The NPCA Global Education News Now Online

The NPCA Global Education News is now out online. It can be found at http://www.peacecorpsconnect.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/GlobalEdSummer2014.pdf A list of RPCV and Peace Corps books is on page 6. Global Education News is a quarterly teacher resource from the National Peace Corps Association and the Professional Interest Community of ASCD. They welcome your contributions. Please send letters or material for the newsletter to Susan Neyer, Editor, 1701 Lilac Drive, Walnut Creek, CA 94595 (925-933-4490) e-mail: SusanNeyer@astound.net

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Review: The Dandy Vigilante by Kevin Daley (Samoa 1986-89)

The Dandy Vigilante (mystery) by Kevin Daley (Samoa 1986-89) Anaphora Literary Press 252 pages March 2014 $19.00 (paperback), $3.99 (Kindle) Reviewed by Will Siegel (Ethiopia 1962-64) The hard-boiled crime genre is a tough nut in these days of sympathetic detectives who insist on dragging their personal problems into their professional crime fighting life. Just the right tone is needed. Lean a little on tough talk, you’re prone to cliché, lean on the curt description you’re liable to wander from the story line. And lean on the cynicism in which the genre reacted to the romantic novel, and you’re out of touch with an age already cynical about cynicism. Masters such as Raymond Chandler, Dashiell Hammett, or rougher types Ross MacDonald and Mickey Spillane set the tone in the 30’s and after the WW II. In today’s crowded acre of crime and mystery novels, the rub is how to get a . . .

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Review of Dan Grossman's (Niger 1992-94) Rogue Elephants

Rogue Elephants: a novel of the Peace Corps by Dan Grossman (Niger 1992-94) Lulu Publisher $16.00 (paperback) 300 pages2013 (Reissued) Reviewed by Richard M. Grimsrud (India 1965-67) For the most part, Dan Grossman’s novel Rogue Elephants is a fast and informative read about Peace Corps operations during the early Nineties in southeast Niger, a little-known area in West Africa at the southern edge of the Sahara adjacent to where the terrorist group Boko Haram (which literally means “Western education is sinful and forbidden” in Hausa) recently kidnapped 276 schoolgirls. The book provides among its many interesting insights a look at how the Peace Corps experience can affect sexual diversity and assault and a good ethnographic sketch of Hausa culture, from which Boko Haram has drawn most of its adherents. Hausa culture is a fusion of Arab and traditional black African systems, which grew up in the Sudan/Sahel zone with the . . .

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