Archive - May 2014

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The Peace Corps Community Archive at American University Seeks Your Story
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Review — I Climbed Mt. Rainier with Jimi Hendrix’s High School Counselor by Rick Fordyce (Ghana)
3
Peace Corps Doctor Talks Mental Health and Elliot Rodger
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Kinky Friedman (Borneo 1967-69) Loses Again in Texas
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Review of Martin R. Ganzglass' (Somalia 1966-68) Cannons for the Cause
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Review of Arthur J. Frankel's (India 1966-68) Indian Summer: A Love Letter to India and the Story of India 29
7
Ernesto Butcher (Korea 1968-70) Unsung by the Peace Corps
8
Remarks in Bonn at the Signing of a Charter Establishing the German Peace Corps, 24 June 1963 – President Kennedy
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Maureen Orth's (Colombia 1964-66) Son, Luke Russert, Gives A 'Shout Out' for The Peace Corps
10
RPCV Writer Stephan Hirst (Liberia 1962-64) is Winner in Arizona

The Peace Corps Community Archive at American University Seeks Your Story

The Peace Corps Community Archive at American University Library is actively seeking the ‘histories’ of RPCVs. The Kennedy Library in Boston has a ‘Peace Corps collection’ from the first years of the agency, i.e., during JFK’s presidency, and there are other collections, including the official records of the Peace Corps at the National Archives in Washington. RPCVs funded one collection of objects in Portland, Oregon, and various libraries have the papers of former students, but American University’s venture is new, impressive, and expanding. Unlike the Peace Corps agency, which appears to deliberately want to ‘bury its past’ having done little over the years to document the successes and failures of the Peace Corps, RPCVs have taken it upon themselves through their writings, films, photos, and organizations to put together the history of their experiences, and now universities and libraries are becoming aware of the valuable items that RPCV have in . . .

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Review — I Climbed Mt. Rainier with Jimi Hendrix’s High School Counselor by Rick Fordyce (Ghana)

  I Climbed Mt. Rainier with Jimi Hendrix’s High School Counselor, and Other Stories of the Pacific Northwest by Rick Fordyce (Ghana 1978-80) Merrimack Media $12.00 (paperback) 125 pages 2014 Reviewed by Don Messerschmidt (Nepal 1963-65) If you grew up in Seattle in the ’60s or ’70s, you’ll appreciate this little book. You might even understand some of the teenage jargon. Groovy! Cool! There are twelve stories here, about adolescents in the city trying hard not to get busted for pot; about camping out in the North Cascades with a bunch of friends trying hard to like it; about making friends and comparing notes about urban high school life; about flying off to Europe with other teenagers, smoking cigarettes in flight (before the ban), and kissing the girl sitting next to, though you’d only just met; and, among others, the title story about climbing Mt. Rainier with the guy who . . .

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Peace Corps Doctor Talks Mental Health and Elliot Rodger

Fuller Torrey was the Peace Corps Doctor in Ethiopia -1964-66-and today is a well known psychiatrist and schizophrenia researcher. He is the executive director of the Stanley Medical Research Institute (SMRI) and founder of the Treatment Advocacy Center(TAC), a nonprofit organization whose principal activity is promoting the passage and implementation of outpatient commitment laws and civil commitment laws and standards in individual states that allow mentally ill people to be forcibly committed and medicated easily throughout the United States. He is well known as an advocate of the idea that severe mental illness is due to biological factors and not social factors. He has received two Commendation Medals by the U.S. Public Health Service and numerous other awards and tributes. Torrey is on the board of the Treatment Advocacy Center (TAC), which describes itself as being “a national nonprofitadvocacy organization.[5] TAC supports involuntary treatment when deemed appropriate by a judge (at the urging of the . . .

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Kinky Friedman (Borneo 1967-69) Loses Again in Texas

Texas  rancher Jim Hogan has defeated singer and humorist Kinky Friedman to claim the Democratic nomination for Texas agriculture commissioner. Hogan, of Cleburne, topped Friedman in Tuesday’s runoff after no candidate won more than 50 percent in the three-way March primary. The agricultural commissioner oversees the school-lunch program in Texas while more broadly handling farming issues. Friedman ran unsuccessfully as an independent for governor in 2006 and lost the Democratic nomination for agricultural commissioner in 2010. Hogan made it to the runoff despite minimal campaigning. Agriculture Commissioner – Democrat 99 % Precincts Reporting Jim Hogan 103,88354% Kinky Friedman 89,30546%

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Review of Martin R. Ganzglass' (Somalia 1966-68) Cannons for the Cause

Cannons for the Cause: A Novel of the American Revolution by Martin R. Ganzglass  (Somalia 1966–68) A Peace Corps Writers Book $11.69 (paperback) March 2014 340 pages Reviewed by Thomas E. Coyne Martin R. Ganzglass has been a Peace Corps Volunteer, a lawyer, a non-fiction author and is now a novelist who believes “thoroughly researched, well-written historical fiction will attract readers who otherwise would not read straight history books”. And he is right! The ranks of those who are turned off from the knowledge of days and decades gone by because of over emphasis on dates and place names would probably fill several armies. They never get to savor the meat and potatoes of past events; the unlikely stew of people, prejudices, truth and lies that are in our past and have shaped our present. Cannons for the Cause begins a tale that, if the author has his way (and . . .

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Review of Arthur J. Frankel's (India 1966-68) Indian Summer: A Love Letter to India and the Story of India 29

Indian Summer: A Love Letter to India and the Story of India 29 by Arthur J. Frankel (India 1966-68) AuthorHouse $29.95 (hardback),20.66 (paperback), $7.99 (Kindle) 299 pages 2014 Reviewed by Tony D’Souza (Ivory Coast 2000-02, Madagascar 2002-03) ARTHUR J. FRANKEL’S Indian Summer: A Love Letter to India and the Story of India 29 tells the tale of the Peace Corps experience during one of its earliest periods, when the agency was just figuring out how best to prepare Americans for two years abroad, as well as place them once in country. Frankel’s group, which served in India from 1966–1968, coincidentally included my mother, then Alice Neuendorf, age 27. Though she’s never mentioned in the book, her blurry picture appears in the black and white photo section, standing in a white dress with other Volunteers in front of a Bangalore guesthouse. She’s told me stories about that guesthouse all my life, . . .

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Ernesto Butcher (Korea 1968-70) Unsung by the Peace Corps

You most likely have never heard of Ernesto Butcher unless you were a PCV in South Korea in 1968-70, or you worked for the New York Port Authority in the days of 9/11. I never heard of him until Dick Lipez (Ethiopia 1962-64) alerted me to Ernesto Butcher’s obituary in The New York Times on Saturday, May 24, 2014. Ernesto Butcher died on May 15 in Maplewood, N.J. He was 69. He apparently had a heart attack while jogging according to his wife, Kristen Peck Butcher. Most RPCV operate (with some exceptions) in the shadow of fame or notoriety and are content on getting the job done. Perhaps it is a hangover from working in totally obscurity in faraway villages of the world and just being satisfied with what can be accomplished without a lot of fanfare. Ernesto Butcher appears to have been that sort of guy, and it has . . .

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Remarks in Bonn at the Signing of a Charter Establishing the German Peace Corps, 24 June 1963 – President Kennedy

On Memorial Day, the nation pauses to remember and honor those who died defending this country in War.  President Kennedy honored those not merely by recognizing their sacrifice but by working to make such sacrifices not necessary. In his last summer in his office, he signed the Test Ban Treaty with Russia and toured Europe, making his famous “Ich Bin a Berliner” at the Berlin Wall.Perhaps his most eloquent speech on behalf of peace, is the one he made in Bonn, Germany, heralding the beginning of the German Peace Corps.  I think it is fitting to listen again to him.  The President speaks of the conflict with Communism, a conflict that is now won and done.  But we face new threats and challenges,” including the common enemies of mankind.”  Kennedy’s words still ring true. Here  is this gem: Kennedy speaking about the creation of the German Peace Corps. It is . . .

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Maureen Orth's (Colombia 1964-66) Son, Luke Russert, Gives A 'Shout Out' for The Peace Corps

Keeping America’s Peace Corps tradition alive NBC News’ Luke Russert discusses his personal connection to the Peace Corps program, and the program’s increasing importance in the new millennium. http://www.msnbc.com/the-cycle/watch/keeping-the-peace-corps-tradition-alive-262602819832 Thanks Luke!

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RPCV Writer Stephan Hirst (Liberia 1962-64) is Winner in Arizona

RPCV Writer Stephan Hirst (Liberia 1962-64) is Winner in Arizona The winner of the adult category 2014 ONE BOOKAZ is Lauren Greasewater’s War by Stephen Hirst (Liberia 1962-64). The “One Book” movement began in 1998 when Nancy Pearl, executive director of the Washington Center for the Book in the Seattle Public Library, initiated “If All Seattle Read the Same Book.” With funding from the Lila Wallace Reader’s Digest Fund and several local sponsors, she invited members of the public to read The Sweet Hereafter by Russell Banks, and brought the author to Seattle for three days in December to discuss his book in a series of free public programs. In 2001, the Library of Congress’s Center for the Book took the One Book Project nationwide, inviting states and cities to choose books for everyone in their area to read and discuss in book clubs and libraries during One Book month (April usually). The number of projects grew rapidly, from 63 in 30 states in June 2002 to more than 350 . . .

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